FLOSS Project Planets

KnackForge: How to update Drupal 8 core?

Planet Drupal - Sat, 2018-03-24 00:01
How to update Drupal 8 core?

Let's see how to update your Drupal site between 8.x.x minor and patch versions. For example, from 8.1.2 to 8.1.3, or from 8.3.5 to 8.4.0. I hope this will help you.

  • If you are upgrading to Drupal version x.y.z

           x -> is known as the major version number

           y -> is known as the minor version number

           z -> is known as the patch version number.

Sat, 03/24/2018 - 10:31
Categories: FLOSS Project Planets

Flocon de toile | Freelance Drupal: Change configuration directly on a Drupal 8 production site

Planet Drupal - Thu, 2017-11-16 08:00
Managing native configuration with Drupal 8 makes it very easy to make changes or additions to the configuration from a site instance (such as a development environment) to another site instance (the production environment). These configuration exports and imports of a site are made in one piece: that is, the entire configuration of a site, which is updated. Thus if configuration additions have been made to the production site, they will be overwritten at the next import of the configuration if these configurations are not present also on the source environment. But there are valid use cases where certain configurations can and must be modified directly in production. Examples of immediate use are, for example, the creation of new Webform forms, or the creation or update of new Newsletters managed with the SimpleNews module. It is quite legitimate for a webmaster to modify or create new NewsLetters on the production site. It's almost like content, except that ... it's a configuration entity. Let's discover how to manage these particular cases with the module Configuration split, module that will allow us to maintain an organized process to manage the evolution and maintenance of a site in production while allowing the modification of some configurations live.
Categories: FLOSS Project Planets

Kushal Das: PyConf Hyderabad 2017

Planet Python - Wed, 2017-11-15 23:25

In the beginning of October, I attended a new PyCon in India, PyConf Hyderabad (no worries, they are working on the name for the next year). I was super excited about this conference, the main reason is being able to meet more Python developers from India. We are a large country, and we certainly need more local conferences :)

We reached the conference hotel a day before the event starts along with Py. The first day of the conference was workshop day, we reached the venue on time to say hi to everyone. Meet the team at the conference and many old friends. It was good to see that folks traveled from all across the country to volunteer for the conference. Of course, we had a certain number of dgplug folks there :)

In the conference day, Anwesha and /my setup in the PSF booth, and talked to the attendees. During the lighting talk session, Sayan and Anwesha introduced PyCon Pune, and they also opened up the registration during the lighting talk :). I attended Chandan Kumar’s talk about his journey into upstream projects. Have to admit that I feel proud to see all the work he has done.

Btw, I forgot to mention that lunch at PyConf Hyderabad was the best conference food ever. They had some amazing biryani :).

The last talk of the day was my keynote titled Free Software movement & current days. Anwesha and I wrote an article on the history of Free Software a few months back, and that the talk was based on that. This was also the first time I spoke about Freedom of the Press Foundation (attended my first conference as the FPF staff member).

The team behind the conference did some amazing groundwork to make this conference happening. It was a good opportunity to meet the community, and make new friends.

Categories: FLOSS Project Planets

PreviousNext: Reusable style guide components using field formatters and twig embed

Planet Drupal - Wed, 2017-11-15 21:32
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At PNX, style guide driven development is our bag. It’s what we love: building a living document that provides awesome reference for all our front end components. And Drupal 8, with its use of Twig, complements this methodology perfectly. The ability to create a single component, and then embed that component and its markup throughout a Drupal site in a variety of different ways without having to use any tricks or hacks is a thing of beauty.

by Jack Taranto / 16 November 2017 Create a component

For this example we are going to use the much loved collapsible/accordion element. It’s a good example of a rich component because it uses CSS, JS, and Twig to provide an element that’s going to be used everywhere throughout a website.

To surmise the component it’s made up of the following files:

collapsible.scss collapsible.widget.js collapsible.drupal.js collapsible.twig collapsible.svg

The .scss file will end up compiling to a .css file, but we will be using SASS here because it’s fun. The widget.js file is a jQuery UI Widget Factory plugin that gives us some niceties - like state. The drupal.js file is a wrapper that adds our accordion widget as a drupal.behavior. The svg file provides some pretty graphics, and finally the twig file is where the magic starts.

Let’s take a look at the twig file:

{{ attach_library('pnx_project_theme/collapsible') }} <section class="js-collapsible collapsible {{ modifier_class }}"> <h4 class="collapsible__title"> {% block title %} Collapsible {% endblock %} h4> <div class="collapsible__content"> {% block content %} <p>Curabitur blandit tempus porttitor. Cum sociis natoque penatibus et magnis dis parturient montes, nascetur ridiculus mus. Morbi leo risus, porta ac consectetur ac, vestibulum at eros. Praesent commodo cursus magna, vel scelerisque nisl consectetur et. Fusce dapibus, tellus ac cursus commodo, tortor mauris condimentum nibh, ut fermentum massa justo sit amet risus.p> {% endblock %} div> section>

This is a standard-ish BEM based component. It uses a js-* class to attach the widget functionality. We also have a {{ modifier_class }} variable, that can be used by kss-node to alter the default appearance of the collapsible (more on this later). There are two elements in this component title and content. They are expressed inside a twig block. What this means is we can take this twig file and embed it elsewhere. Because the component is structured this way, when it’s rendered in its default state by KSS we will have some default content, and the ability to show it's different appearances/styles using modifier_class.

Our twig file also uses the custom Drupal attach_library function which will bring in our components CSS and JS from the following theme.libraries.yml entry:

collapsible: css: component: src/components/collapsible/collapsible.css: {} js: src/components/collapsible/collapsible.widget.js : {} src/components/collapsible/collapsible.drupal.js : {} dependencies: - core/jquery - core/drupal - core/jquery.once - core/jquery.ui - core/jquery.ui.widget

This is a pretty meaty component so it’s got some hefty javascript requirements. Not a problem in the end as it’s all going to get minified and aggregated by Drupal Cores library system.

And there we have it - a rich javascript component. It’s the building block for all the cool stuff we are about to do.

Use it in a field template override

As it stands we can throw this component as-is into KSS which is nice (although we must add our css and js to KSS manually, attach_library() won’t help us there sadly - yet), but we want drupal to take advantage of our twig file. This is where twigs embed comes in. Embed in twig is a mixture of the often used include, and the occasionally used extend. It’s a super powerful piece of kit that lets us do all the things.

Well these things anyway: include our twig templates contents, add variables to it, and add HTML do it.

Because this is an accordion, it’s quite likely we’ll want some field data inside it. The simplest way to get this happening is with a clunky old field template override. As an example I’ll use field--body.html.twig:

{% for item in items %} {% embed '@pnx_project_theme/components/collapsible/collapsible.twig' %} {% block title %} {{ label }} {% endblock %} {% block content %} {{ item.content }} {% endblock %} {% endembed %} {% endfor %}

Here you can see the crux of what we are trying to achieve. The collapsible markup is specified in one place only, and other templates can include that base markup and then insert the content they need to use in the twig blocks. The beauty of this is any time this field is rendered on the page, all the markup, css and js will be included with it, and it all lives in our components directory. No longer are meaty pieces of markup left inside Drupal template directories - our template overrides are now embedding much richer components.

There is a trick above though, and it’s the glue that brings this together. See how we have a namespace in the embed path - all drupal themes/modules get a twig namespace automatically which is just @your_module_name or @your_theme_name - however it points to the theme or modules templates directory only. Because we are doing style guide driven development and we have given so much thought to creating a rich self-contained component our twig template lives in our components directory instead, so we need to use a custom twig namespace to point there. To do that, we use John Albins Component Libraries module. It lets us add a few lines to our theme.info.yml file so our themes namespace can see our component templates:

component-libraries: pnx_project_theme: paths: - src - templates

Now anything in /src or /templates inside our theme can be included with our namespace from any twig template in Drupal.

Use it in a field formatter

Now let’s get real because field template overrides are not the right way to do things. We were talking about making things DRY weren’t we?

Enter field formatters. At the simple end of this spectrum our formatter needs an accompanying hook_theme entry so the formatter can render to a twig template. We will need a module to give the field formatter somewhere to live.

Setup your module file structure as so:

src/Plugin/Field/FieldFormatter/CollapsibleFormatter.php templates/collapsible-formatter.html.twig pnx_project_module.module pnx_project_module.info.yml

Your formatter lives inside the src directory and looks like this:

<?php namespace Drupal\pnx_project_module\Plugin\Field\FieldFormatter; use Drupal\Core\Field\FieldItemListInterface; use Drupal\Core\Field\FormatterBase; use Drupal\Core\Form\FormStateInterface; /** * A field formatter for trimming and wrapping text. * * @FieldFormatter( * id = "collapsible_formatter", * label = @Translation("Collapsible"), * field_types = { * "text_long", * "text_with_summary", * } * ) */ class CollapsibleFormatter extends FormatterBase { /** * {@inheritdoc} */ public function viewElements(FieldItemListInterface $items, $langcode = NULL) { $elements = []; foreach ($items as $delta => $item) { $elements[$delta] = [ '#theme' => 'collapsible_formatter', '#title' => $items->getFieldDefinition()->getLabel(), '#content' => $item->value, '#style' => NULL, ]; } return $elements; } }

And the hook_theme function lives inside the .module file:

<?php /** * @file * Main module functions. */ /** * Implements hook_theme(). */ function pnx_project_module_theme($existing, $type, $theme, $path) { return [ 'collapsible_formatter' => [ 'variables' => [ 'title' => NULL, 'content' => NULL, 'style' => NULL, ], ], ]; }

Drupal magic is going to look for templates/collapsible-formatter.html.twig in our module directory automatically now. Our hook_theme template is going to end up looking pretty similar to our field template:

{% embed '@pnx_project_theme/components/collapsible/collapsible.twig' with { modifier_class: style } %} {% block title %} {{ title }} {% endblock %} {% block content %} {{ content }} {% endblock %} {% endembed %}

Now jump into the field display config of a text_long field, and you’ll be able to select the collapsible and it’s going to render our component markup combined with the field data perfectly, whilst attaching necessary CSS/JS.

Add settings to the field formatter

Let's take it a bit further. We are missing some configurability here. Our component has a modifier_class with a mini style (a cut down smaller version of the full accordion). You'll notice in the twig example above, we are using the with notation which works the same way for embed as it does for include to allow us to send an array of variables through to the parent template. In addition our hook_theme function has a style variable it can send through from the field formatter. Using field formatter settings we can make our field formatter far more useful to the site builders that are going to use it. Let's look at the full field formatter class after we add settings:

class CollapsibleFormatter extends FormatterBase { /** * {@inheritdoc} */ public function viewElements(FieldItemListInterface $items, $langcode = NULL) { $elements = []; foreach ($items as $delta => $item) { $elements[$delta] = [ '#theme' => 'collapsible_formatter', '#title' => !empty($this->getSetting('label')) ? $this->getSetting('label') : $items->getFieldDefinition()->getLabel(), '#content' => $item->value, '#style' => $this->getSetting('style'), ]; } return $elements; } /** * {@inheritdoc} */ public function settingsSummary() { $summary = []; if ($label = $this->getSetting('label')) { $summary[] = 'Label: ' . $label; } else { $summary[] = 'Label: Using field label'; } if (empty($this->getSetting('style'))) { $summary[] = 'Style: Normal'; } elseif ($this->getSetting('style') === 'collapsible--mini') { $summary[] = 'Style: Mini'; } return $summary; } /** * {@inheritdoc} */ public function settingsForm(array $form, FormStateInterface $form_state) { $form['label'] = [ '#title' => $this->t('Label'), '#type' => 'textfield', '#default_value' => $this->getSetting('label'), '#description' => t('Customise the label text, or use the field label if left empty.'), ]; $form['style'] = [ '#title' => t('Style'), '#type' => 'select', '#options' => [ '' => t('Normal'), 'collapsible--mini' => t('Mini'), ], '#description' => t('See Styleguide section 6.1 for a preview of styles.'), '#default_value' => $this->getSetting('style'), ]; return $form; } /** * {@inheritdoc} */ public static function defaultSettings() { return [ 'label' => '', 'style' => '', ]; } }

There's a few niceties there: It allows us to set a custom label (for the whole field), it automatically assigns the correct modifier_class, it links to the correct section in the style guide in the settings field description, and it adds a settings summary so site builders can see the current settings at a glance. These are all patterns you should repeat.

Let's sum up

We've created a rich interactive BEM component with its own template. The component has multiple styles and displays an interactive demo of itself using kss-node. We've combined its assets into a Drupal library and made the template - which lives inside the style guides component src folder - accessible to all of Drupal via the Component Libraries module. We've built a field formatter that allows us to configure the components appearance/style. Without having to replicate any HTML anywhere.

The component directory itself within the style guide will always be the canonical source for every version of the component that is rendered around our site.

Tagged Twig

Posted by Jack Taranto
Front end developer

Dated 16 November 2017

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Categories: FLOSS Project Planets

DrupalEasy: DrupalEasy Podcast 198 - Dave Hall - Drupal Distributions and Puppies

Planet Drupal - Wed, 2017-11-15 19:53

Direct .mp3 file download.

Dave Hall (skwashd), Managing Director, Dave Hall Consulting joins Mike Anello to talk about the current state of Drupal distributions and what the future may hold.

Interview DrupalEasy News Sponsors
  • Drupal Aid - Drupal support and maintenance services. Get unlimited support, monthly maintenance, and unlimited small jobs starting at $99/mo.
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Follow us on Twitter Subscribe

Subscribe to our podcast on iTunes, Google Play or Miro. Listen to our podcast on Stitcher.

If you'd like to leave us a voicemail, call 321-396-2340. Please keep in mind that we might play your voicemail during one of our future podcasts. Feel free to call in with suggestions, rants, questions, or corrections. If you'd rather just send us an email, please use our contact page.

Categories: FLOSS Project Planets

Django Weblog: Django 2.0 release candidate 1 released

Planet Python - Wed, 2017-11-15 18:54

Django 2.0 release candidate 1 is the final opportunity for you to try out the assortment of new features before Django 2.0 is released.

The release candidate stage marks the string freeze and the call for translators to submit translations. Provided no major bugs are discovered that can't be solved in the next two weeks, Django 2.0 will be released on or around December 1. Any delays will be communicated on the django-developers mailing list thread.

Please use this opportunity to help find and fix bugs (which should be reported to the issue tracker). You can grab a copy of the package from our downloads page or on PyPI.

The PGP key ID used for this release is Tim Graham: 1E8ABDC773EDE252.

Categories: FLOSS Project Planets

Steinar H. Gunderson: Introducing Narabu, part 6: Performance

Planet Debian - Wed, 2017-11-15 17:43

Narabu is a new intraframe video codec. You probably want to read part 1, part 2, part 3, part 4 and part 5 first.

Like I wrote in part 5, there basically isn't a big splashy ending where everything is resolved here; you're basically getting some graphs with some open questions and some interesting observations.

First of all, though, I'll need to make a correction: In the last part, I wrote that encoding takes 1.2 ms for 720p luma-only on my GTX 950, which isn't correct—I remembered the wrong number. The right number is 2.3 ms, which I guess explains even more why I don't think it's acceptable at the current stage. (I'm also pretty sure it's possible to rearchitect the encoder so that it's much better, but I am moving on to other video-related things for the time being.)

I encoded a picture straight off my DSLR (luma-only) at various resolutions, keeping the aspect. Then I decoded it a bunch of times on my GTX 950 (low-end last-generation NVIDIA) and on my HD 4400 (ultraportable Haswell laptop) and measured the times. They're normalized for megapixels per second decoded; remember that doubling width (x axis) means quadruple the pixels. Here it is:

I'm not going to comment much beyond two observations:

  • Caches matter, even on GPU. This is the same data over and over again (so small images get an unrealistic boost), so up to a certain point, it's basically all in L1.
  • The GTX 950 doesn't really run away from the Intel card before it's getting enough data to chew on. Bigger GPUs don't have faster cores—they're just more parallel.

Encoding only contains the GTX 950 because I didn't finish the work to get that single int64 divide off:

This is… interesting. I have few explanations. Probably more benchmarking and profiling would be needed to make sense of any of it. In fact, it's so strange that I would suspect a bug, but it does indeed seem to create a valid bitstream that is decoded by the decoder.

Do note, however, that seemingly even on the smallest resolutions, there's a 1.7 ms base cost (you can't see it on the picture, but you'd see it in an unnormalized graph). I don't have a very good explanation for this either (even though there are some costs that are dependent on the alphabet size instead of the number of pixels), but figuring it out would probably be a great start for getting the performance up.

So that concludes the series, on a cliffhanger. :-) Even though it's not in a situation where you can just take it and put it into something useful, I hope it was an interesting introduction to the GPU! And in the meantime, I've released version 1.6.3 of Nageru, my live video mixer (also heavily GPU-based) with various small adjustments and bug fixes found before and during Trøndisk. And Movit is getting compute shaders for that extra speed boost, although parts of it is bending my head. Exciting times in GPU land :-)

Categories: FLOSS Project Planets

Kubuntu Most Wanted

Planet KDE - Wed, 2017-11-15 17:12

Kubuntu Cafe Live, is our new community show. This new format show is styled using a magazine format. We created lots of space for community involvement, breaking the show into multiple segments, and we want to get you involved. We are looking for Presenters, Trainers, Writers and Hosts.

  • Are you looking for an opportunity to present your idea, or application ?
  • Would you like to teach our community about an aspect of Kubuntu, or KDE ?
  • Would you like to be a show, article or news writer ?
  • Interested in being a host on Kubuntu Cafe Live ?

Contact Rick Timmis or Valorie Zimmerman to get started

The Kubuntu Cafe features a very broad variety of show segments. These include free format unconference segments which can accommodate your ideas. Dojo for teaching and training, Community Feedback, Developers Update, News & Views.

For upcoming show schedule please check the kubuntu calendar

Check out the show to see the new format,

 

Categories: FLOSS Project Planets

Daniel Pocock: Linking hackerspaces with OpenDHT and Ring

Planet Debian - Wed, 2017-11-15 14:57

Francois and Nemen at the FIXME hackerspace (Lausanne) weekly meeting are experimenting with the Ring peer-to-peer softphone:

Francois is using Raspberry Pi and PiCam to develop a telepresence network for hackerspaces (the big screens in the middle of the photo).

The original version of the telepresence solution is using WebRTC. Ring's OpenDHT potentially offers more privacy and resilience.

Categories: FLOSS Project Planets

Mediacurrent: Content as the Common Language of Web Development

Planet Drupal - Wed, 2017-11-15 14:21

If there’s one thing I learned while attending DrupalCon Baltimore 2017 this past spring, it’s that those of us involved in building the web are only getting more and more specialized in how we help build it. It boggles the mind to witness the sheer amount of new session tracks, new technologies, new design patterns, and new discussions that come up each year at DrupalCon.

Categories: FLOSS Project Planets

PyCharm: PyCharm 2017.3 EAP 10

Planet Python - Wed, 2017-11-15 12:47

This week’s early access program (EAP) version of PyCharm is now available from our website:

Get PyCharm 2017.3 EAP 10

The release is getting close, and we’re just polishing out the last small issues until it’s ready.

Improvements in This Version
  • kwargs autocompletion for Model.objects.create(). Django support is only available in PyCharm Professional Edition
  • An issue that would cause PyCharm to fill multiple log files per minute has been fixed
  • Docker Run configurations have been improving steadily throughout the EAP phase, in this version ports that are used in a binding but haven’t been exposed yet will be auto-exposed (Docker support is available only in PyCharm Professional Edition)
  • And more, have a look at the release notes for details

If these features sound interesting to you, try them yourself:

Get PyCharm 2017.3 EAP 10

If you are using a recent version of Ubuntu (16.04 and later) you can also install PyCharm EAP versions using snap:

sudo snap install [pycharm-professional | pycharm-community] --classic --edge

If you already used snap for the previous version, you can update using:

sudo snap refresh [pycharm-professional | pycharm-community] --classic --edge

As a reminder, PyCharm EAP versions:

  • Are free, including PyCharm Professional Edition EAP
  • Will work for 30 days from being built, you’ll need to update when the build expires

If you run into any issues with this version, or another version of PyCharm, please let us know on our YouTrack. If you have other suggestions or remarks, you can reach us on Twitter, or by commenting on the blog.

Categories: FLOSS Project Planets

Codementor: Onicescu correlation coefficient-Python - Alexandru Daia

Planet Python - Wed, 2017-11-15 12:41
Implementing a new correlation method based on kinetic energies I research
Categories: FLOSS Project Planets

Drupal blog: An update on the Layout Initiative for Drupal 8.4/8.5

Planet Drupal - Wed, 2017-11-15 11:39

This blog has been re-posted with permission from Dries Buytaert's blog. Please leave your comments on the original post.

Now Drupal 8.4 is released, and Drupal 8.5 development is underway, it is a good time to give an update on what is happening with Drupal's Layout Initiative.

8.4: Stable versions of layout functionality

Traditionally, site builders have used one of two layout solutions in Drupal: Panelizer and Panels. Both are contributed modules outside of Drupal core, and both achieved stable releases in the middle of 2017. Given the popularity of these modules, having stable releases closed a major functionality gap that prevented people from building sites with Drupal 8.

8.4: A Layout API in core

The Layout Discovery module added in Drupal 8.3 core has now been marked stable. This module adds a Layout API to core. Both the aforementioned Panelizer and Panels modules have already adopted the new Layout API with their 8.4 release. A unified Layout API in core eliminates fragmentation and encourages collaboration.

8.5+: A Layout Builder in core

Today, Drupal's layout management solutions exist as contributed modules. Because creating and building layouts is expected to be out-of-the-box functionality, we're working towards adding layout building capabilities to Drupal core.

Using the Layout Builder, you start by selecting predefined layouts for different sections of the page, and then populate those layouts with one or more blocks. I showed the Layout Builder in my DrupalCon Vienna keynote and it was really well received:

8.5+: Use the new Layout Builder UI for the Field Layout module

One of the nice improvements that went in Drupal 8.3 was the Field Layout module, which provides the ability to apply pre-defined layouts to what we call "entity displays". Instead of applying layouts to individual pages, you can apply layouts to types of content regardless of what page they are displayed on. For example, you can create a content type 'Recipe' and visually lay out the different fields that make up a recipe. Because the layout is associated with the recipe rather than with a specific page, recipes will be laid out consistently across your website regardless of what page they are shown on.

The basic functionality is already included in Drupal core as part of the experimental Fields Layout module. The goal for Drupal 8.5 is to stabilize the Fields Layout module, and to improve its user experience by using the new Layout Builder. Eventually, designing the layout for a recipe could look like this:

Layouts remains a strategic priority for Drupal 8 as it was the second most important site builder priority identified in my 2016 State of Drupal survey, right behind Migrations. I'm excited to see the work already accomplished by the Layout team, and look forward to seeing their progress in Drupal 8.5! If you want to help, check out the Layout Initiative roadmap.

Special thanks to Angie Byron for contributions to this blog post, to Tim Plunkett and Kris Vanderwater for their feedback during the writing process, and to Emilie Nouveau for the screenshot and video contributions.

Categories: FLOSS Project Planets

myDropWizard.com: Agencies: Don't keep passwords in your wiki!

Planet Drupal - Wed, 2017-11-15 11:16

You spend so much time writing secure code, and doing security updates, but you're putting all of that in danger with your wiki. A huge percentage of agencies put passwords into wikis - and other shared resources!!!

Using a shared Google/Office document, spreadsheet - even with black text on a black background - isn't much better! So, think of "wiki" in this context as being any "low-cost, low-security, high-accessibility, super-convenient storage."

You are putting your agency AND your customers at risk by keeping passwords in your company wiki!

Read more to find out why, and a better way to do it!

Categories: FLOSS Project Planets

Ian Ozsvald: PyDataBudapest and &#8220;Machine Learning Libraries You&#8217;d Wish You&#8217;d Known About&#8221;

Planet Python - Wed, 2017-11-15 10:50

I’m back at BudapestBI and this year it has its first PyDataBudapest track. Budapest is fun! I’ve had a second iteration talking on a slightly updated “Machine Learning Libraries You’d Wish You’d Known About” (updated from PyDataCardiff two weeks back). When I was here to give an opening keynote talk two years back the conference was a bit smaller, it has grown by +100 folk since then. There’s also a stronger emphasis on open source R and Python tools. As before, the quality of the members here is high – the conversations are great!

During my talk I used my Explaining Regression Predictions Notebook to cover:

  • Dask to speed up Pandas
  • TPOT to automate sklearn model building
  • Yellowbrick for sklearn model visualisation
  • ELI5 with Permutation Importance and model explanations
  • LIME for model explanations

Nick’s photo of me on stage

Some audience members asked about co-linearity detection and explanation. Whilst I don’t have a good answer for identifying these relationships, I’ve added a seaborn pairplot, a correlation plot and the Pandas Profiling tool to the Notebook which help to show these effects.

Although it is complicated, I’m still pretty happy with this ELI5 plot that’s explaining feature contributions to a set of cheap-to-expensive houses from the Boston dataset:

Boston ELI5

I’m planning to do some training on these sort of topics next year, join my training list if that might be of use.

Ian applies Data Science as an AI/Data Scientist for companies in ModelInsight, sign-up for Data Science tutorials in London. Historically Ian ran Mor Consulting. He also founded the image and text annotation API Annotate.io, co-authored SocialTies, programs Python, authored The Screencasting Handbook, lives in London and is a consumer of fine coffees.
Categories: FLOSS Project Planets

EuroPython Society: EuroPython 2018: Location and Dates

Planet Python - Wed, 2017-11-15 10:43

After a two month RFP bidding process with 19 venues from all over Europe, we are pleased to announce our selection of the location and venue for EuroPython 2018:

… yes, this is just one week before the famous Edinburgh Festival Fringe, so you can extend your stay a little longer if you like.

Based on the feedback we collected in the last few years, we have switched to a more compact conference layout for 2018:

  • Monday, Tuesday: Workshops and Trainings
  • Wednesday, Thursday, Friday: Main conference with talks, keynotes, exhibition
  • Saturday, Sunday: Sprints

More information will be available as we progress with the organization.

PS: We are now entering contract negotiations, so the above dates are highly likely, but we cannot confirm 100% yet.

Enjoy,

EuroPython Society

Categories: FLOSS Project Planets

Drupal Association blog: Q2 2017 Financial Statement Summary

Planet Drupal - Wed, 2017-11-15 10:32

The Drupal Association Board is responsible for the Drupal Association’s financial health and as part of their duty, they vote to approve monthly financial statements. The board met on September 23, 2017 at the board retreat that took place before DrupalCon Vienna and voted to approve the Q2 2017 financial statements that were prepared by our virtual CFO service, Summit CPA.

This blog walks you through our Q2 2017 Financials and how we performed against the two financial KPIs that we measure against each month:

  • Cash Reserve: Have a cash balance of 15-30% of Total Revenue

  • Net Income Profit Margin: End 2017 with a net income profit of 10%

Below is a summary of how we performed against our KPIs each month in the second quarter of 2017.

KPI Goal April May June Cash Reserve 15-30% 60% of goal 84% of goal 88% of goal Net Income Margin (NIM) % 10% 49.9% -29.8% -48.9%

The table above shows that Q2 was strong as a whole, due to the big income assist DrupalCon Baltimore gave.

With May and June below the KPI goal, we reviewed the entire quarter results as a whole. The quarter was buoyed by DrupalCon Baltimore which produced a majority of the $2,328,367 in April’s revenue and after its expenses, April landed $1,163,390 in net income. Following DrupalCon, May and June collectively accounted for $542,530 in revenue, producing a $214,711 net loss. When taken in total, we generated revenue of $2,870,897 and net income of $948,679. This equates to a NIM of 33.04% for the second quarter measuring above the net income margin goal.

You can see we did not achieve our cash reserve goal this quarter. The Drupal Association is still in its financial turn around so we did not meet our goal for the second quarter, however we are much closer to doing so than we have been in the past.

This chart below shows how cash reserves are building in Q2 and getting closer to hitting the cash reserve goal for this quarter.

Monthly Updates

April results toward our KPIs had us holding $1.2M in cash, which is 84% of the stated cash reserve goal.  Due to DrupalCon Baltimore reporting strong sales in both trainings and general conference tickets, we resulted in 49.9% of net income KPI.  Expenses for DrupalCon Baltimore came in lower, catering had significant savings of $50K.

For May, our cash reserve goal increased 11% through additional sales in Digital Sponsorships programs and DrupalCon ticket sales.  May expenses had DrupalCon Baltimore $15.8k less than forecasted, and IT had some savings in their budget as well, which helped cash reserves. 

June had costs from Baltimore which lowered net income by $70k than originally forecasted. This was seen in event production costs that were $100k higher than anticipated, along with an unanticipated $14k in professional expenses. Reducing the impact of those costs, income in other programs came in $55k higher, the majority being rebates from DrupalCon Baltimore. This impacted the cash reserve KPI, where we reached 88% of our goal.

We would not be able to do our mission-driven work without the support and contributions of our community. Contributions come in many forms, through the purchase of DrupalCon tickets and event sponsorships, through our Supporters and Members, Drupal.org sponsors, recruiters who post jobs on Drupal Jobs and many other fantastic ways our community supports the Drupal eco-system. We are deeply grateful for everyone who contributes their time, talent, and treasure to move Drupal forward.

Thank you!

File attachments:  june cash reserve.jpeg
Categories: FLOSS Project Planets

Valuebound: Migrating Address Book in Drupal 8 website using Process plugin

Planet Drupal - Wed, 2017-11-15 08:17

Migration is a term, which all the developers who have started working in Drupal 8 have gone through once at least in their development cycle. Migration can be done of many things like site migration (i.e migrate from Drupal 7 to Drupal 8), user migration, content migration. In simple terms, we can migrate all types of entity in Drupal 8.

How this migration works:

Migrate works by reading a row from a source plugin then running each property through a pipeline of Process plugins thus, resulting in a row to a destination plugin.

Why we write Process plugin?

Each Process…

Categories: FLOSS Project Planets

ADCI Solutions: Drupal Cafe #16: how it was?

Planet Drupal - Wed, 2017-11-15 05:50

Drupal is the big community where each member wants to share his or her experience with others. That’s why there are a lot of Drupal events. We held one of them.

 

Check how Drupal Cafes are done in Russia.

 

 

Categories: FLOSS Project Planets

FeatherCast: OSS Prague, Going Modular: Turning Legacy Docs into User Story Based Content, Robert Krátký

Planet Apache - Wed, 2017-11-15 04:53

During the Open Source Summit in Prague, we spoke to Robert Krátký, Principal Technnical Writer from Red Hat about his presentation about documentation. His talk focussed on the benefits of user stories and how existing legacy feature based documentation  can be converted into user stories.

https://feathercastapache.files.wordpress.com/2017/10/kratky_001.mp3

Robert’s presentation can be found at the following  here and and the the documentation resources mentioned at the link below:

https://github.com/redhat-documentation/modular-docs


Categories: FLOSS Project Planets
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