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Jonathan Wiltshire: RC candidate of the day (2)

Wed, 2019-05-22 13:00

Sometimes the list of release-critical bugs is overwhelming, and it’s hard to find something to tackle.

Today’s invitation is to review and perhaps upload the patch included in bug #928883.

Categories: FLOSS Project Planets

Thomas Goirand: Wrote a Debian mirror setup puppet module in 3 hours

Wed, 2019-05-22 08:40

As I needed the functionality, I wrote this:

https://salsa.debian.org/openstack-team/puppet/puppet-module-debian-archvsync

The matching Debian package has been uploaded and is now in the NEW queue. Thanks a lot to Waldi for packaging ftpsync, which I’m using.

Comments and contributions are welcome.

Categories: FLOSS Project Planets

Petter Reinholdtsen: Nikita version 0.4 released - free software archive API server

Wed, 2019-05-22 05:30

This morning, a new release of Nikita Noark 5 core project was announced on the project mailing list. The Nikita free software solution is an implementation of the Norwegian archive standard Noark 5 used by government offices in Norway. These were the changes in version 0.4 since version 0.3, see the email link above for links to a demo site:

  • Roll out OData handling to all endpoints where applicable
  • Changed the relation key for "ny-journalpost" to the official one.
  • Better link generation on outgoing links.
  • Tidy up code and make code and approaches more consistent throughout the codebase
  • Update rels to be in compliance with updated version in the interface standard
  • Avoid printing links on empty objects as they can't have links
  • Small bug fixes and improvements
  • Start moving generation of outgoing links to @Service layer so access control can be used when generating links
  • Log exception that was being swallowed so it's traceable
  • Fix name mapping problem
  • Update templated printing so templated should only be printed if it is set true. Requires more work to roll out across entire application.
  • Remove Record->DocumentObject as per domain model of n5v4
  • Add ability to delete lists filtered with OData
  • Return NO_CONTENT (204) on delete as per interface standard
  • Introduce support for ConstraintViolationException exception
  • Make Service classes extend NoarkService
  • Make code base respect X-Forwarded-Host, X-Forwarded-Proto and X-Forwarded-Port
  • Update CorrespondencePart* code to be more in line with Single Responsibility Principle
  • Make package name follow directory structure
  • Make sure Document number starts at 1, not 0
  • Fix isues discovered by FindBugs
  • Update from Date to ZonedDateTime
  • Fix wrong tablename
  • Introduce Service layer tests
  • Improvements to CorrespondencePart
  • Continued work on Class / Classificationsystem
  • Fix feature where authors were stored as storageLocations
  • Update HQL builder for OData
  • Update OData search capability from webpage

If free and open standardized archiving API sound interesting to you, please contact us on IRC (#nikita on irc.freenode.net) or email (nikita-noark mailing list).

As usual, if you use Bitcoin and want to show your support of my activities, please send Bitcoin donations to my address 15oWEoG9dUPovwmUL9KWAnYRtNJEkP1u1b.

Categories: FLOSS Project Planets

Molly de Blanc: remuneration

Tue, 2019-05-21 17:08

I am a leader in free software. As evidence for this claim, I like to point out that I once finagled an invitation to the Google OSCON luminaries dinner, and was once invited to a Facebook party for open source luminaries.

In spite of my humor, I am a leader and have taken on leadership roles for a number of years. I was in charge of guests of honor (and then some) at Penguicon for several years at the start of my involvement in FOSS. I’m a delegate on the Debian Outreach team. My participation in Debian A-H is a leadership role as well. I’m president of the OSI Board of Directors. I’ve given keynote presentations on two continents, and talks on four. And that’s not even getting into my paid professional life. My compensated labor has been nearly exclusively for nonprofits.

Listing my credentials in such concentration feels a bit distasteful, but sometimes I think it’s important. Right now, I want to convey that I know a thing or two about free/open source leadership. I’ve even given talks on that.

Other than my full-time job, my leadership positions come without material renumeration — that is to say I don’t get paid for any of them — though I’ve accepted many a free meal and have had travel compensated on a number of occasions. I am not interested in getting paid for my leadership work, though I have come to believe that more leadership positions should be paid.

One of my criticisms about unpaid project/org leadership positions is that they are so time consuming it means that the people who can do the jobs are:

  • students
  • contractors
  • unemployed
  • those with few to no other responsibilities
  • those with very supportive partners
  • those with very supportive employers
  • those who don’t need much sleep
  • those with other forms of financial privilege

I have few responsibilities beyond some finicky plants and Bash (my cat). I also have extremely helpful roommates and modern technology (e.g. automatic feeders) that assist with these things while traveling. I can spend my evenings and weekends holed up in my office plugging away on my free software work. I have a lot of freedom and flexibility — economic, social, professional — that affords me this opportunity. Very few of us do.

This is is a problem! One solution is to pay more leadership positions; another is to have these projects hire someone in an executive director-like capacity and turn their leadership roles into advisory roles; or replace the positions with committees (the problem with the latter is that most committees still have/need a leader).

Diversity is good.

The time requirements for leadership roles severely limit the pool of potential participants. This limits the perspectives and experiences brought to the positions — and diversity in experience is widely considered to be good. People from underrepresented backgrounds generally overlap with marginalized communities — including ethnic, geographic, gender, race, and socio-economic minorities.

Volunteer work is not “more pure.”

One of the arguments for not paying people for these positions is that their motives will be more pure if they are doing it as a volunteer — because they aren’t “in it for the money.“ I would argue that your motives can be less pure if you aren’t being paid for your labor.

In mission-driven nonprofits, you want as much of your funding as possible to come from individual or community donors rather than corporate sponsors. You want the number of individual and community donors and members to be greater than that of your sponsors. You want to ensure you have enough money that should a corporate sponsor drop you (or you drop them), you are still in a sustainable position. You want to do this so that you are not beholden to any of your corporate or government sponsors. Freeing yourself from corporate influence allows you to focus on the mission of your work.

When searching for a volunteer leader, you need to look at them as a mission-driven nonprofit. Ask: What are their conflicts of interest? What happens if their employers pull away their support? What sort of financial threats are they susceptible to?

In a capitalist system, when someone is being paid for their labor, they are able to prioritize that labor. Adequate compensation enables a person to invest more fully in their work. When your responsibilities as the leader of a free software project, for which you are unpaid, come into direct conflict with the interests of your employer, who is going to win?

Note, however, that it’s important to make sure the funding to pay your leadership does not come with strings attached so that your work isn’t contingent upon any particular sponsor or set of sponsors getting what they want.

It’s a lot of work. Like, a lot of work.

By turning a leadership role into a job (even a part-time one), the associated labor can be prioritized over other labor. Many volunteer leadership positions require the same commitment as a part-time job, and some can be close to if not actually full-time jobs.

Someone’s full-time employer needs to be supportive of their volunteer leadership activities. I have some flexibility in the schedule for my day job, so I can plan meetings with people who are doing their day jobs, or in different time zones, that will work for them. Not everyone has this flexibility when they have a full-time job that isn’t their leadership role. Many people in leadership roles — I know past presidents of the OSI and previous Debian Project Leaders who will attest to this — are only able to do so because their employer allows them to shift their work schedule in order to do their volunteer work. Even when you’re “just” attending meetings, you’re doing so either with your employer giving you the time off, or using your PTO to do so.

A few final thoughts.

Many of us live in capitalist societies. One of the ways you show respect for someone’s labor is by paying them for it. This isn’t to say I think all FOSS contributions should be paid (though some argue they ought to be!), but that certain things require levels of dedication that go significantly above and beyond that which is reasonable. Our free software leaders are incredible, and we need to change how we recognize that.

(Please note that I don’t feel as though I should be paid for any of my leadership roles and, in fact, have reasons why I believe they should be unpaid.)

Categories: FLOSS Project Planets

Jonathan Wiltshire: RC candidate of the day (1)

Tue, 2019-05-21 14:39

Sometimes the list of release-critical bugs is overwhelming, and it’s hard to find something to tackle.

So I invite you to have a go at #928040, which may only be a case of reviewing and uploading the included patch.

Categories: FLOSS Project Planets

Enrico Zini: Self-care links

Tue, 2019-05-21 11:13
Categories: FLOSS Project Planets

Raphaël Hertzog: Freexian’s report about Debian Long Term Support, April 2019

Tue, 2019-05-21 10:11

Like each month, here comes a report about the work of paid contributors to Debian LTS.

Individual reports

In April, 204 work hours have been dispatched among 14 paid contributors. Their reports are available:

  • Abhijith PA did 4 hours (out of 14 hours allocated, thus carrying over 10 hours to May).
  • Adrian Bunk did 8 hours (out of 8 hours allocated).
  • Ben Hutchings did 31.25 hours (out of 17.25 hours allocated plus 14 extra hours from April).
  • Brian May did 10 hours (out of 10 hours allocated).
  • Chris Lamb did 17 hours (out of 17.25 hours allocated, thus carrying over 0.25h to May).
  • Emilio Pozuelo Monfort did 8 hours (out of 17.25 hours allocated + 6 extra hours from March, thus carrying over 15.25h to May).
  • Hugo Lefeuvre did 17.25 hours.
  • Jonas Meurer did 14 hours (out of 14 hours allocated).
  • Markus Koschany did 17.25 hours.
  • Mike Gabriel did 11.5 hours (out of 17.25 hours allocated, thus carrying over 5.75h to May).
  • Ola Lundqvist did 5.5 hours (out of 8 hours allocated + 1.5 extra hours from last month, thus carrying over 4h to May).
  • Roberto C. Sanchez did 1.75 hours (out of 12 hours allocated, thus carrying over 10.25h to May).
  • Sylvain Beucler did 17.25 hours.
  • Thorsten Alteholz did 17.25 hours.
Evolution of the situation

During this month, and after a two-year break, Jonas Meurer became again an active LTS contributor. Still, we continue to be looking for new contributors. Please contact Holger if you are interested to become a paid LTS contributor.

The number of sponsors did not change. There are 58 organizations sponsoring 215 work hours per month.

The security tracker currently lists 33 packages with a known CVE and the dla-needed.txt file has 31 packages needing an update.

Thanks to our sponsors

New sponsors are in bold.

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Categories: FLOSS Project Planets

Neil Williams: New directions

Mon, 2019-05-20 10:15

It's been a difficult time, the last few months, but I've finally got some short updates.

First, in two short weeks I will be gainfully employed again at (UltraSoc) as Senior Software Tester, developing test framework solutions for SoC debugging, including on RISC-V. Despite vast numbers of discussions with a long list of recruitment agences, success came from a face to face encounter at a local Job Fair. Many thanks to Cambridge Network for hosting the event.

Second, I've finally accepted that https://www.codehelp.co.uk was too old to retain and I'm simply redirecting the index page to this blog. The old codehelp site hasn't kept up with new technology and the CSS handles modern screen resolutions particularly badly. I don't expect that many people were finding the PHP and XML content useful, let alone the now redundant WML content. In time, I'll add redirects to the other codehelp.co.uk pages.

Third, my job hunting has shown that the centralisation of decentralised version control is still a thing. As far as recruitment is concerned, if the code isn't visible on GitHub, it doesn't exist. (It's not the recruitment agencies asking for GitHub links, it is the company HR departments themselves.) So I had to add a bunch of projects to GitHub and there's a link now in the blog.

Time to pick up some Debian work again, well after I pay a visit or two to the Cambridge Beer Festival 2019, of course.

Categories: FLOSS Project Planets

Dirk Eddelbuettel: digest 0.6.19

Mon, 2019-05-20 07:48

Overnight, digest version 0.6.19 arrived on CRAN. It will get uploaded to Debian in due course.

digest creates hash digests of arbitrary R objects (using the md5, sha-1, sha-256, sha-512, crc32, xxhash32, xxhash64, murmur32, and spookyhash algorithms) permitting easy comparison of R language objects.

This version contains two new functions adding new digest functionality. First, Dmitriy Selivanov added a fast and vectorized digest2int to convert (arbitrary) strings into 32 bit integers using one-at-a-time hashing. Second, Kendon Bell, over a series of PRs, put together a nice implementation of spookyhash as a first streaming hash algorithm in digest. So big thanks to both Dmitriy and Kendon.

No other changes were made.

CRANberries provides the usual summary of changes to the previous version.

For questions or comments use the issue tracker off the GitHub repo.

This post by Dirk Eddelbuettel originated on his Thinking inside the box blog. Please report excessive re-aggregation in third-party for-profit settings.

Categories: FLOSS Project Planets

Candy Tsai: Outreachy 2019 March-August Internship – The Application Process

Mon, 2019-05-20 05:57
Blah: Introduction

Really excited to be accepted for the project “Debian Continuous Integration: user experience improvements” (referred to as debci in this post) of the 2019 March-August round of the Outreachy internship! A huge thanks to my company and my manager Frank for letting me do this since I mentioned it out of the blue. Thanks to the Women Techmakers community for letting me know this program exists.

There are already blog posts that also has an introduction of the program, such as:

  1. How I got into Mozilla’s Outreachy open source internship program
  2. My Pathway to Outreachy with Mozilla
  3. Outreachy: What? How? Why?

To me, the biggest difference between Outreachy and Google Summer of Code (GSoC) is that you don’t have to be a student in order to apply.

This post won’t be going into the details of “What is Outreachy” in this post, and will focus on the process, where everyone will have a different story. This is my version, and hope that you can find yours in the near future!

Table of contents: Goals: The Why

What I like about Outreachy’s application process is that it definitely lets you think about why you want to apply. For me, things were pretty simple and straightforward:

  • Experience what it is like to work remotely
  • Use my current knowledge to contribute to open source
  • Learn something different from my current job

Actually the most important reason that I kind of feel bad mentioning here is that I felt like leaving the male-dominated tech space for a bit. My colleagues are really nice and friendly, but… it’s hard to put into words.

Mindset: Start Right Away

The two main reasons I failed in the past:

  1. Hesitation
  2. Spent too much time browsing the project list
Hesitation

I have known about the Outreachy since 2017, but because it requires you to make a few contributions in order to apply, any bit of hesitation will result in a late start. It was a bit scary to approach the project mentors and thought my code has to be perfect in order to make a contribution. The truth is, without discussion, you might not know the details of the issue, hence you can’t even start coding. Almost every accepted applicant mentions the importance of starting early. To be precise, just start at the day when applications are open.

Spent too much time browsing the project list

Another reason that kept me from starting right away was that I had been browsing the project list for too long. Since the project list on the first day is not complete, it means that there will be projects that I might be more interested in joining the list as the time passes. Past projects can be referenced to get a better picture of which organizations were involved, but it is never a 100% sure bet. Also, the organizations participating for the March-August round is different from the December-March round. To avoid the starting too late scenario, the strategy I used was to choose 2 projects to contribute to. One in the initial phase (first week or so), and another during the following weeks.

Strategy: Choose 2 Projects

Choosing how many projects to work on really depends on the time you have available. The main idea of this strategy was to eliminate the cause of spending too much time on browsing the project list. Since already having a full-time job at the time, I really had to weigh my priorities. To be honest, I barely had time to work on the second project.

On the day the project list was announced, I quickly assessed my skills with the projects available and decided to try applying for Mozilla. Yep, you heard me right, my first choice wasn’t Debian because Mozilla seemed more familiar to me. Then I instantly realized that there were a flooding number of applicants also applying for Mozilla. All of the newcomer issues were claimed and it all happened in just a matter of days!

I started to look for other projects that were also in line with my goals, which led me to debci. Never have I used Ruby in projects and neither the Debian system. On the other hand, I’m familiar with the other skills listed in the requirements, so some of my knowledge can still be utilized.

The second project was announced at a later stage and came from Openstack. Had to admit it was a little too hard for me to setup the Ironic baremetal environment so wasn’t able to put in much.

Plan: Learn About the Community

An important aspect through the application process was to get in touch with the community. Although Debci and Openstack Ironic both use IRC chat, it feels very different. From a wiki search, it seems Openstack is backed by a corporate entity while Debian by volunteers.

Despite the difference, both communities were pretty active with Openstack involving more members. As long as the community was active and friendly, it fits the vision I was looking for.

Execution: Communication

Looking back at the contribution process, it actually took more time than I initially imagined. The whole application process consists of three stages:

  1. Initial application: has to wait a few days for it to be approved
  2. Record Contributions: the main part
  3. Final application: final dash

Except for the initial application, which can be done by myself, the rest involves communicating with others. Communication differs a lot compared to an office environment. My first merge request (a.k.a. pull request) had a ton of comments, and I couldn’t understand what the comments were suggesting at first. It became to clear up after some discussion and I was really excited to have it being merged. This was huge for me since this all happened online, which contains a bit of a time lag since in an office environment, my colleague would just come around for a face-to-face discussion.

TL;DR

Had no idea that so many words were written, so guess I will stop for now. Up until now, I haven’t mentioned much about writing code and that’s because you will feel for yourself whether you can get through during the process. So the TL;DR version of this post is:

  • Do not hesitate, just do it
  • Start as soon as applications are open
  • Do not lurk around the project list
  • Get in touch with the community and mentors
  • Communicate about the issues

Really excited to begin this Outreachy journey with debci and grateful for this opportunity. Stay tuned for more articles about the project itself!

Categories: FLOSS Project Planets

Bits from Debian: Lenovo Platinum Sponsor of DebConf19

Mon, 2019-05-20 04:00

We are very pleased to announce that Lenovo has committed to supporting DebConf19 as a Platinum sponsor.

"Lenovo is proud to sponsor the 20th Annual Debian Conference." said Egbert Gracias, Senior Software Development Manager at Lenovo. "We’re excited to see, up close, the great work being done in the community and to meet the developers and volunteers that keep the Debian Project moving forward!”

Lenovo is a global technology leader manufacturing a wide portfolio of connected products, including smartphones, tablets, PCs and workstations as well as AR/VR devices, smart home/office solutions and data center solutions.

With this commitment as Platinum Sponsor, Lenovo is contributing to make possible our annual conference, and directly supporting the progress of Debian and Free Software, helping to strengthen the community that continues to collaborate on Debian projects throughout the rest of the year.

Thank you very much Lenovo, for your support of DebConf19!

Become a sponsor too!

DebConf19 is still accepting sponsors. Interested companies and organizations may contact the DebConf team through sponsors@debconf.org, and visit the DebConf19 website at https://debconf19.debconf.org.

Categories: FLOSS Project Planets

Keith Packard: itsybitsy-snek

Mon, 2019-05-20 03:17
ItsyBitsy Snek — snek on the Adafruit ItsyBitsy

I got an ItsyBitsy board from Adafruit a few days ago. This board is about as minimal an Arduino-compatible device as I can imagine. All it's got is an Atmel ATmega 32U4 SoC, one LED, and a few passive components.

I'd done a bit of work with the 32u4 under AltOS a few years ago when Bdale and I built a 'companion' board called TeleScience for TeleMetrum to try and measure rocket airframe temperatures in flight. So, I already had some basic drivers for some of the peripherals, including a USB driver.

USB Adventures

The 32u4 USB hardware is simple, and actually fairly easy to use. The AltOS driver used a separate thread to manage the setup messages on endpoint 0. I didn't imagine I'd have space for threading on this device, so I modified that USB driver to manage setup processing from the interrupt handler. I'd done that on a bunch of other USB parts, so while it took longer than I'd hoped, I did manage to get it working.

Then I spent a whole bunch of time reducing the code size of this driver. It started at about 2kB and is now almost down to 1kB. It's a bit less robust now; hosts sending odd setup messages may get unexpected results.

The last thing I did was to add a FIFO for OUT data. That's because we want to be able to see ^C keystrokes even while Snek is executing code.

Reset as longjmp

On the ATmega 328P, to reset Snek, I just reset the whole chip. Nice and clean. With integrated USB, I can't reset the chip without losing the USB connection, and that would be pretty annoying. Resetting Snek's state back to startup would take a pile of code, so instead, I gathered all of the snek-related .data and .bss variables by changing the linker script. Then, I wrote a reset function that does pretty much what the libc startup code does and then jumps back to main:

snek_poly_t snek_builtin_reset(void) { /* reset data */ memcpy_P(&__snek_data_start__, (&__text_end__ + (&__snek_data_start__ - &__data_start__)), &__snek_data_end__ - &__snek_data_start__); /* reset bss */ memset(&__snek_bss_start__, '\0', &__snek_bss_end__ - &__snek_bss_start__); /* and off we go! */ longjmp(snek_reset_buf, 1); return SNEK_NULL; }

I still need to write code to reset the GPIO pins.

Development Environment

To flash firmware to the device, I stuck the board into a proto board and ran jumpers from my AVRISP cable to the board.

Next, I hooked up a FTDI USB to Serial converter to the 32u4 TX/RX pins. Serial is always easier than USB, and this was certainly the case here.

Finally, I dug out my trusty Beagle USB analyzer. This lets me see every USB packet going between the host and the device and is invaluable for debugging USB issues.

You can see all of these pieces in the picture above. They're sitting on top of a knitting colorwork pattern of snakes and pyramids, which I may have to make something out of.

Current Status

Code for this part is on the master branch, which is available on my home machine as well as github:

I think this is the last major task to finish before I release snek version 1.0. I really wanted to see if I could get snek running on this tiny target. It's nearly there; I want to squeeze a few more things onto this chip.

Categories: FLOSS Project Planets

Petter Reinholdtsen: MIME type "text/vnd.sosi" for SOSI map data

Mon, 2019-05-20 02:35

As part of my involvement in the work to standardise a REST based API for Noark 5, the Norwegian archiving standard, I spent some time the last few months to try to register a MIME type and PRONOM code for the SOSI file format. The background is that there is a set of formats approved for long term storage and archiving in Norway, and among these formats, SOSI is the only format missing a MIME type and PRONOM code.

What is SOSI, you might ask? To quote Wikipedia: SOSI is short for Samordnet Opplegg for Stedfestet Informasjon (literally "Coordinated Approach for Spatial Information", but more commonly expanded in English to Systematic Organization of Spatial Information). It is a text based file format for geo-spatial vector information used in Norway. Information about the SOSI format can be found in English from Wikipedia. The specification is available in Norwegian from the Norwegian mapping authority. The SOSI standard, which originated in the beginning of nineteen eighties, was the inspiration and formed the basis for the XML based Geography Markup Language.

I have so far written a pattern matching rule for the file(1) unix tool to recognize SOSI files, submitted a request to the PRONOM project to have a PRONOM ID assigned to the format (reference TNA1555078202S60), and today send a request to IANA to register the "text/vnd.sosi" MIME type for this format (referanse IANA #1143144). If all goes well, in a few months, anyone implementing the Noark 5 Tjenestegrensesnitt API spesification should be able to use an official MIME type and PRONOM code for SOSI files. In addition, anyone using SOSI files on Linux should be able to automatically recognise the format and web sites handing out SOSI files can begin providing a more specific MIME type. So far, SOSI files has been handed out from web sites using the "application/octet-stream" MIME type, which is just a nice way of stating "I do not know". Soon, we will know. :)

As usual, if you use Bitcoin and want to show your support of my activities, please send Bitcoin donations to my address 15oWEoG9dUPovwmUL9KWAnYRtNJEkP1u1b.

Categories: FLOSS Project Planets

Louis-Philippe Véronneau: Am I Fomu ?

Sun, 2019-05-19 17:30

A few months ago at FOSDEM 2019 I got my hands on a pre-production version of the Fomu, a tiny open-hardware FPGA board that fits in your USB port. Building on the smash hit of the Tomu, the Fomu uses an ICE40UP5K FPGA instead of an ARM core.

I've never really been into hardware hacking, and much like hacking on the Linux kernel, messing with wires and soldering PCB boards always intimidated me. From my perspective, playing around with the Fomu looked like a nice way to test the water without drowning in it.

Since the bootloader wasn't written at the time, when I first got my Fomu hacker board there was no easy way to test if the board was working. Lucky for me, Giovanni Mascellani was around and flashed a test program on it using his Raspberry Pi and a bunch of hardware probes. I was really impressed by the feat, but it also seemed easy enough that I could do it.

Back at home, I ordered a Raspberry Pi, bought some IC hooks and borrowed a soldering iron from my neighbour. It had been a while since I had soldered anything! Last time I did I was 14 years old and trying to save a buck making my own fencing mask and body cords...

My goal was to test foboot, the new DFU-compatible bootloader recently written by Sean Cross (xobs) to make flashing programs on the board more convenient. Replicating Giovanni's setup, I flashed the Fomu Raspbian image on my Pi and compiled the bootloader.

It took me a good 15 minutes to connect the IC hooks to the board, but I was successfully able to flash foboot on the Fomu! The board now greets me with:

[ 9751.556784] usb 8-2.4: new full-speed USB device number 31 using xhci_hcd [ 9751.841038] usb 8-2.4: New USB device found, idVendor=1209, idProduct=70b1, bcdDevice= 1.01 [ 9751.841043] usb 8-2.4: New USB device strings: Mfr=1, Product=2, SerialNumber=0 [ 9751.841046] usb 8-2.4: Product: Fomu Bootloader (0) v1.4-2-g1913767 [ 9751.841049] usb 8-2.4: Manufacturer: Kosagi

I don't have a use case for the Fomu yet, but I am sure by the time the production version ships out, people will have written interesting programs I can flash on it. In the meantime, it'll blink slowly in my laptop's USB port.

Categories: FLOSS Project Planets

Joey Hess: 80 percent

Sun, 2019-05-19 12:43

I added dh to debhelper a decade ago, and now Debian is considering making use of dh mandatory. Not being part of Debian anymore, I'm in the position of needing to point out something important about it anyway. So this post is less about pointing in a specific direction as giving a different angle to think about things.

debhelper was intentionally designed as a 100% solution for simplifying building Debian packages. Any package it's used with gets simplified and streamlined and made less a bother to maintain. The way debhelper succeeds at 100% is not by doing everything, but by being usable in little pieces, that build up to a larger, more consistent whole, but that can just as well be used sparingly.

dh was intentionally not designed to be a 100% solution, because it is not a collection of little pieces, but a framework. I first built an 80% solution, which is the canned sequences of commands it runs plus things like dh_auto_build that guess at how to build any software. Then I iterated to get closer to 100%. The main iteration was override targets in the debian/rules file, to let commands be skipped or run out of order or with options. That closed dh's gap by a further 80%.

So, dh is probably somewhere around a 96% solution now. It may have crept closer still to 100%, but it seems likely there is still a gap, because it was never intended to completely close the gap.

Starting at 100% and incrementally approaching 100% are very different design choices. The end results can look very similar, since in both cases it can appear that nearly everyone has settled on doing things in the same way. I feel though, that the underlying difference is important.

PS: It's perhaps worth re-reading the original debhelper email and see how much my original problems with debstd would also apply to dh if its use were mandatory!

Categories: FLOSS Project Planets

Dirk Eddelbuettel: RQuantLib 0.4.9: Another small updates

Sun, 2019-05-19 09:28

A new version 0.4.9 of RQuantLib reached CRAN and Debian. It completes the change of some internals of RQuantLib to follow suit to an upstream change in QuantLib. We can now seamlessly switch between shared_ptr<> from Boost and from C++11 – Luigi wrote about the how and why in an excellent blog post that is part of a larger (and also excellent) series of posts on QuantLib internals.

QuantLib is a very comprehensice free/open-source library for quantitative finance, and RQuantLib connects it to the R environment and language.

The complete set of changes is listed below:

Changes in RQuantLib version 0.4.9 (2019-05-15)
  • Changes in RQuantLib code:

    • Completed switch to QuantLib::ext namespace wrappers for either shared_ptr use started in 0.4.8.

Courtesy of CRANberries, there is also a diffstat report for the this release. As always, more detailed information is on the RQuantLib page. Questions, comments etc should go to the new rquantlib-devel mailing list. Issue tickets can be filed at the GitHub repo.

This post by Dirk Eddelbuettel originated on his Thinking inside the box blog. Please report excessive re-aggregation in third-party for-profit settings.

Categories: FLOSS Project Planets

Andrew Cater: systemd.unit=rescue.target

Sun, 2019-05-19 07:17
Just another quick one liner: a Grub config argument which I had to dig for but which is really useful when this sort of thing happens

Faced with a server that was rebooting after an upgrade and dropping to sytemd emergency target:

Rebooting and adding

ssytemd.unit=rescue.target

to the end of the Linux command line in the Grub config as the machine booted and then pressing F10 allowed me to drop to a full featured rescue environment with read/write access to the disk and to sort out the partial upgrade mess.
Categories: FLOSS Project Planets

David Kalnischkies: Newbie contributor: A decade later

Sun, 2019-05-19 06:34

Time flies. On this day, 10 years ago, a certain someone sent in his first contribution to Debian in Debbugs#433007: --dry-run can mark a package manually installed (in real life). What follows is me babbling randomly about what lead to and happened after that first patch.

That wasn't my first contribution to open source: I implemented (more like copy-pasted) mercurial support in the VCS plugin in the editor I was using back in 2008: Geany – I am pretty sure my code is completely replaced by now, I just remain being named in THANKS, which is very nice considering I am not a user anymore. My contributions to apt were coded in vim(-nox) already.

It was the first time I put my patch under public scrutiny through – my contribution to geanyvc was by private mail to the plugin maintainer – and not by just anyone but by the venerable masters operating in a mailing list called deity@…

I had started looking into apt code earlier and had even written some patches for me without actually believing that I would go as far as handing them in. Some got in anyhow later, like the first commit with my name dated May the 7th allowing codenames to be used in pinning which dates manpage changes as being written on the 4th. So then I really started with apt is lost to history by now, but today (a decade ago) I got serious: I joined IRC, the mailing list and commented the bugreport mentioned above. I even pushed my branch of random things I had done to apt to launchpad (which back then was hosting the bzr repository).

The response was overwhelming. The bugreport has no indication of it, but Michael jumped at me. I realized only later that he was the only remaining active team member in the C++ parts. Julian was mostly busy with Python at the time and Christian turned out to be Mr. L18n with duties all around Debian. The old guard had left as well as the old-old guard before them.

I got quickly entangled in everything. Michael made sure I got invited by Canonical to UDS-L in November of 2009 – 6 months after saying hi. I still can't really believe that 21y old me made his first-ever fly across the ocean to Dallas, Texas (USA) because some people on the internet invited him over. So there was I, standing in front of the airport with the slow realisation that while I had been busy being scared about the fly, the week and everything I never really had worried about how to get from the airport to the hotel. An inner monologue started: "You got this, you just need the name of the hotel and look for a taxi. You wrote the name down right? No? Okay, you can remember the name anyhow, right? Just say it and … why are you so silent? Say it! … Goddammit, you are …" – "David?" was interrupting my inner voice. Of all people in the world, I happened to meet Michael for the first time right in front of the airport. "Just as planned you meany inner voice", I was kidding myself after getting in a taxi with a few more people.

I meet so many people over the following days! It was kinda scary, very taxing for an introvert but also 100% fun. I also meet the project that would turn me from promising newbie contributor to APT developer via Google Summer of Code 2010: MultiArch. There was a session about it and this time around it should really happen. I was sitting in the back, hiding but listening closely. Thankfully nobody had called me out as I was scared: I can't remember who it was, but someone said that in dpkg MultiArch could be added in two weeks. Nobody had to say it, for me it was clear that this meant APT would be the blocker as that most definitely would not happen in two weeks. Not even months. More like years if at all. What was I to do? Cut my looses and run? Na, sunk cost fallacy be damned. I hadn't lost anything, I had learned and enjoyed plenty of things granted to me by supercow and that seemed like a good opportunity to give back.

But there was so much to do. The cache had to grow dynamically (remember "mmap ran out of room" and feel old), commandline interfaces needed to be adapted, the resolver… oh my god, the resolver! And to top it all of APT had no tests to speak of. So after the UDS I started tackling them all: My weekly reports for GSoC2010 provide a glimpse into the abyss but before and after lots happened still. Many of the decisions I made back then are still powering APT. The shell scripting framework I wrote to be able to perform some automatic testing of apt as I got quickly tired of manual testing consists as of today of 255 scripts run not only by me but many CI services including autopkgtest. It probably prevented me from introducing thousands of regressions over the years. Even through it grew into kind of a monster (2000+ lines of posix shellscript providing the test framework alone), can be a bit slow (it can take more than the default 30min on salsa; for me locally it is about 3 minutes) and it has a strange function naming convention (all lowercase no separator: e.g. insertinstalledpackage). Nobody said you can't make mistakes.

And I made them all: First bug caused by me. First regression with complains hitting d-devel. First security bug. It was always scary. It still is, especially as simple probability kicks in and the numbers increase combined with seemingly more hate generated on the internet: The last security bug had people identify me as purposefully malicious. All my contributions should be removed – reading that made me smile.

Lots and lots of things happened since my first patch. git tells me that 174+ people contributed to APT over the years. The top 5 of contributors of all time (as of today) list:

  • 2904 commits by Michael Vogt (active mostly as wizard)
  • 2647 commits by David Kalnischkies (active)
  • 1304 commits by Arch Librarian (all retired, see note)
  • 1008 commits by Julian Andres Klode (active)
  • 641 commits by Christian Perrier (retired)

Note that "Arch Librarian" isn't a person, but a conversion artefact: Development started in 1998 in CVS which was later converted to arch (which eventually turned into bzr) and this CVS→arch conversion preserved the names of the initial team as CVS call signs in the commit messages only. Many of them belong hence to Jason Gunthorpe (jgg). Christians commits meanwhile are often times imports of po files for others, but there is still lots of work involved with this so that spot is well earned even if nowadays with git we have the possibility of attributing the translator not only in the changelog but also as author in the commit.

There is a huge gap after the top 5 with runner up Matt Zimmerman with 116 counted commits (but some Arch Librarian commits are his, too). And that gap for me to claim the throne isn't that small either, but I am working on it… 😉︎ I have also put enough distance between me and Julian that it will still take a while for him to catch up even if he is trying hard at the moment.

The next decade will be interesting: Various changes are queuing up in the master branch for a major break in ABI and API and a bunch of new stuff is still in the pipeline or on the drawing board. Some of these things I patched in all these years ago never made it into apt so far: I intend to change that this decade – you are supposed to have read this in "to the moon" style and erupt in a mighty cheer now so that you can't hear the following – time permitting, as so far this is all talk on my part.

The last year(s) had me not contribute as much as I would have liked due to – pardon my french – crazy shit I will hopefully be able to leave behind this (or at least next) year. I hadn't thought it would show that drastically in the stats, but looking back it is kinda obvious:

  • In year 2009 David made 167 commits
  • In year 2010 David made 395 commits
  • In year 2011 David made 378 commits
  • In year 2012 David made 274 commits
  • In year 2013 David made 161 commits
  • In year 2014 David made 352 commits
  • In year 2015 David made 333 commits
  • In year 2016 David made 381 commits
  • In year 2017 David made 110 commits
  • In year 2018 David made 78 commits
  • In year 2019 David made 18 commits so far

Lets make that number great again this year as I finally applied and got approved as DD in 2016 (I didn't want to apply earlier) and decreasing contributions (completely unrelated but still) since then aren't a proper response! 😉︎

Also: I enjoyed the many UDSes, the DebConfs and other events I got to participate in in the last decade and hope there are many more yet to come!

tl;dr: Looking back at the last decade made me realize that a) I seem to have a high luck stat, b) too few people contribute to apt given that I remain the newest team member and c) I love working on apt for all the things which happened due to it. If only I could do that full-time like I did as part of summer of code…

P.S.: The series APT for … will return next week with a post I had promised months ago.

Categories: FLOSS Project Planets

Debian XMPP Team: Debian XMPP Team Starts a Blog

Fri, 2019-05-17 19:30

The Debian XMPP Team, the people who package Dino, Gajim, Mcabber, Movim, Profanity, Prosody, Psi+, Salut à Toi, Taningia, and a couple of other packages related to XMPP a.k.a. Jabber for Debian, have this blog now. We will try to post interesting stuff here — when it's ready!

Categories: FLOSS Project Planets

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