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Scarlett Gately Moore: Kubuntu: Noble Numbat Beta available! Qt6 snaps coming soon.

Fri, 2024-04-12 15:29

It has been a very busy couple of weeks as we worked against some major transitions and a security fix that required a rebuild of the $world. I am happy to report that against all odds we have a beta release! You can read all about it here: https://kubuntu.org/news/kubuntu-24-04-beta-released/ Post beta freeze I have already begun pushing our fixes for known issues today. A big one being our new branding! Very exciting times in the Kubuntu world.

In the snap world I will be using my free time to start knocking out KDE applications ( not covered by the project ). I have also recruited some help, so you should start seeing these pop up in the edge channel very soon!

Now that we are nearing the release of Noble Numbat, my contract is coming to an end with Kubuntu. If you would like to see Plasma 6 in the next release and in a PPA for Noble, please consider donating to extend my contract at https://kubuntu.org/donate !

On a personal level, I am still looking to help with my grandson and you can find that here: https://www.gofundme.com/f/in-loving-memory-of-william-billy-dean-scalf

Thanks for stopping by,

Scarlett

Categories: FLOSS Project Planets

NOKUBI Takatsugu: mailman3-web error when upgrading to bookworm

Fri, 2024-04-12 09:34

I tried to upgrade bullseye machien to bookworm, so I got the following error:

File “/usr/lib/python3/dist-packages/django/contrib/auth/mixins.py”, line 5, in
from django.contrib.auth.views import redirect_to_login
File “/usr/lib/python3/dist-packages/django/contrib/auth/views.py”, line 20, in
from django.utils.http import (
ImportError: cannot import name ‘url_has_allowed_host_and_scheme’ from ‘django.utils.http’ (/usr/lib/python3/dist-packages/django/utils/http.py)

During handling of the above exception, another exception occurred:

It is similar to #1000810, but it is already closed.

My solution is:

  • apt remove mailman3-web
    • keep db and config files (do not purge)
  • apt autoremove
    • remove django related packages
  • apt install mailman3-web mailman3-full

I tried to send to the report, but it rerutns `550 Unknown or archived bug’ …

Categories: FLOSS Project Planets

Freexian Collaborators: Debian Contributions: SSO Authentication for jitsi.debian.social, /usr-move updates, and more! (by Utkarsh Gupta)

Thu, 2024-04-11 20:00

Contributing to Debian is part of Freexian’s mission. This article covers the latest achievements of Freexian and their collaborators. All of this is made possible by organizations subscribing to our Long Term Support contracts and consulting services.

P.S. We’ve completed over a year of writing these blogs. If you have any suggestions on how to make them better or what you’d like us to cover, or any other opinions/reviews you might have, et al, please let us know by dropping an email to us. We’d be happy to hear your thoughts. :)

SSO Authentication for jitsi.debian.social, by Stefano Rivera

Debian.social’s jitsi instance has been getting some abuse by (non-Debian) people sharing sexually explicit content on the service. After playing whack-a-mole with this for a month, and shutting the instance off for another month, we opened it up again and the abuse immediately re-started.

Stefano sat down and wrote an SSO Implementation that hooks into Jitsi’s existing JWT SSO support. This requires everyone using jitsi.debian.social to have a Salsa account.

With only a little bit of effort, we could change this in future, to only require an account to open a room, and allow guests to join the call.

/usr-move, by Helmut Grohne

The biggest task this month was sending mitigation patches for all of the /usr-move issues arising from package renames due to the 2038 transition. As a result, we can now say that every affected package in unstable can either be converted with dh-sequence-movetousr or has an open bug report. The package set relevant to debootstrap except for the set that has to be uploaded concurrently has been moved to /usr and is awaiting migration. The move of coreutils happened to affect piuparts which hard codes the location of /bin/sync and received multiple updates as a result.

Miscellaneous contributions
  • Stefano Rivera uploaded a stable release update to python3.11 for bookworm, fixing a use-after-free crash.
  • Stefano uploaded a new version of python-html2text, and updated python3-defaults to build with it.
  • In support of Python 3.12, Stefano dropped distutils as a Build-Dependency from a few packages, and uploaded a complex set of patches to python-mitogen.
  • Stefano landed some merge requests to clean up dead code in dh-python, removed the flit plugin, and uploaded it.
  • Stefano uploaded new upstream versions of twisted, hatchling, python-flexmock, python-authlib, python–mitogen, python-pipx, and xonsh.
  • Stefano requested removal of a few packages supporting the Opsis HDMI2USB hardware that DebConf Video team used to use for HDMI capture, as they are not being maintained upstream. They started to FTBFS, with recent sdcc changes.
  • DebConf 24 is getting ready to open registration, Stefano spent some time fixing bugs in the website, caused by infrastructure updates.
  • Stefano reviewed all the DebConf 23 travel reimbursements, filing requests for more information from SPI where our records mismatched.
  • Stefano spun up a Wafer website for the Berlin 2024 mini DebConf.
  • Roberto C. Sánchez worked on facilitating the transfer of upstream maintenance responsibility for the dormant Shorewall project to a new team led by the current maintainer of the Shorewall packages in Debian.
  • Colin Watson fixed build failures in celery-haystack-ng, db1-compat, jsonpickle, libsdl-perl, kali, knews, openssh-ssh1, python-json-log-formatter, python-typing-extensions, trn4, vigor, and wcwidth. Some of these were related to the 64-bit time_t transition, since that involved enabling -Werror=implicit-function-declaration.
  • Colin fixed an off-by-one error in neovim, which was already causing a build failure in Ubuntu and would eventually have caused a build failure in Debian with stricter toolchain settings.
  • Colin added an sshd@.service template to openssh to help newer systemd versions make containers and VMs SSH-accessible over AF_VSOCK sockets.
  • Following the xz-utils backdoor, Colin spent some time testing and discussing OpenSSH upstream’s proposed inline systemd notification patch, since the current implementation via libsystemd was part of the attack vector used by that backdoor.
  • Utkarsh reviewed and sponsored some Go packages for Lena Voytek and Rajudev.
  • Utkarsh also helped Mitchell Dzurick with the adoption of pyparted package.
  • Helmut sent 10 patches for cross build failures.
  • Helmut partially fixed architecture cross bootstrap tooling to deal with changes in linux-libc-dev and the recent gcc-for-host changes and also fixed a 64bit-time_t FTBFS in libtextwrap.
  • Thorsten Alteholz uploaded several packages from debian-printing: cjet, lprng, rlpr and epson-inkjet-printer-escpr were affected by the newly enabled compiler switch -Werror=implicit-function-declaration. Besides fixing these serious bugs, Thorsten also worked on other bugs and could fix one or the other.
  • Carles updated simplemonitor and python-ring-doorbell packages with new upstream versions.
  • Santiago is still working on the Salsa CI MRs to adapt the build jobs so they can rely on sbuild. Current work includes adapting the images used by the build job, implementing the basic sbuild support the related jobs, and adjusting the support for experimental and *-backports releases..
    Additionally, Santiago reviewed some MR such as Make timeout action explicit in the logs and the subsequent Implement conditional timeout verbosity, and the batch of MRs included in https://salsa.debian.org/salsa-ci-team/pipeline/-/merge_requests/482.
  • Santiago also reviewed applications for the improving Salsa CI in Debian GSoC 2024 project. We received applications from four very talented candidates. The selection process is currently ongoing. A huge thanks to all of them!
  • As part of the DebConf 24 organization, Santiago has taken part in the Content team discussions.
Categories: FLOSS Project Planets

Reproducible Builds (diffoscope): diffoscope 264 released

Thu, 2024-04-11 20:00

The diffoscope maintainers are pleased to announce the release of diffoscope version 264. This version includes the following changes:

[ Chris Lamb ] * Don't crash on invalid zipfiles, even if we encounter 'badness' through through the file. (Re: #1068705) [ FC (Fay) Stegerman ] * Add note when there are duplicate entries in ZIP files. (Closes: reproducible-builds/diffoscope!140) [ Vagrant Cascadian ] * Add an external tool reference for GNU Guix for zipdetails.

You find out more by visiting the project homepage.

Categories: FLOSS Project Planets

Jonathan McDowell: Sorting out backup internet #1: recursive DNS

Thu, 2024-04-11 13:41

I work from home these days, and my nearest office is over 100 miles away, 3 hours door to door if I travel by train (and, to be honest, probably not a lot faster given rush hour traffic if I drive). So I’m reliant on a functional internet connection in order to be able to work. I’m lucky to have access to Openreach FTTP, provided by Aquiss, but I worry about what happens if there’s a cable cut somewhere or some other long lasting problem. Worst case I could tether to my work phone, or try to find some local coworking space to use while things get sorted, but I felt like arranging a backup option was a wise move.

Step 1 turned out to be sorting out recursive DNS. It’s been many moons since I had to deal with running DNS in a production setting, and I’ve mostly done my best to avoid doing it at home too. dnsmasq has done a decent job at providing for my needs over the years, covering DHCP, DNS (+ tftp for my test device network). However I just let it slave off my ISP’s nameservers, which means if that link goes down it’ll no longer be able to resolve anything outside the house.

One option would have been to either point to a different recursive DNS server (Cloudfare’s 1.1.1.1 or Google’s Public DNS being the common choices), but I’ve no desire to share my lookup information with them. As another approach I could have done some sort of failover of resolv.conf when the primary network went down, but then I would have to get into moving files around based on networking status and that felt a bit clunky.

So I decided to finally setup a proper local recursive DNS server, which is something I’ve kinda meant to do for a while but never had sufficient reason to look into. Last time I did this I did it with BIND 9 but there are more options these days, and I decided to go with unbound, which is primarily focused on recursive DNS.

One extra wrinkle, pointed out by Lars, is that having dynamic name information from DHCP hosts is exceptionally convenient. I’ve kept dnsmasq as the local DHCP server, so I wanted to be able to forward local queries there.

I’m doing all of this on my RB5009, running Debian. Installing unbound was a simple matter of apt install unbound. I needed 2 pieces of configuration over the default, one to enable recursive serving for the house networks, and one to enable forwarding of queries for the local domain to dnsmasq. I originally had specified the wildcard address for listening, but this caused problems with the fact my router has many interfaces and would sometimes respond from a different address than the request had come in on.

/etc/unbound/unbound.conf.d/network-resolver.conf server: interface: 192.0.2.1 interface: 2001::db8:f00d::1 access-control: 192.0.2.0/24 allow access-control: 2001::db8:f00d::/56 allow


/etc/unbound/unbound.conf.d/local-to-dnsmasq.conf server: domain-insecure: "example.org" do-not-query-localhost: no forward-zone: name: "example.org" forward-addr: 127.0.0.1@5353


I then had to configure dnsmasq to not listen on port 53 (so unbound could), respond to requests on the loopback interface (I have dnsmasq restricted to only explicitly listed interfaces), and to hand out unbound as the appropriate nameserver in DHCP requests - once dnsmasq is not listening on port 53 it no longer does this by default.

/etc/dnsmasq.d/behind-unbound interface=lo port=5353 dhcp-option=option6:dns-server,[2001::db8:f00d::1] dhcp-option=option:dns-server,192.0.2.1


With these minor changes in place I now have local recursive DNS being handled by unbound, without losing dynamic local DNS for DHCP hosts. As an added bonus I now get 10/10 on Test IPv6 - previously I was getting dinged on the ability for my DNS server to resolve purely IPv6 reachable addresses.

Next step, actually sorting out a backup link.

Categories: FLOSS Project Planets

Reproducible Builds: Reproducible Builds in March 2024

Thu, 2024-04-11 12:49

Welcome to the March 2024 report from the Reproducible Builds project! In our reports, we attempt to outline what we have been up to over the past month, as well as mentioning some of the important things happening more generally in software supply-chain security. As ever, if you are interested in contributing to the project, please visit our Contribute page on our website.

Arch Linux minimal container userland now 100% reproducible

In remarkable news, Reproducible builds developer kpcyrd reported that that the Arch Linux “minimal container userland” is now 100% reproducible after work by developers dvzv and Foxboron on the one remaining package. This represents a “real world”, widely-used Linux distribution being reproducible.

Their post, which kpcyrd suffixed with the question “now what?”, continues on to outline some potential next steps, including validating whether the container image itself could be reproduced bit-for-bit. The post, which was itself a followup for an Arch Linux update earlier in the month, generated a significant number of replies.


Validating Debian’s build infrastructure after the XZ backdoor

From our mailing list this month, Vagrant Cascadian wrote about being asked about trying to perform concrete reproducibility checks for recent Debian security updates, in an attempt to gain some confidence about Debian’s build infrastructure given that they performed builds in environments running the high-profile XZ vulnerability.

Vagrant reports (with some caveats):

So far, I have not found any reproducibility issues; everything I tested I was able to get to build bit-for-bit identical with what is in the Debian archive.

That is to say, reproducibility testing permitted Vagrant and Debian to claim with some confidence that builds performed when this vulnerable version of XZ was installed were not interfered with.


Making Fedora Linux (more) reproducible

In March, Davide Cavalca gave a talk at the 2024 Southern California Linux Expo (aka SCALE 21x) about the ongoing effort to make the Fedora Linux distribution reproducible.

Documented in more detail on Fedora’s website, the talk touched on topics such as the specifics of implementing reproducible builds in Fedora, the challenges encountered, the current status and what’s coming next. (YouTube video)


Increasing Trust in the Open Source Supply Chain with Reproducible Builds and Functional Package Management

Julien Malka published a brief but interesting paper in the HAL open archive on Increasing Trust in the Open Source Supply Chain with Reproducible Builds and Functional Package Management:

Functional package managers (FPMs) and reproducible builds (R-B) are technologies and methodologies that are conceptually very different from the traditional software deployment model, and that have promising properties for software supply chain security. This thesis aims to evaluate the impact of FPMs and R-B on the security of the software supply chain and propose improvements to the FPM model to further improve trust in the open source supply chain. PDF

Julien’s paper poses a number of research questions on how the model of distributions such as GNU Guix and NixOS can “be leveraged to further improve the safety of the software supply chain”, etc.


Software and source code identification with GNU Guix and reproducible builds

In a long line of commendably detailed blog posts, Ludovic Courtès, Maxim Cournoyer, Jan Nieuwenhuizen and Simon Tournier have together published two interesting posts on the GNU Guix blog this month. In early March, Ludovic Courtès, Maxim Cournoyer, Jan Nieuwenhuizen and Simon Tournier wrote about software and source code identification and how that might be performed using Guix, rhetorically posing the questions: “What does it take to ‘identify software’? How can we tell what software is running on a machine to determine, for example, what security vulnerabilities might affect it?”

Later in the month, Ludovic Courtès wrote a solo post describing adventures on the quest for long-term reproducible deployment. Ludovic’s post touches on GNU Guix’s aim to support “time travel”, the ability to reliably (and reproducibly) revert to an earlier point in time, employing the iconic image of Harold Lloyd hanging off the clock in Safety Last! (1925) to poetically illustrate both the slapstick nature of current modern technology and the gymnastics required to navigate hazards of our own making.


Two new Rust-based tools for post-processing determinism

Zbigniew Jędrzejewski-Szmek announced add-determinism, a work-in-progress reimplementation of the Reproducible Builds project’s own strip-nondeterminism tool in the Rust programming language, intended to be used as a post-processor in RPM-based distributions such as Fedora

In addition, Yossi Kreinin published a blog post titled “refix: fast, debuggable, reproducible builds that describes a tool that post-processes binaries in such a way that they are still debuggable with gdb, etc.. Yossi post details the motivation and techniques behind the (fast) performance of the tool.


Distribution work

In Debian this month, since the testing framework no longer varies the build path, James Addison performed a bulk downgrade of the bug severity for issues filed with a level of normal to a new level of wishlist. In addition, 28 reviews of Debian packages were added, 38 were updated and 23 were removed this month adding to ever-growing knowledge about identified issues. As part of this effort, a number of issue types were updated, including Chris Lamb adding a new ocaml_include_directories toolchain issue [] and James Addison adding a new filesystem_order_in_java_jar_manifest_mf_include_resource issue [] and updating the random_uuid_in_notebooks_generated_by_nbsphinx to reference a relevant discussion thread [].

In addition, Roland Clobus posted his 24th status update of reproducible Debian ISO images. Roland highlights that the images for Debian unstable often cannot be generated due to changes in that distribution related to the 64-bit time_t transition.

Lastly, Bernhard M. Wiedemann posted another monthly update for his reproducibility work in openSUSE.


Mailing list highlights

Elsewhere on our mailing list this month:


Website updates

There were made a number of improvements to our website this month, including:

  • Pol Dellaiera noticed the frequent need to correctly cite the website itself in academic work. To facilitate easier citation across multiple formats, Pol contributed a Citation File Format (CIF) file. As a result, an export in BibTeX format is now available in the Academic Publications section. Pol encourages community contributions to further refine the CITATION.cff file. Pol also added an substantial new section to the “buy in” page documenting the role of Software Bill of Materials (SBOMs) and ephemeral development environments. [][]

  • Bernhard M. Wiedemann added a new “commandments” page to the documentation [][] and fixed some incorrect YAML elsewhere on the site [].

  • Chris Lamb add three recent academic papers to the publications page of the website. []

  • Mattia Rizzolo and Holger Levsen collaborated to add Infomaniak as a sponsor of amd64 virtual machines. [][][]

  • Roland Clobus updated the “stable outputs” page, dropping version numbers from Python documentation pages [] and noting that Python’s set data structure is also affected by the PYTHONHASHSEED functionality. []


Delta chat clients now reproducible

Delta Chat, an open source messaging application that can work over email, announced this month that the Rust-based core library underlying Delta chat application is now reproducible.


diffoscope

diffoscope is our in-depth and content-aware diff utility that can locate and diagnose reproducibility issues. This month, Chris Lamb made a number of changes such as uploading versions 259, 260 and 261 to Debian and made the following additional changes:

  • New features:

    • Add support for the zipdetails tool from the Perl distribution. Thanks to Fay Stegerman and Larry Doolittle et al. for the pointer and thread about this tool. []
  • Bug fixes:

    • Don’t identify Redis database dumps as GNU R database files based simply on their filename. []
    • Add a missing call to File.recognizes so we actually perform the filename check for GNU R data files. []
    • Don’t crash if we encounter an .rdb file without an equivalent .rdx file. (#1066991)
    • Correctly check for 7z being available—and not lz4—when testing 7z. []
    • Prevent a traceback when comparing a contentful .pyc file with an empty one. []
  • Testsuite improvements:

    • Fix .epub tests after supporting the new zipdetails tool. []
    • Don’t use parenthesis within test “skipping…” messages, as PyTest adds its own parenthesis. []
    • Factor out Python version checking in test_zip.py. []
    • Skip some Zip-related tests under Python 3.10.14, as a potential regression may have been backported to the 3.10.x series. []
    • Actually test 7z support in the test_7z set of tests, not the lz4 functionality. (Closes: reproducible-builds/diffoscope#359). []

In addition, Fay Stegerman updated diffoscope’s monkey patch for supporting the unusual Mozilla ZIP file format after Python’s zipfile module changed to detect potentially insecure overlapping entries within .zip files. (#362)

Chris Lamb also updated the trydiffoscope command line client, dropping a build-dependency on the deprecated python3-distutils package to fix Debian bug #1065988 [], taking a moment to also refresh the packaging to the latest Debian standards []. Finally, Vagrant Cascadian submitted an update for diffoscope version 260 in GNU Guix. []


Upstream patches

This month, we wrote a large number of patches, including:

Bernhard M. Wiedemann used reproducibility-tooling to detect and fix packages that added changes in their %check section, thus failing when built with the --no-checks option. Only half of all openSUSE packages were tested so far, but a large number of bugs were filed, including ones against caddy, exiv2, gnome-disk-utility, grisbi, gsl, itinerary, kosmindoormap, libQuotient, med-tools, plasma6-disks, pspp, python-pypuppetdb, python-urlextract, rsync, vagrant-libvirt and xsimd.

Similarly, Jean-Pierre De Jesus DIAZ employed reproducible builds techniques in order to test a proposed refactor of the ath9k-htc-firmware package. As the change produced bit-for-bit identical binaries to the previously shipped pre-built binaries:

I don’t have the hardware to test this firmware, but the build produces the same hashes for the firmware so it’s safe to say that the firmware should keep working.


Reproducibility testing framework

The Reproducible Builds project operates a comprehensive testing framework running primarily at tests.reproducible-builds.org in order to check packages and other artifacts for reproducibility.

In March, an enormous number of changes were made by Holger Levsen:

  • Debian-related changes:

    • Sleep less after a so-called “404” package state has occurred. []
    • Schedule package builds more often. [][]
    • Regenerate all our HTML indexes every hour, but only every 12h for the released suites. []
    • Create and update unstable and experimental base systems on armhf again. [][]
    • Don’t reschedule so many “depwait” packages due to the current size of the i386 architecture queue. []
    • Redefine our scheduling thresholds and amounts. []
    • Schedule untested packages with a higher priority, otherwise slow architectures cannot keep up with the experimental distribution growing. []
    • Only create the stats_buildinfo.png graph once per day. [][]
    • Reproducible Debian dashboard: refactoring, update several more static stats only every 12h. []
    • Document how to use systemctl with new systemd-based services. []
    • Temporarily disable armhf and i386 continuous integration tests in order to get some stability back. []
    • Use the deb.debian.org CDN everywhere. []
    • Remove the rsyslog logging facility on bookworm systems. []
    • Add zst to the list of packages which are false-positive diskspace issues. []
    • Detect failures to bootstrap Debian base systems. []
  • Arch Linux-related changes:

    • Temporarily disable builds because the pacman package manager is broken. [][]
    • Split reproducible_html_live_status and split the scheduling timing . [][][]
    • Improve handling when database is locked. [][]
  • Misc changes:

    • Show failed services that require manual cleanup. [][]
    • Integrate two new Infomaniak nodes. [][][][]
    • Improve IRC notifications for artifacts. []
    • Run diffoscope in different systemd slices. []
    • Run the node health check more often, as it can now repair some issues. [][]
    • Also include the string Bot in the userAgent for Git. (Re: #929013). []
    • Document increased tmpfs size on our OUSL nodes. []
    • Disable memory account for the reproducible_build service. [][]
    • Allow 10 times as many open files for the Jenkins service. []
    • Set OOMPolicy=continue and OOMScoreAdjust=-1000 for both the Jenkins and the reproducible_build service. []

Mattia Rizzolo also made the following changes:

  • Debian-related changes:

    • Define a systemd slice to group all relevant services. [][]
    • Add a bunch of quotes in scripts to assuage the shellcheck tool. []
    • Add stats on how many packages have been built today so far. []
    • Instruct systemd-run to handle diffoscope’s exit codes specially. []
    • Prefer the pgrep tool over grepping the output of ps. []
    • Re-enable a couple of i386 and armhf architecture builders. [][]
    • Fix some stylistic issues flagged by the Python flake8 tool. []
    • Cease scheduling Debian unstable and experimental on the armhf architecture due to the time_t transition. []
    • Start a few more i386 & armhf workers. [][][]
    • Temporarly skip pbuilder updates in the unstable distribution, but only on the armhf architecture. []
  • Other changes:

    • Perform some large-scale refactoring on how the systemd service operates. [][]
    • Move the list of workers into a separate file so it’s accessible to a number of scripts. []
    • Refactor the powercycle_x86_nodes.py script to use the new IONOS API and its new Python bindings. []
    • Also fix nph-logwatch after the worker changes. []
    • Do not install the stunnel tool anymore, it shouldn’t be needed by anything anymore. []
    • Move temporary directories related to Arch Linux into a single directory for clarity. []
    • Update the arm64 architecture host keys. []
    • Use a common Postfix configuration. []

The following changes were also made: by

  • Jan-Benedict Glaw:

    • Initial work to clean up a messy NetBSD-related script. [][]
  • Roland Clobus:

    • Show the installer log if the installer fails to build. []
    • Avoid the minus character (i.e. -) in a variable in order to allow for tags in openQA. []
    • Update the schedule of Debian live image builds. []
  • Vagrant Cascadian:

    • Maintenance on the virt* nodes is completed so bring them back online. []
    • Use the fully qualified domain name in configuration. []

Node maintenance was also performed by Holger Levsen, Mattia Rizzolo [][] and Vagrant Cascadian [][][][]


If you are interested in contributing to the Reproducible Builds project, please visit our Contribute page on our website. However, you can get in touch with us via:

Categories: FLOSS Project Planets

Russell Coker: ML Training License

Thu, 2024-04-11 07:30

Last year a Debian Developer blogged about writing Haskell code to give a bad result for LLMs that were trained on it. I forgot who wrote the post and I’d appreciate the URL if anyone has it.

I respect such technical work to enforce one’s legal rights when they aren’t respected by corporations, but I have a different approach.

As an aside the Fosdem lecture “Fortify AI against regulation, litigation and lobotomies” is interesting on this topic [1], it’s what inspired me to write about this.

For what I write I am at this time happy to allow it to be used as part of a large training data set (consider this blog post a licence grant that applies until such time as I edit this post to change it). But only if aggregated with so much other data that my content is only a tiny portion of the data set by any metric. So I don’t want someone to make a programming LLM that has my code as the only C code or a political data set that has my blog posts as the only left-wing content. If someone wants to train an LLM on only my content to make a Russell-simulator then I don’t license my work for that purpose but also as it’s small enough that anyone with a bit of skill could do it on a weekend I can’t stop it. I would be really interested in seeing the results if someone from the FOSS community wanted to make a Russell-simulator and would probably issue them a license for such work if asked.

If my work comprises more than 0.1% of the content in a particular measure (theme, programming language, political position, etc) in a training data set then I don’t permit that without prior discussion.

Finally if someone wants to make a FOSS training data set to be used for FOSS LLM systems (maybe under the AGPL or some similar license) then I’ll allow my writing to be used as part of that.

Related posts:

  1. lemonup and blog license I have just updated my previous post about licenses and...
  2. License Fees for Music in Clubs The Cyber Law Center has blogged about the Phonographic Performance...
  3. BTRFS Training Some years ago Barwon South Water gave LUV 3 old...
Categories: FLOSS Project Planets

Wouter Verhelst: OpenSC and the Belgian eID

Thu, 2024-04-11 05:33

Getting the Belgian eID to work on Linux systems should be fairly easy, although some people do struggle with it.

For that reason, there is a lot of third-party documentation out there in the form of blog posts, wiki pages, and other kinds of things. Unfortunately, some of this documentation is simply wrong. Written by people who played around with things until it kind of worked, sometimes you get a situation where something that used to work in the past (but wasn't really necessary) now stopped working, but it's still added to a number of locations as though it were the gospel.

And then people follow these instructions and now things don't work anymore.

One of these revolves around OpenSC.

OpenSC is an open source smartcard library that has support for a pretty large number of smartcards, amongst which the Belgian eID. It provides a PKCS#11 module as well as a number of supporting tools.

For those not in the know, PKCS#11 is a standardized C API for offloading cryptographic operations. It is an API that can be used when talking to a hardware cryptographic module, in order to make that module perform some actions, and it is especially popular in the open source world, with support in NSS, amongst others. This library is written and maintained by mozilla, and is a low-level cryptographic library that is used by Firefox (on all platforms it supports) as well as by Google Chrome and other browsers based on that (but only on Linux, and as I understand it, only for linking with smartcards; their BoringSSL library is used for other things).

The official eID software that we ship through eid.belgium.be, also known as "BeID", provides a PKCS#11 module for the Belgian eID, as well as a number of support tools to make interacting with the card easier, such as the "eID viewer", which provides the ability to read data from the card, and validate their signatures. While the very first public version of this eID PKCS#11 module was originally based on OpenSC, it has since been reimplemented as a PKCS#11 module in its own right, with no lineage to OpenSC whatsoever anymore.

About five years ago, the Belgian eID card was renewed. At the time, a new physical appearance was the most obvious difference with the old card, but there were also some technical, on-chip, differences that are not so apparent. The most important one here, although it is not the only one, is the fact that newer eID cards now use a NIST P-384 elliptic curve-based private keys, rather than the RSA-based ones that were used in the past. This change required some changes to any PKCS#11 module that supports the eID; both the BeID one, as well as the OpenSC card-belpic driver that is written in support of the Belgian eID.

Obviously, the required changes were implemented for the BeID module; however, the OpenSC card-belpic driver was not updated. While I did do some preliminary work on the required changes, I was unable to get it to work, and eventually other things took up my time so I never finished the implementation. If someone would like to finish the work that I started, the preliminal patch that I wrote could be a good start -- but like I said, it doesn't yet work. Also, you'll probably be interested in the official documentation of the eID card.

Unfortunately, in the mean time someone added the Applet 1.8 ATR to the card-belpic.c file, without also implementing the required changes to the driver so that the PKCS#11 driver actually supports the eID card. The result of this is that if you have OpenSC installed in NSS for either Firefox or any Chromium-based browser, and it gets picked up before the BeID PKCS#11 module, then NSS will stop looking and pass all crypto operations to the OpenSC PKCS#11 module rather than to the official eID PKCS#11 module, and things will not work at all, causing a lot of confusion.

I have therefore taken the following two steps:

  1. The official eID packages now conflict with the OpenSC PKCS#11 module. Specifically only the PKCS#11 module, not the rest of OpenSC, so you can theoretically still use its tools. This means that once we release this new version of the eID software, when you do an upgrade and you have OpenSC installed, it will remove the PKCS#11 module and anything that depends on it. This is normal and expected.
  2. I have filed a pull request against OpenSC that removes the Applet 1.8 ATR from the driver, so that OpenSC will stop claiming that it supports the 1.8 applet.

When the pull request is accepted, we will update the official eID software to make the conflict versioned, so that as soon as it works again you will again be able to install the OpenSC and BeID packages at the same time.

In the mean time, if you have the OpenSC PKCS#11 module installed on your system, and your eID authentication does not work, try removing it.

Categories: FLOSS Project Planets

Ian Jackson: Why we’ve voted No to CfD for Derril Water solar farm

Tue, 2024-04-09 17:38

ceb and I are members of the Derril Water Solar Park cooperative.

We were recently invited to vote on whether the coop should bid for a Contract for Difference, in a government green electricity auction.

We’ve voted No.

“Green electricity” from your mainstream supplier is a lie

For a while ceb and I have wanted to contribute directly to green energy provision. This isn’t really possible in the mainstream consumer electricy market.

Mainstream electricity suppliers’ “100% green energy” tariffs are pure greenwashing. In a capitalist boondoogle, they basically “divvy up” the electricity so that customers on the (typically more expensive) “green” tariff “get” the green electricity, and the other customers “get” whatever is left. (Of course the electricity is actually all mixed up by the National Grid.) There are fewer people signed up for these tariffs than there is green power generated, so this basically means signing up for a “green” tariff has no effect whatsoever, other than giving evil people more money.

Ripple

About a year ago we heard about Ripple. The structure is a little complicated, but the basic upshot is:

Ripple promote and manage renewable energy schemes. The schemes themselves are each an individual company; the company is largely owned by a co-operative. The co-op is owned by consumers of electricity in the UK., To stop the co-operative being an purely financial investment scheme, shares ownership is limited according to your electricity usage. The electricity is be sold on the open market, and the profits are used to offset members’ electricity bills. (One gotcha from all of this is that for this to work your electricity billing provider has to be signed up with Ripple, but ours, Octopus, is.)

It seemed to us that this was a way for us to directly cause (and pay for!) the actual generation of green electricity.

So, we bought shares in one these co-operatives: we are co-owners of the Derril Water Solar Farm. We signed up for the maximum: funding generating capacity corresponding to 120% of our current electricity usage. We paid a little over £5000 for our shares.

Contracts for Difference

The UK has a renewable energy subsidy scheme, which goes by the name of Contracts for Difference. The idea is that a renewable energy generation company bids in advance, saying that they’ll sell their electricity at Y price, for the duration of the contract (15 years in the current round). The lowest bids win. All the electricity from the participating infrastructure is sold on the open market, but if the market price is low the government makes up the difference, and if the price is high, the government takes the winnings.

This is supposedly good for giving a stable investment environment, since the price the developer is going to get now doesn’t depends on the electricity market over the next 15 years. The CfD system is supposed to encourage development, so you can only apply before you’ve commissioned your generation infrastructure.

Ripple and CfD

Ripple recently invited us to agree that the Derril Water co-operative should bid in the current round of CfDs.

If this goes ahead, and we are one of the auction’s winners, the result would be that, instead of selling our electricity at the market price, we’ll sell it at the fixed CfD price.

This would mean that our return on our investment (which show up as savings on our electricity bills) would be decoupled from market electricity prices, and be much more predictable.

They can’t tell us the price they’d want to bid at, and future electricity prices are rather hard to predict, but it’s clear from the accompanying projections that they think we’d be better off on average with a CfD.

The documentation is very full of financial projections and graphs; other factors aren’t really discussed in any detail.

The rules of the co-op didn’t require them to hold a vote, but very sensibly, for such a fundamental change in the model, they decided to treat it roughly the same way as for a rules change: they’re hoping to get 75% Yes votes.

Voting No

The reason we’re in this co-op at all is because we want to directly fund renewable electricity.

Participating in the CfD auction would involve us competing with capitalist energy companies for government subsidies. Subsidies which are supposed to encourage the provision of green electricity.

It seems to us that participating in this auction would remove most of the difference between what we hoped to do by investing in Derril Water, and just participating in the normal consumer electricity market.

In particular, if we do win in the auction, that’s probably directly removing the funding and investment support model for other, market-investor-funded, projects.

In other words, our buying into Derril Water ceases to be an additional green energy project, changing (in its minor way) the UK’s electricity mix. It becomes a financial transaction much more tenously connected (if connected at all) to helping mitigate the climate emergency.

So our conclusion was that we must vote against.



comments
Categories: FLOSS Project Planets

Gunnar Wolf: Think outside the box • Welcome Eclipse!

Tue, 2024-04-09 12:38

Now that we are back from our six month period in Argentina, we decided to adopt a kitten, to bring more diversity into our lives. Perhaps this little girl will teach us to think outside the box!

Yesterday we witnessed a solar eclipse — Mexico City was not in the totality range (we reached ~80%), but it was a great experience to go with the kids. A couple dozen thousand people gathered for a massive picnic in las islas, the main area inside our university campus.

Afterwards, we went briefly back home, then crossed the city to fetch the little kitten. Of course, the kids were unanimous: Her name is Eclipse.

Categories: FLOSS Project Planets

Matthew Palmer: How I Tripped Over the Debian Weak Keys Vulnerability

Mon, 2024-04-08 20:00

Those of you who haven’t been in IT for far, far too long might not know that next month will be the 16th(!) anniversary of the disclosure of what was, at the time, a fairly earth-shattering revelation: that for about 18 months, the Debian OpenSSL package was generating entirely predictable private keys.

The recent xz-stential threat (thanks to @nixCraft for making me aware of that one), has got me thinking about my own serendipitous interaction with a major vulnerability. Given that the statute of limitations has (probably) run out, I thought I’d share it as a tale of how “huh, that’s weird” can be a powerful threat-hunting tool – but only if you’ve got the time to keep pulling at the thread.

Prelude to an Adventure

Our story begins back in March 2008. I was working at Engine Yard (EY), a now largely-forgotten Rails-focused hosting company, which pioneered several advances in Rails application deployment. Probably EY’s greatest claim to lasting fame is that they helped launch a little code hosting platform you might have heard of, by providing them free infrastructure when they were little more than a glimmer in the Internet’s eye.

I am, of course, talking about everyone’s favourite Microsoft product: GitHub.

Since GitHub was in the right place, at the right time, with a compelling product offering, they quickly started to gain traction, and grow their userbase. With growth comes challenges, amongst them the one we’re focusing on today: SSH login times. Then, as now, GitHub provided SSH access to the git repos they hosted, by SSHing to git@github.com with publickey authentication. They were using the standard way that everyone manages SSH keys: the ~/.ssh/authorized_keys file, and that became a problem as the number of keys started to grow.

The way that SSH uses this file is that, when a user connects and asks for publickey authentication, SSH opens the ~/.ssh/authorized_keys file and scans all of the keys listed in it, looking for a key which matches the key that the user presented. This linear search is normally not a huge problem, because nobody in their right mind puts more than a few keys in their ~/.ssh/authorized_keys, right?

Of course, as a popular, rapidly-growing service, GitHub was gaining users at a fair clip, to the point that the one big file that stored all the SSH keys was starting to visibly impact SSH login times. This problem was also not going to get any better by itself. Something Had To Be Done.

EY management was keen on making sure GitHub ran well, and so despite it not really being a hosting problem, they were willing to help fix this problem. For some reason, the late, great, Ezra Zygmuntowitz pointed GitHub in my direction, and let me take the time to really get into the problem with the GitHub team. After examining a variety of different possible solutions, we came to the conclusion that the least-worst option was to patch OpenSSH to lookup keys in a MySQL database, indexed on the key fingerprint.

We didn’t take this decision on a whim – it wasn’t a case of “yeah, sure, let’s just hack around with OpenSSH, what could possibly go wrong?”. We knew it was potentially catastrophic if things went sideways, so you can imagine how much worse the other options available were. Ensuring that this wouldn’t compromise security was a lot of the effort that went into the change. In the end, though, we rolled it out in early April, and lo! SSH logins were fast, and we were pretty sure we wouldn’t have to worry about this problem for a long time to come.

Normally, you’d think “patching OpenSSH to make mass SSH logins super fast” would be a good story on its own. But no, this is just the opening scene.

Chekov’s Gun Makes its Appearance

Fast forward a little under a month, to the first few days of May 2008. I get a message from one of the GitHub team, saying that somehow users were able to access other users’ repos over SSH. Naturally, as we’d recently rolled out the OpenSSH patch, which touched this very thing, the code I’d written was suspect number one, so I was called in to help.

They're called The Usual Suspects for a reason, but sometimes, it really is Keyser Söze

Eventually, after more than a little debugging, we discovered that, somehow, there were two users with keys that had the same key fingerprint. This absolutely shouldn’t happen – it’s a bit like winning the lottery twice in a row1 – unless the users had somehow shared their keys with each other, of course. Still, it was worth investigating, just in case it was a web application bug, so the GitHub team reached out to the users impacted, to try and figure out what was going on.

The users professed no knowledge of each other, neither admitted to publicising their key, and couldn’t offer any explanation as to how the other person could possibly have gotten their key.

Then things went from “weird” to “what the…?”. Because another pair of users showed up, sharing a key fingerprint – but it was a different shared key fingerprint. The odds now have gone from “winning the lottery multiple times in a row” to as close to “this literally cannot happen” as makes no difference.

Once we were really, really confident that the OpenSSH patch wasn’t the cause of the problem, my involvement in the problem basically ended. I wasn’t a GitHub employee, and EY had plenty of other customers who needed my help, so I wasn’t able to stay deeply involved in the on-going investigation of The Mystery of the Duplicate Keys.

However, the GitHub team did keep talking to the users involved, and managed to determine the only apparent common factor was that all the users claimed to be using Debian or Ubuntu systems, which was where their SSH keys would have been generated.

That was as far as the investigation had really goten, when along came May 13, 2008.

Chekov’s Gun Goes Off

With the publication of DSA-1571-1, everything suddenly became clear. Through a well-meaning but ultimately disasterous cleanup of OpenSSL’s randomness generation code, the Debian maintainer had inadvertently reduced the number of possible keys that could be generated by a given user from “bazillions” to a little over 32,000. With so many people signing up to GitHub – some of them no doubt following best practice and freshly generating a separate key – it’s unsurprising that some collisions occurred.

You can imagine the sense of “oooooooh, so that’s what’s going on!” that rippled out once the issue was understood. I was mostly glad that we had conclusive evidence that my OpenSSH patch wasn’t at fault, little knowing how much more contact I was to have with Debian weak keys in the future, running a huge store of known-compromised keys and using them to find misbehaving Certificate Authorities, amongst other things.

Lessons Learned

While I’ve not found a description of exactly when and how Luciano Bello discovered the vulnerability that became CVE-2008-0166, I presume he first came across it some time before it was disclosed – likely before GitHub tripped over it. The stable Debian release that included the vulnerable code had been released a year earlier, so there was plenty of time for Luciano to have discovered key collisions and go “hmm, I wonder what’s going on here?”, then keep digging until the solution presented itself.

The thought “hmm, that’s odd”, followed by intense investigation, leading to the discovery of a major flaw is also what ultimately brought down the recent XZ backdoor. The critical part of that sequence is the ability to do that intense investigation, though.

When I reflect on my brush with the Debian weak keys vulnerability, what sticks out to me is the fact that I didn’t do the deep investigation. I wonder if Luciano hadn’t found it, how long it might have been before it was found. The GitHub team would have continued investigating, presumably, and perhaps they (or I) would have eventually dug deep enough to find it. But we were all super busy – myself, working support tickets at EY, and GitHub feverishly building features and fighting the fires in their rapidly-growing service.

As it was, Luciano was able to take the time to dig in and find out what was happening, but just like the XZ backdoor, I feel like we, as an industry, got a bit lucky that someone with the skills, time, and energy was on hand at the right time to make a huge difference.

It’s a luxury to be able to take the time to really dig into a problem, and it’s a luxury that most of us rarely have. Perhaps an understated takeaway is that somehow we all need to wrestle back some time to follow our hunches and really dig into the things that make us go “hmm…”.

Support My Hunches

If you’d like to help me be able to do intense investigations of mysterious software phenomena, you can shout me a refreshing beverage on ko-fi.

  1. the odds are actually probably more like winning the lottery about twenty times in a row. The numbers involved are staggeringly huge, so it’s easiest to just approximate it as “really, really unlikely”. 

Categories: FLOSS Project Planets

Bastian Blank: Python dataclasses for Deb822 format

Mon, 2024-04-08 13:00

Python includes some helping support for classes that are designed to just hold some data and not much more: Data Classes. It uses plain Python type definitions to specify what you can have and some further information for every field. This will then generate you some useful methods, like __init__ and __repr__, but on request also more. But given that those type definitions are available to other code, a lot more can be done.

There exists several separate packages to work on data classes. For example you can have data validation from JSON with dacite.

But Debian likes a pretty strange format usually called Deb822, which is in fact derived from the RFC 822 format of e-mail messages. Those files includes single messages with a well known format.

So I'd like to introduce some Deb822 format support for Python Data Classes. For now the code resides in the Debian Cloud tool.

Usage Setup

It uses the standard data classes support and several helper functions. Also you need to enable support for postponed evaluation of annotations.

from __future__ import annotations from dataclasses import dataclass from dataclasses_deb822 import read_deb822, field_deb822 Class definition start

Data classes are just normal classes, just with a decorator.

@dataclass class Package: Field definitions

You need to specify the exact key to be used for this field.

package: str = field_deb822('Package') version: str = field_deb822('Version') arch: str = field_deb822('Architecture')

Default values are also supported.

multi_arch: Optional[str] = field_deb822( 'Multi-Arch', default=None, ) Reading files for p in read_deb822(Package, sys.stdin, ignore_unknown=True): print(p) Full example from __future__ import annotations from dataclasses import dataclass from debian_cloud_images.utils.dataclasses_deb822 import read_deb822, field_deb822 from typing import Optional import sys @dataclass class Package: package: str = field_deb822('Package') version: str = field_deb822('Version') arch: str = field_deb822('Architecture') multi_arch: Optional[str] = field_deb822( 'Multi-Arch', default=None, ) for p in read_deb822(Package, sys.stdin, ignore_unknown=True): print(p) Known limitations
Categories: FLOSS Project Planets

Thorsten Alteholz: My Debian Activities in March 2024

Sun, 2024-04-07 07:56
FTP master

This month I accepted 147 and rejected 12 packages. The overall number of packages that got accepted was 151.

If you file an RM bug, please do check whether there are reverse dependencies as well and file RM bugs for them. It is annoying and time-consuming when I have to do the moreinfo dance.

Debian LTS

This was my hundred-seventeenth month that I did some work for the Debian LTS initiative, started by Raphael Hertzog at Freexian.

During my allocated time I uploaded:

  • [DLA 3770-1] libnet-cidr-lite-perl security update for one CVE to fix IP parsing and ACLs based on the result
  • [#1067544] Bullseye PU bug for libmicrohttpd
  • Unfortunately XZ happened at the end of month and I had to delay/intentionally delayed other uploads: they will appear as DLA-3781-1 and DLA-3784-1 in April

I also continued to work on qtbase-opensource-src and last but not least did a week of FD.

Debian ELTS

This month was the sixty-eighth ELTS month. During my allocated time I uploaded:

  • [ELA-1062-1]libnet-cidr-lite-perl security update for one CVE to improve parsing of IP addresses in Jessie and Stretch
  • Due to XZ I also delayed the uploads here. They will appear as ELA-1069-1 and DLA-1070-1 in April

I also continued on an update for qtbase-opensource-src in Stretch (and LTS and other releases as well) and did a week of FD.

Debian Printing

This month I uploaded new upstream or bugfix versions of:

This work is generously funded by Freexian!

Debian Astro

This month I uploaded a new upstream or bugfix version of:

Debian IoT

This month I uploaded new upstream or bugfix versions of:

Debian Mobcom

This month I uploaded a new upstream or bugfix version of:

misc

This month I uploaded new upstream or bugfix versions of:

Categories: FLOSS Project Planets

John Goerzen: Facebook is Censoring Stories about Climate Change and Illegal Raid in Marion, Kansas

Sat, 2024-04-06 10:00

It is, sadly, not entirely surprising that Facebook is censoring articles critical of Meta.

The Kansas Reflector published an artical about Meta censoring environmental articles about climate change — deeming them “too controversial”.

Facebook then censored the article about Facebook censorship, and then after an independent site published a copy of the climate change article, Facebook censored it too.

The CNN story says Facebook apologized and said it was a mistake and was fixing it.

Color me skeptical, because today I saw this:

Yes, that’s right: today, April 6, I get a notification that they removed a post from August 12. The notification was dated April 4, but only showed up for me today.

I wonder why my post from August 12 was fine for nearly 8 months, and then all of a sudden, when the same website runs an article critical of Facebook, my 8-month-old post is a problem. Hmm.

Riiiiiight. Cybersecurity.

This isn’t even the first time they’ve done this to me.

On September 11, 2021, they removed my post about the social network Mastodon (click that link for screenshot). A post that, incidentally, had been made 10 months prior to being removed.

While they ultimately reversed themselves, I subsequently wrote Facebook’s Blocking Decisions Are Deliberate — Including Their Censorship of Mastodon.

That this same pattern has played out a second time — again with something that is a very slight challenege to Facebook — seems to validate my conclusion. Facebook lets all sort of hateful garbage infest their site, but anything about climate change — or their own censorship — gets removed, and this pattern persists for years.

There’s a reason I prefer Mastodon these days. You can find me there as @jgoerzen@floss.social.

So. I’ve written this blog post. And then I’m going to post it to Facebook. Let’s see if they try to censor me for a third time. Bring it, Facebook.

Categories: FLOSS Project Planets

Junichi Uekawa: Trying to explain analogue clock.

Fri, 2024-04-05 23:37
Trying to explain analogue clock. It's hard to explain. Tried adding some things for affordance, and it is still not enough. So it's not obvious which arm is the hour and which arm is the minute. analog clock

Categories: FLOSS Project Planets

Paul Wise: FLOSS Activities March 2024

Fri, 2024-04-05 19:24
Focus

This month I didn't have any particular focus. I just worked on issues in my info bubble.

Changes Issues Administration
  • Debian wiki: approve accounts
Communication
  • Respond to queries from Debian users and contributors on the mailing lists and IRC
Sponsors

The SWH work was sponsored. All other work was done on a volunteer basis.

Categories: FLOSS Project Planets

Dirk Eddelbuettel: RcppArmadillo 0.12.8.2.0 on CRAN: Upstream Fix

Fri, 2024-04-05 18:12

Armadillo is a powerful and expressive C++ template library for linear algebra and scientific computing. It aims towards a good balance between speed and ease of use, has a syntax deliberately close to Matlab, and is useful for algorithm development directly in C++, or quick conversion of research code into production environments. RcppArmadillo integrates this library with the R environment and language–and is widely used by (currently) 1136 other packages on CRAN, downloaded 33.5 million times (per the partial logs from the cloud mirrors of CRAN), and the CSDA paper (preprint / vignette) by Conrad and myself has been cited 578 times according to Google Scholar.

This release brings a new upstream bugfix release Armadillo 12.8.2 prepared by Conrad two days ago. It took the usual day to noodle over 1100+ reverse dependencies and ensure two failures were independent of the upgrade (i.e., “no change to worse” in CRAN parlance). It took CRAN another because we hit a random network outage for (spurious) NOTE on a remote URL, and were then caught in the shrapnel from another large package ecosystem update spuriously pointing some build failures that were due to a missing rebuild to us. All good, as human intervention comes to the rescue.

The set of changes since the last CRAN release follows.

Changes in RcppArmadillo version 0.12.8.2.0 (2024-04-02)
  • Upgraded to Armadillo release 12.8.2 (Cortisol Injector)

    • Workaround for FFTW3 header clash

    • Workaround in testing framework for issue under macOS

    • Minor cleanups to reduce code bloat

    • Improved documentation

Courtesy of my CRANberries, there is a diffstat report relative to previous release. More detailed information is on the RcppArmadillo page. Questions, comments etc should go to the rcpp-devel mailing list off the Rcpp R-Forge page.

If you like this or other open-source work I do, you can sponsor me at GitHub.

This post by Dirk Eddelbuettel originated on his Thinking inside the box blog. Please report excessive re-aggregation in third-party for-profit settings.

Categories: FLOSS Project Planets

Bits from Debian: apt install dpl-candidate: Sruthi Chandran

Fri, 2024-04-05 14:36

The Debian Project Developers will shortly vote for a new Debian Project Leader known as the DPL.

The DPL is the official representative of representative of The Debian Project tasked with managing the overall project, its vision, direction, and finances.

The DPL is also responsible for the selection of Delegates, defining areas of responsibility within the project, the coordination of Developers, and making decisions required for the project.

Our outgoing and present DPL Jonathan Carter served 4 terms, from 2020 through 2024. Jonathan shared his last Bits from the DPL post to Debian recently and his hopes for the future of Debian.

Recently, we sat with the two present candidates for the DPL position asking questions to find out who they really are in a series of interviews about their platforms, visions for Debian, lives, and even their favorite text editors. The interviews were conducted by disaster2life (Yashraj Moghe) and made available from video and audio transcriptions:

  • Andreas Tille [Interview]
  • Sruthi Chandran [this document]

Voting for the position starts on April 6, 2024.

Editors' note: This is our official return to Debian interviews, readers should stay tuned for more upcoming interviews with Developers and other important figures in Debian as part of our "Meet your Debian Developer" series. We used the following tools and services: Turboscribe.ai for the transcription from the audio and video files, IRC: Oftc.net for communication, Jitsi meet for interviews, and Open Broadcaster Software (OBS) for editing and video. While we encountered many technical difficulties in the return to this process, we are still able and proud to present the transcripts of the interviews edited only in a few areas for readability.

2024 Debian Project Leader Candidate: Sruthi Chandran

Sruthi's interview

Hi Sruthi, so for the first question, who are you and could you tell us a little bit about yourself?

[Sruthi]:

I usually talk about me whenever I am talking about answering the question who am I, I usually say like I am a librarian turned free software enthusiast and a bin developer. So I had no technical background and I learned, I was introduced to free software through my husband and then I learned Debian packaging, and eventually I became a Debian developer. So I always give my example to people who say I am not technically inclined, I don't have technical background so I can't contribute to free software.

So yeah, that's what I refer to myself.

For the next question, could you tell me what do you do in Debian, and could you mention your story up until here today?

[Sruthi]:

Okay, so let me start from my initial days in Debian. I started contributing to Debian, my first contribution was a Tibetan font. We went to a Tibetan place and they were saying they didn't have a font in Linux.

So that's how I started contributing. Then I moved on to Ruby packages, then I have some JavaScript and Go packages, all dependencies of GitLab. So I was involved with maintaining GitLab for some time, now I'm not very active there.

But yeah, so GitLab was the main package I was contributing to since I contributed since 2016 to maybe like 2020 or something. Later I have come [over to] packaging. Now I am part of some of the teams, delegated teams, like community team and outreach team, as well as the Debconf committee. And the biggest, I think, my activity in Debian, I would say is organizing Debconf 2023. So it was a great experience and yeah, so that's my story in Debian.

So what are three key terms about you and your candidacy?

[Sruthi]:

Okay, let me first think about it. For candidacy, I can start with diversity is one point I started expressing from the first time I contested for DPL. But to be honest, that's the main point I want to bring.

[Yashraj]:

So for diversity, if you could break down your thoughts on diversity and make them, [about] your three points including diversity.

[Sruthi]:

So in addition to, eventually when starting it was just diversity. Now I have like a bit more ideas, like community, like I want to be a leader for the Debian community. More than, I don't know, maybe people may not agree, but I would say I want to be a leader of Debian community rather than a Debian operating system.

I connect to community more and third point I would say.

The term of a DPL lasts for an year. So what do you think during, what would you try to do during that, that you can't do from your position now?

[Sruthi]:

Okay. So I, like, I am very happy with the structure of Debian and how things work in Debian. Like you can do almost a lot of things, like almost all things without being a DPL.

Whatever change you want to bring about or whatever you want to do, you can do without being a DPL. Anyone, like every DD has the same rights. Only things I feel [the] DPL has hold on are mainly the budget or the funding part, which like, that's where they do the decision making part.

And then comes like, and one advantage of DPL driving some idea is that somehow people tend to listen to that with more, like, tend to give more attention to what DPL is saying rather than a normal DD. So I wanted to, like, I have answered some of the questions on how to, how I plan to do the financial budgeting part, how I want to handle, like, and the other thing is using the extra attention that I get as a DPL, I would like to obviously start with the diversity aspect in Debian. And yeah, like, I, what I want to do is not, like, be a leader and say, like, take Debian to one direction where I want to go, but I would rather take suggestions and inputs from the whole community and go about with that.

So yes, that's what I would say.

And taking a less serious question now, what is your preferred text editor?

[Sruthi]:

Vim.

[Yashraj]:

Vim, wholeheartedly team Vim?

[Sruthi]:

Yes.

[Yashraj]:

Great. Well, this was made in Vim, all the text for this.

[Sruthi]:

So, like, since you mentioned extra data, I'll give my example, like, it's just a fun note, when I started contributing to Debian, as I mentioned, I didn't have any knowledge about free software, like Debian, and I was not used to even using Linux. So, and I didn't have experience with these text editors. So, when I started contributing, I used to do the editing part using gedit.

So, that's how I started. Eventually, I moved to Nano, and once I reached Vim, I didn't move on.

Team Vim. Next question. What, what do you think is the importance of the Debian project in the world today? And where would you like to see it in 10 years, like 10 years into the future?

[Sruthi]:

Okay. So, Debian, as we all know, is referred to as the universal operating system without, like, it is said for a reason. We have hundreds and hundreds of operating systems, like Linux, distributions based on Debian.

So, I believe Debian, like even now, Debian has good influence on the, at least on the Linux or Linux ecosystem. So, what we implement in Debian has, like, is going to affect quite a lot of, like, a very good percentage of people using Linux. So, yes.

So, I think Debian is one of the leading Linux distributions. And I think in 10 years, we should be able to reach a position, like, where we are not, like, even now, like, even these many years after having Linux, we face a lot of problems in newer and newer hardware coming up and installing on them is a big problem. Like, firmwares and all those things are getting more and more complicated.

Like, it should be getting simpler, but it's getting more and more complicated. So, I, one thing I would imagine, like, I don't know if we will ever reach there, but I would imagine that eventually with the Debian, we should be able to have some, at least a few of the hardware developers or hardware producers have Debian pre-installed and those kind of things. Like, not, like, become, I'm not saying it's all, it's also available right now.

What I'm saying is that it becomes prominent enough to be opted as, like, default distro.

What part of Debian has made you And what part of the project has kept you going all through these years?

[Sruthi]:

Okay. So, I started to contribute in 2016, and I was part of the team doing GitLab packaging, and we did have a lot of training workshops and those kind of things within India. And I was, like, I had interacted with some of the Indian DDs, but I never got, like, even through chat or mail.

I didn't have a lot of interaction with the rest of the world, DDs. And the 2019 Debconf changed my whole perspective about Debian. Before that, I wasn't, like, even, I was interested in free software.

I was doing the technical stuff and all. But after DebConf, my whole idea has been, like, my focus changed to the community. Debian community is a very welcoming, very interesting community to be with.

And so, I believe that, like, 2019 DebConf was a for me. And that kept, from 2019, my focus has been to how to support, like, how, I moved to the community part of Debian from there. Then in 2020 I became part of the community team, and, like, I started being part of other teams.

So, these, I would say, the Debian community is the one, like, aspect of Debian that keeps me whole, keeps me held on to the Debian ecosystem as a whole.

Continuing to speak about Debian, what do you think, what is the first thing that comes to your mind when you think of Debian, like, the word, the community, what's the first thing?

[Sruthi]:

I think I may sound like a broken record or something.

[Yashraj]:

No, no.

[Sruthi]:

Again, I would say the Debian community, like, it's the people who makes Debian, that makes Debian special.

Like, apart from that, if I say, I would say I'm very, like, one part of Debian that makes me very happy is the, how the governing system of Debian works, the Debian constitution and all those things, like, it's a very unique thing for Debian. And, and it's like, when people say you can't work without a proper, like, establishment or even somebody deciding everything for you, it's difficult. When people say, like, we have been, Debian has been proving it for quite a long time now, that it's possible.

So, so that's one thing I believe, like, that's one unique point. And I am very proud about that.

What areas do you think Debian is failing in, how can it (that standing) be improved?

[Sruthi]:

So, I think where Debian is failing now is getting new people into Debian. Like, I don't remember, like, exactly the answer. But I remember hearing someone mention, like, the average age of a Debian developer is, like, above 40 or 45 or something, like, exact age, I don't remember.

But it's like, Debian is getting old. Like, the people in Debian are getting old and we are not getting enough of new people into Debian. And that's very important to have people, like, new people coming up.

Otherwise, eventually, like, after a few years, nobody, like, we won't have enough people to take the project forward. So, yeah, I believe that is where we need to work on. We are doing some efforts, like, being part of GSOC or outreachy and having maybe other events, like, local events. Like, we used to have a lot of Debian packaging workshops in India. And those kind of, I think, in Brazil and all, they all have, like, local communities are doing. But we are not very successful in retaining the people who maybe come and try out things.

But we are not very good at retaining the people, like, retaining people who come. So, we need to work on those things. Right now, I don't have a solid answer for that.

But one thing, like, I was thinking about is, like, having a Debian specific outreach project, wherein the focus will be about the Debian, like, starting will be more on, like, usually what happens in GSOC and outreach is that people come, have the, do the contributions, and they go back. Like, they don't have that connection with the Debian, like, Debian community or Debian project. So, what I envision with these, the Debian outreach, the Debian specific outreach is that we have some part of the internship, like, even before starting the internship, we have some sessions and, like, with the people in Debian having, like, getting them introduced to the Debian philosophy and Debian community and Debian, how Debian works.

And those things, we focus on that. And then we move on to the technical internship parts. So, I believe this could do some good in having, like, when you have people you can connect to, you tend to stay back in a project mode.

When you feel something more than, like, right now, we have so many technical stuff to do, like, the choice for a college student is endless. So, if they want, if they stay back for something, like, maybe for Debian, I would say, we need to have them connected to the Debian project before we go into technical parts. Like, technical parts, like, there are other things as well, where they can go and do the technical part, but, like, they can come here, like, yeah.

So, that's what I was saying. Focused outreach projects is one thing. That's just one.

That's not enough. We need more of, like, more ideas to have more new people come up. And I'm very happy with, like, the DebConf thing. We tend to get more and more people from the places where we have a DebConf. Brazil is an example. After the Debconf, they have quite a good improvement on Debian contributors.

And I think in India also, it did give a good result. Like, we have more people contributing and staying back and those things. So, yeah.

So, these were the things I would say, like, we can do to improve.

For the final question, what field in free software do you, what field in free software generally do you think requires the most work to be put into it? What do you think is Debian's part in that field?

[Sruthi]:

Okay. Like, right now, what comes to my mind is the free software licenses parts. Like, we have a lot of free software licenses, and there are non-free software licenses.

But currently, I feel free software is having a big problem in enforcing these licenses. Like, there are, there may be big corporations or like some people who take up the whole, the code and may not follow the whole, for example, the GPL licenses. Like, we don't know how much of those, how much of the free softwares are used in the bigger things.

Yeah, I agree. There are a lot of corporations who are afraid to touch free software. But there would be good amount of free software, free work that converts into property, things violating the free software licenses and those things.

And we do not have the kind of like, we have SFLC, SFC, etc. But still, we do not have the ability to go behind and trace and implement the licenses. So, enforce those licenses and bring people who are violating the licenses forward and those kind of things is challenging because one thing is it takes time, like, and most importantly, money is required for the legal stuff.

And not always people who like people who make small software, or maybe big, but they may not have the kind of time and money to have these things enforced. So, that's a big challenge free software is facing, especially in our current scenario. I feel we are having those, like, we need to find ways how we can get it sorted.

I don't have an answer right now what to do. But this is a challenge I felt like and Debian's part in that. Yeah, as I said, I don't have a solution for that.

But the Debian, so DFSG and Debian sticking on to the free software licenses is a good support, I think.

So, that was the final question, Do you have anything else you want to mention for anyone watching this?

[Sruthi]:

Not really, like, I am happy, like, I think I was able to answer the questions. And yeah, I would say who is watching. I won't say like, I'm the best DPL candidate, you can't have a better one or something.

I stand for a reason. And if you believe in that, or the Debian community and Debian diversity, and those kinds of things, if you believe it, I hope you would be interested, like, you would want to vote for me. That's it.

Like, I'm not, I'll make it very clear. I'm not doing a technical leadership part here. So, those, I can't convince people who want technical leadership to vote for me.

But I would say people who connect with me, I hope they vote for me.

Categories: FLOSS Project Planets

Bits from Debian: apt install dpl-candidate: Andreas Tille

Fri, 2024-04-05 14:36

The Debian Project Developers will shortly vote for a new Debian Project Leader known as the DPL.

The Project Leader is the official representative of The Debian Project tasked with managing the overall project, its vision, direction, and finances.

The DPL is also responsible for the selection of Delegates, defining areas of responsibility within the project, the coordination of Developers, and making decisions required for the project.

Our outgoing and present DPL Jonathan Carter served 4 terms, from 2020 through 2024. Jonathan shared his last Bits from the DPL post to Debian recently and his hopes for the future of Debian.

Recently, we sat with the two present candidates for the DPL position asking questions to find out who they really are in a series of interviews about their platforms, visions for Debian, lives, and even their favorite text editors. The interviews were conducted by disaster2life (Yashraj Moghe) and made available from video and audio transcriptions:

  • Andreas Tille [this document]
  • Sruthi Chandran [Interview]

Voting for the position starts on April 6, 2024.

Editors' note: This is our official return to Debian interviews, readers should stay tuned for more upcoming interviews with Developers and other important figures in Debian as part of our "Meet your Debian Developer" series. We used the following tools and services: Turboscribe.ai for the transcription from the audio and video files, IRC: Oftc.net for communication, Jitsi meet for interviews, and Open Broadcaster Software (OBS) for editing and video. While we encountered many technical difficulties in the return to this process, we are still able and proud to present the transcripts of the interviews edited only in a few areas for readability.

2024 Debian Project Leader Candidate: Andrea Tille

Andreas' Interview

Who are you? Tell us a little about yourself.

[Andreas]:

How am I? Well, I'm, as I wrote in my platform, I'm a proud grandfather doing a lot of free software stuff, doing a lot of sports, have some goals in mind which I like to do and hopefully for the best of Debian.

And How are you today?

[Andreas]:

How I'm doing today? Well, actually I have some headaches but it's fine for the interview.

So, usually I feel very good. Spring was coming here and today it's raining and I plan to do a bicycle tour tomorrow and hope that I do not get really sick but yeah, for the interview it's fine.

What do you do in Debian? Could you mention your story here?

[Andreas]:

Yeah, well, I started with Debian kind of an accident because I wanted to have some package salvaged which is called WordNet. It's a monolingual dictionary and I did not really plan to do more than maybe 10 packages or so. I had some kind of training with xTeddy which is totally unimportant, a cute teddy you can put on your desktop.

So, and then well, more or less I thought how can I make Debian attractive for my employer which is a medical institute and so on. It could make sense to package bioinformatics and medicine software and it somehow evolved in a direction I did neither expect it nor wanted to do, that I'm currently the most busy uploader in Debian, created several teams around it.

DebianMate is very well known from me. I created the Blends team to create teams and techniques around what we are doing which was Debian TIS, Debian Edu, Debian Science and so on and I also created the packaging team for R, for the statistics package R which is technically based and not topic based. All these blends are covering a certain topic and R is just needed by lots of these blends.

So, yeah, and to cope with all this I have written a script which is routing an update to manage all these uploads more or less automatically. So, I think I had one day where I uploaded 21 new packages but it's just automatically generated, right? So, it's on one day more than I ever planned to do.

What is the first thing you think of when you think of Debian?

Editors' note: The question was misunderstood as the “worst thing you think of when you think of Debian”

[Andreas]:

The worst thing I think about Debian, it's complicated. I think today on Debian board I was asked about the technical progress I want to make and in my opinion we need to standardize things inside Debian. For instance, bringing all the packages to salsa, follow some common standards, some common workflow which is extremely helpful.

As I said, if I'm that productive with my own packages we can adopt this in general, at least in most cases I think. I made a lot of good experience by the support of well-formed teams. Well-formed teams are those teams where people support each other, help each other.

For instance, how to say, I'm a physicist by profession so I'm not an IT expert. I can tell apart what works and what not but I'm not an expert in those packages. I do and the amount of packages is so high that I do not even understand all the techniques they are covering like Go, Rust and something like this.

And I also don't speak Java and I had a problem once in the middle of the night and I've sent the email to the list and was a Java problem and I woke up in the morning and it was solved. This is what I call a team. I don't call a team some common repository that is used by random people for different packages also but it's working together, don't hesitate to solve other people's problems and permit people to get active.

This is what I call a team and this is also something I observed in, it's hard to give a percentage, in a lot of other teams but we have other people who do not even understand the concept of the team. Why is working together make some advantage and this is also a tough thing. I [would] like to tackle in my term if I get elected to form solid teams using the common workflow. This is one thing.

The other thing is that we have a lot of good people in our infrastructure like FTP masters, DSA and so on. I have the feeling they have a lot of work and are working more or less on their limits, and I like to talk to them [to ask] what kind of change we could do to move that limits or move their personal health to the better side.

The DPL term lasts for a year, What would you do during that you couldn't do now?

[Andreas]:

Yeah, well this is basically what I said are my main issues. I need to admit I have no really clear imagination what kind of tasks will come to me as a DPL because all these financial issues and law issues possible and issues [that] people who are not really friendly to Debian might create. I'm afraid these things might occupy a lot of time and I can't say much about this because I simply don't know.

What are three key terms about you and your candidacy?

[Andreas]:

As I said, I like to work on standards, I’d like to make Debian try [to get it right so] that people don't get overworked, this third key point is be inviting to newcomers, to everybody who wants to come. Yeah, I also mentioned in my term this diversity issue, geographical and from gender point of view. This may be the three points I consider most important.

Preferred text editor?

[Andreas]:

Yeah, my preferred one? Ah, well, I have no preferred text editor. I'm using the Midnight Commander very frequently which has an internal editor which is convenient for small text. For other things, I usually use VI but I also use Emacs from time to time. So, no, I have not preferred text editor. Whatever works nicely for me.

What is the importance of the community in the Debian Project? How would like to see it evolving over the next few years?

[Andreas]:

Yeah, I think the community is extremely important. So, I was on a lot of DebConfs. I think it's not really 20 but 17 or 18 DebCons and I really enjoyed these events every year because I met so many friends and met so many interesting people that it's really enriching my life and those who I never met in person but have read interesting things and yeah, Debian community makes really a part of my life.

And how do you think it should evolve specifically?

[Andreas]:

Yeah, for instance, last year in Kochi, it became even clearer to me that the geographical diversity is a really strong point. Just discussing with some women from India who is afraid about not coming next year to Busan because there's a problem with Shanghai and so on. I'm not really sure how we can solve this but I think this is a problem at least I wish to tackle and yeah, this is an interesting point, the geographical diversity and I'm running the so-called mentoring of the month.

This is a small project to attract newcomers for the Debian Med team which has the focus on medical packages and I learned that we had always men applying for this and so I said, okay, I dropped the constraint of medical packages.

Any topic is fine, I teach you packaging but it must be someone who does not consider himself a man. I got only two applicants, no, actually, I got one applicant and one response which was kind of strange if I'm hunting for women or so.

I did not understand but I got one response and interestingly, it was for me one of the least expected counters. It was from Iran and I met a very nice woman, very open, very skilled and gifted and did a good job or have even lose contact today and maybe we need more actively approach groups that are underrepresented. I don't know if what's a good means which I did but at least I tried and so I try to think about these kind of things.

What part of Debian has made you smile? What part of the project has kept you going all through the years?

[Andreas]:

Well, the card game which is called Mao on the DebConf made me smile all the time. I admit I joined only two or three times even if I really love this kind of games but I was occupied by other stuff so this made me really smile. I also think the first online DebConf in 2020 made me smile because we had this kind of short video sequences and I tried to make a funny video sequence about every DebConf I attended before. This is really funny moments but yeah, it's not only smile but yeah.

One thing maybe it's totally unconnected to Debian but I learned personally something in Debian that we have a do-ocracy and you can do things which you think that are right if not going in between someone else, right? So respect everybody else but otherwise you can do so.

And in 2020 I also started to take trees which are growing widely in my garden and plant them into the woods because in our woods a lot of trees are dying and so I just do something because I can. I have the resource to do something, take the small tree and bring it into the woods because it does not harm anybody. I asked the forester if it is okay, yes, yes, okay. So everybody can do so but I think the idea to do something like this came also because of the free software idea. You have the resources, you have the computer, you can do something and you do something productive, right? And when thinking about this I think it was also my Debian work.

Meanwhile I have planted more than 3,000 trees so it's not a small number but yeah, I enjoy this.

What part of Debian would you have some criticisms for?

[Andreas]:

Yeah, it's basically the same as I said before. We need more standards to work together. I do not want to repeat this but this is what I think, yeah.

What field in Free Software generally do you think requires the most work to be put into it? What do you think is Debian's part in the field?

[Andreas]:

It's also in general, the thing is the fact that I'm maintaining packages which are usually as modern software is maintained in Git, which is fine but we have some software which is at Sourceport, we have software laying around somewhere, we have software where Debian somehow became Upstream because nobody is caring anymore and free software is very different in several things, ways and well, I in principle like freedom of choice which is the basic of all our work.

Sometimes this freedom goes in the way of productivity because everybody is free to re-implement. You asked me for the most favorite editor. In principle one really good working editor would be great to have and would work and we have maybe 500 in Debian or so, I don't know.

I could imagine if people would concentrate and say five instead of 500 editors, we could get more productive, right? But I know this will not happen, right? But I think this is one thing which goes in the way of making things smooth and productive and we could have more manpower to replace one person who's [having] children, doing some other stuff and can't continue working on something and maybe this is a problem I will not solve, definitely not, but which I see.

What do you think is Debian's part in the field?

[Andreas]:

Yeah, well, okay, we can bring together different Upstreams, so we are building some packages and have some general overview about similar things and can say, oh, you are doing this and some other person is doing more or less the same, do you want to join each other or so, but this is kind of a channel we have to our Upstreams which is probably not very successful.

It starts with code copies of some libraries which are changed a little bit, which is fine license-wise, but not so helpful for different things and so I've tried to convince those Upstreams to forward their patches to the original one, but for this and I think we could do some kind of, yeah, [find] someone who brings Upstream together or to make them stop their forking stuff, but it costs a lot of energy and we probably don't have this and it's also not realistic that we can really help with this problem.

Do you have any questions for me?

[Andreas]:

I enjoyed the interview, I enjoyed seeing you again after half a year or so. Yeah, actually I've seen you in the eating room or cheese and wine party or so, I do not remember we had to really talk together, but yeah, people around, yeah, for sure. Yeah.

Categories: FLOSS Project Planets

Emanuele Rocca: PGP keys on Yubikey, with a side of Mutt

Fri, 2024-04-05 09:22

Here are my notes about copying PGP keys to external hardware devices such as Yubikeys. Let me begin by saying that the gpg tools are pretty bad at this.

MAKE A COUPLE OF BACKUPS OF ~/.gnupg/ TO DIFFERENT ENCRYPTED USB STICKS BEFORE YOU START. GPG WILL MESS UP YOUR KEYS. SERIOUSLY.

For example, would you believe me if I said that saving changes results in the removal of your private key? Well check this out.

Now that you have multiple safe, offline backups of your keys, here are my notes.

apt install yubikey-manager scdaemon

Plug the Yubikey in, see if it’s recognized properly:

ykman list gpg --card-status

Change the default PIN (123456) and Admin PIN (12345678):

gpg --card-edit gpg/card> admin gpg/card> passwd

Look at the openpgp information and change the maximum number of retries, if you like. I have seen this failing a couple of times, unplugging the Yubikey and putting it back in worked.

ykman openpgp info ykman openpgp access set-retries 7 7 7

Copy your keys. MAKE A BACKUP OF ~/.gnupg/ BEFORE YOU DO THIS.

gpg --edit-key $KEY_ID gpg> keytocard # follow the prompts to copy the first key

Now choose the next key and copy that one too. Repeat till all subkeys are copied.

gpg> key 1 gpg> keytocard

Typing gpg --card-status you should be able to see all your keys on the Yubikey now.

Using the key on another machine

How do you use your PGP keys on the Yubikey on other systems?

Go to another system, if it does have a ~/.gnupg directory already move it somewhere else.

apt install scdaemon

Import your public key:

gpg -k gpg --keyserver pgp.mit.edu --recv-keys $KEY_ID

Check the fingerprint and if it is indeed your key say you trust it:

gpg --edit-key $KEY_ID > trust > 5 > y > save

Now try gpg --card-status and gpg --list-secret-keys, you should be able to see your keys. Try signing something, it should work.

gpg --output /tmp/x.out --sign /etc/motd gpg --verify /tmp/x.out Using the Yubikey with Mutt

If you’re using mutt with IMAP, there is a very simple trick to safely store your password on disk. Create an encrypted file with your IMAP password:

echo SUPERSECRET | gpg --encrypt > ~/.mutt_password.gpg

Add the following to ~/.muttrc:

set imap_pass=`gpg --decrypt ~/.mutt_password.gpg`

With the above, mutt now prompts you to insert the Yubikey and type your PIN in order to connect to the IMAP server.

Categories: FLOSS Project Planets

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