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Zlatan Todorić: Its all about fun

Planet Debian - Sat, 2015-03-28 21:00

The percentage that women in Debian occupy as DDs is ~2%. Yes, just ~2% ladies that are DDs! So that means ~98% of DDs are gentelmen.

I know there are more of ladies in Debian, so I firstly urge you, for love of Debian, to apply if you are contributing to this project, love its community and want to see Debian taking over the universe (okay, it seems that we conquered outer space so we need a help on Earth).

So why is the number this low? Well maybe it's too precious to us currently inside that we want to prevent it being spoiled from outside. Also there seems to be not that much of younger DDs. Why is that important - well, young people like to do it and not to think about it. Many time they just break it, but many time they also do a breakthrough. Why is difference important and why should we embrace it? It's very important because it breaks a monopoly on view and behavior. It brings views not just from a larger number of people, but also from people from different backgrounds, and in constructive conversation it can put even more pluses on current workflow or it can counter it with good arguments. In a project of its size and worldwide geolocation of its developers, this is true for Debian more then any other projects I know. We need more women so we can balance our inner workings and have a better understanding of humanity and how is it moving, what and why does it need and where is it steering. That way we can produce a community which will improve quality of OS that we produce - because of sheer number of different people working on the same thing bringing to it its own personal touch. So, ladies and youth all over the world, unite and join in Debian because without diversity Debian can't grow beyond its current size. Also, no, Debian is not about code only, it needs painters, musicians, people that want to talk about Debian, people that share love and happiness, people that want to build better communities, UI/UX designers, makers, people who know how to repair a bike, athletes, homebrew beer producers, lawyers (just while world gets rid of laws, then we don't need you), actors, writters... Why, well because world and communities are made up from all that diversity and that's what makes it a better and not a monotone place.

But I just use Debian. Well, do you feel love towards Debian and its work? Would you like to feel more as integral part of community? If the answer is big fat YES, then you should be a DD too. Every person that feels it's part of Debians philosophy about freedom and behaving in good manner should join Debian. Every person that feels touched and enhanced by Debian's work should become part of community and share its experience how Debian touched their soul, impacted their life. If you love Debian, you should be free to contribute to it in whatever manner and you should be free to express your love towards it. If you think lintian is sexy, or shebang is a good friends of yours, or you enjoy talking to MadameZou about Debian and zombies (yeah, we do have all kinds of here), or you like Krita, or you hate the look of default XFCE theme, or you can prove that you a more crazy developer then paultag - just hop into community and try to integrate in it. You will meet great folks, have a lot of conversation about wine and cheese, play some dangerous card games and even learn about things like bokononism (yeah I am looking at you dkg!).

Now for the current Debian community - what the hell is packaging and non-packaging Debian Developer? Are one better then others? Do others stink? They don't know to hug? WHAT? Yes I know that inexperienced person shouldn't have a permission to access Debian packaging infrastructure, but I have the feeling that even that person knows that. Every person should have a place in Debian and acknowledge other fields. So yes, software developers need access to Debian packaging infrastructure, painters don't. I think we can agree on this. So lets abolish the stupid term and remove the difference in our community. Lets embrace the difference, because if someone writes a good poem about Debian heroism I could like it more then flashplugin-nonfree! Yep, I made that comparison on purpose so you can give a thought about it.

Debian has excellent community regarding operating system that it's producing. And it's not going away, not at least anytime soon. But it will not go forward if we don't give additional push as human beings, as people who care about their fellow Debianites. And we do care, I know that, we just need to push it more public. We don't hide bugs, we for sure shouldn't hide features. It will probably bring bad seeds too, but we have mechanisms and will to counter that. If we, on average 10 bad seeds, get some crazy good hacker or crazy lovely positive person like this lady, we will be on right path. Debian is a better place, it should lead in effort to bring more people into FLOSS world and it should allow people to bring more of diversity into Debian.

Categories: FLOSS Project Planets

GNUtls: GnuTLS 3.3.14

GNU Planet! - Sat, 2015-03-28 20:00

Released GnuTLS 3.3.14, a bug-fix release on the stable branch.

Categories: FLOSS Project Planets

Eddy Petrișor: Net Neutrality

Planet Debian - Sat, 2015-03-28 19:40
I have seen this awesomeness way too late, but is still awesome.
Categories: FLOSS Project Planets

Leo 'costela' Antunes: Go linear programming library

Planet Debian - Sat, 2015-03-28 16:55

After a way too long hiatus, I finally got back to working on some side-projects and wrote a small go library for solving linear programming problems. Say hi to golp!

Since I’m no LP expert, golp makes use of GLPK to do the actual weight-lifting. Unfortunately, GLPK currently isn’t reentrant, so it can’t really be used with go’s great goroutines. Still, works well enough to be used for a next little project.

Now, if only I could get back to working on Debian…

Categories: FLOSS Project Planets

Blue Drop Shop: Camp Record Beta Test Three: MidCamp 2015

Planet Drupal - Sat, 2015-03-28 16:08

After my #epicfail that was BADCamp, to say that I was entering MidCamp with trepidation would be the understatement of the year. Two full days of sessions and a 1-and-1 track record was weighing heavily upon my soul. Add to the mix that I was coming directly off of a 5-day con my company runs, and responsible for MidCamp venue and catering logistics. Oh right, and I ran out of time to make instructions and train anyone else on setup, which only added to my on-site burden.

Testing is good.

After BADCamp, I added a powered 4-port USB hub to the kits, as well as an accessory pack for the H2N voice recorder, mainly for the powered A/C adapter and remote. All total, these two items bring the current cost of the kit to about $425.

In addition, at one of our venue walk-throughs, I was able to actually test the kits with the projectors UIC would be using. The units in two of the rooms had an unexplainable random few-second blackout of the screens, but the records were good and the rest of the rooms checked out.

Success.

After the mad scramble setting up three breakout rooms and the main stage leading up to the opening keynote, I can't begin to describe the feeling in the pit of my stomach after I pulled the USB stick after stopping the keynote recording. I can’t begin to describe the elation I felt after seeing a full record, complete with audio.

We hit a few snags with presenters not starting their records (fixable) and older PCs not connecting (possibly fixable), and a couple sessions that didn’t have audio (hello redundancy from the voice recorder). Aside from that, froboy and I were able to trim and upload all the successful records during the Sunday sprint.

A huge shout out also goes to jason.bell for helping me on-site with setups and capture. He helped me during Fox Valley’s camp, so I deputized him as soon as I saw him Friday morning.

Learnings.

With the addition of the powered USB hub, we no longer need to steal any ports from the presenter laptop. For all of the first day, we were unnecessarily hooking up the hub’s USB cable to the presenter laptop. Doing this caused a restart of the record kit. We did lose a session to a presenter laptop going to sleep, and I have to wonder whether we would have still captured it if the hub hadn’t been attached.

The VGA to HDMI dongle is too unreliable to be part of the kit. When used, either there was no connection, or it would cycle between on and off. Most, if not all, machines that didn’t have mini display port or direct HMDI out had full display port. I will be testing a display port to HDMI dongle for a more reliable option.

Redundant audio is essential. The default record format for the voice recorders is a WAV file. These are best quality, but enormous, which is why I failed at capturing most of BADCamp’s audio (RTFM, right?). By changing the settings to 192kbs MP3, two days of session audio barely made a dent in the 2GB cards that are included with the recorders. Thankfully, this saved three session records: two with no audio at all (still a mystery) and one with blown out audio.

Trimming and combining in YouTube is a thing. Kudos again to froboy for pointing me to YouTube’s editing capabilities. A couple sessions had split records (also a mystery), which we then stitched together after upload, and several sessions needed some pre- or post-record trimming. This can all be done in YouTube instead of using a video editor and re-encoding. Granted, YouTube takes what seems like forever to process, but it works and once you do the editing, you can forget about it.

There is a known issue with mini display port to HDMI where a green tint is added to the output. Setting the external PVR to 720p generally fixed this. There were a couple times where it didn’t, but switching either between direct HDMI or mini display port to HDMI seemed to resolve most of the issues. Sorry for the few presenters that opted for funky colors before we learned this during the camp. The recording is always fine, but the on-site experience is borked.

Finally, we need to tell presenters to adjust their energy saver settings. I take this for granted, because the con my company runs is for marketing people who present frequently, and this is basically just assumed to be set correctly. We are a more casual bunch and don’t fret when the laptop sleeps or the screen saver comes up during a presentation. Just move the cursor and roll with it. But that can kill a record...even with the Drupal Association kits. I do plan to test this, now that I’ve learned we don’t need any power at all from the presenter laptop, but it’s still an easy fix with documentation.

Next steps.

Documentation. I need to make simple instructions sheets to include with the kits. Overall, they are really easy to use and connect, but it’s completely unfamiliar territory. With foolproof instructions, presenters can be at ease and room monitors can be tasked with assisting without fear.

Packaging. With the mad dash to set these up — combined with hourly hookups — these were a hot mess on the podium. I’ll be working to tighten these up so they look less intimidating and take up less space. No idea what this entails yet, so I’ll gladly accept ideas.

Testing. As mentioned, I will test regular display port to HDMI, as well as various sleep states while recording.

Shipping. Because these kits are so light weight, part of the plan is to be able to share them with regional camps. There was a lot of interest from other organizers in these kits during the camp. Someone from Twin Cities even offered to purchase a kit to add to the mix, as long as they could borrow the others. A Pelican box with adjustable inserts would be just the ticket.

Sponsors. If you are willing to help finance this project, please contact me at kthull@bluedropshop.com. While Fox Valley Camp owns three kits and MidCamp owns one, wouldn’t it be great to have your branding on these as they make their way around the camp circuit? The equipment costs have (mostly) been reimbursed, but I’ve devoted a lot of time to testing and documenting the process, and will be spending more time with the next steps listed above.

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Categories: FLOSS Project Planets

Amazee Labs: Drupal Camp Johannesburg 2015

Planet Drupal - Sat, 2015-03-28 15:52
Drupal Camp Johannesburg 2015

Today I had the pleasure to attend Johannesburg's Drupal Camp 2015.

The event was organized by DASA that is doing a stunning job in gathering and energizing South Africa's Drupal Community. From community subjects to Drupal 8, we got to see a lekker variety of talks including those by Michael and me on "Drupal 8" and "How to run a successful Drupal Shop".

Special thanks to the organizers Riaan, Renate, Adam, Greg and Robin. Up next will be Drupal Camp Cape Town in September 2015.

Categories: FLOSS Project Planets

DrupalOnWindows: Adding native JSON storage support in Drupal 7 or how to mix RDBM with NoSQL

Planet Drupal - Sat, 2015-03-28 13:45
Language English

I rencently read a very interesting article of an all time .Net developer comparing the MEAN stack (Mongo-Express-Angluar-Node) with traditional .Net application design. (I can't post the link because I'm unable to find the article!!).

Among other things he compared the tedious process of adding a new field in the RDBM model (modifying the database, then the data layer, then views and controllers), whereas in the MEAN stack it was as simple as adding two lines of code to the UI.

More articles...
Categories: FLOSS Project Planets

Matt Zimmerman: What I think about thought

Planet Debian - Sat, 2015-03-28 12:50

Only parts of us will ever
touch o̶n̶l̶y̶ parts of others –
one’s own truth is just that really — one’s own truth.
We can only share the part that is u̶n̶d̶e̶r̶s̶t̶o̶o̶d̶ ̶b̶y̶ within another’s knowing acceptable t̶o̶ ̶t̶h̶e̶ ̶o̶t̶h̶e̶r̶—̶t̶h̶e̶r̶e̶f̶o̶r̶e̶ so one
is for most part alone.
As it is meant to be in
evidently in nature — at best t̶h̶o̶u̶g̶h̶ ̶ perhaps it could make
our understanding seek
another’s loneliness out.

– unpublished poem by Marilyn Monroe, via berlin-artparasites

This poem inspired me to put some ideas into words this morning, an attempt to summarize my current working theory of consciousness.

Ideas travel through space and time. An idea that exists in my mind is filtered through my ability to express it somehow (words, art, body language, …), and is then interpreted by your mind and its models for understanding the world. This shifts your perspective in some way, some or all of which may be unconscious. When our minds encounter new ideas, they are accepted or rejected, reframed, and integrated with our existing mental models. This process forms a sort of living ecosystem, which maintains equilibrium within the realm of thought. Ideas are born, divide, mutate, and die in the process. Language, culture, education and so on are stable structures which form and support this ecosystem.

Consciousness also has analogues of the immune system, for example strongly held beliefs and models which tend to reject certain ideas. Here again these can be unconscious or conscious. I’ve seen it happen that if someone hears an idea they simply cannot integrate, they will behave as if they did not hear it at all. Some ideas can be identified as such a serious threat that ignoring them is not enough to feel safe: we feel compelled to eliminate the idea in the external world. The story of Christianity describes a scenario where an idea was so threatening to some people that they felt compelled to kill someone who expressed it.

A microcosm of this ecosystem also exists within each individual mind. There are mental structures which we can directly introspect and understand, and others which we can only infer by observing our thoughts and behaviors. These structures communicate with each other, and this communication is limited by their ability to “speak each other’s language”. A dream, for example, is the conveyance of an idea from an unconscious place to a conscious one. Sometimes we get the message, and sometimes we don’t. We can learn to interpret, but we can’t directly examine and confirm if we’re right. As in biology, each part of this process introduces uncountable “errors”, but the overall system is surprisingly robust and stable.

This whole system, with all its many minds interacting, can be thought of as an intelligence unto itself, a gestalt consciousness. This interpretation leads to some interesting further conclusions:

  • The notion that an individual person possesses a single, coherent point of view seems nonsensical
  • The separation between “my mind” and “your mind” seems arbitrary
  • The attribution of consciousness only to humans, or only to living beings, seems absurd

Naturally, this is by no means an original idea (can such a thing exist?). It is my own take on the subject, informed both consciously and unconsciously by my own study, first-hand experience, conversations I’ve had with others, and so on. It’s informed by the countless thinkers who have influenced me. Its expression is limited by my ability to write about it in a way that makes sense to other people.
Maybe some of this makes sense to you, and maybe I seem insane, or maybe both. Hopefully you don’t find that you have an inexplicable unconscious desire to kill me!


Categories: FLOSS Project Planets

Joachim Breitner: An academic birthday present

Planet Debian - Sat, 2015-03-28 08:30

Yesterday, which happened to be my 30th birthday, a small package got delivered to my office: The printed proceedings of last year's “Trends in Functional Programming” conference, where I published a paper on Call Arity (preprint). Although I doubt the usefulness of printed proceedings, it was a nicely timed birthday present.

Looking at the rather short table of contents – only 8 papers, after 27 presented and 22 submitted – I thought that this might mean that, with some luck, I might have chances to get the “Best student paper award”, which I presumed to be announced at the next iteration of the conference.

For no particular reason I was leisurely browsing through the book, and started to read the preface. And what do I read there?

Among the papers selected for these proceedings, two papers stood out. The award for Best Student Paper went to Joachim Breitner for his paper entitled Call Arity, and the award for Best Paper Overall went to Edwin Brady for his paper entitled Resource-dependent Algebraic Effects. Congratulations!

Now, that is a real nice birthday present! Not sure if I even would have found out about it, had I not have thrown a quick glance at page V...

I hope that it is a good omen for my related ICFP'15 submission.

Categories: FLOSS Project Planets

ABlog for Sphinx: ABlog v0.5.1 released

Planet Python - Fri, 2015-03-27 20:00

Added :excerpts: option to postlist directive.

Categories: FLOSS Project Planets

Gaël Varoquaux: Euroscipy 2015: Call for paper

Planet Python - Fri, 2015-03-27 19:00

EuroScipy 2015, the annual conference on Python in science will take place in Cambridge, UK on 26-30 August 2015. The conference features two days of tutorials followed by two days of scientific talks & posters and an extra day dedicated to developer sprints. It is the major event in Europe in the field of technical/scientific computing within the Python ecosystem. Scientists, PhD’s, students, data scientists, analysts, and quants from more than 20 countries attended the conference last year.

The topics presented at EuroSciPy are very diverse, with a focus on advanced software engineering and original uses of Python and its scientific libraries, either in theoretical or experimental research, from both academia and the industry.

Submissions for posters, talks & tutorials (beginner and advanced) are welcome on our website at http://www.euroscipy.org/2015/ Sprint proposals should be addressed directly to the organisation at euroscipy-org@python.org

Important dates:

  • Apr 30, 2015 Talk and tutorials submission deadline
  • May 1, 2015 Registration opens
  • May 30, 2015 Final program announced
  • Jun 15, 2015 Early-bird registration ends
  • Aug 26-27, 2015 Tutorials
  • Aug 28-29, 2015 Main conference
  • Aug 30, 2015 Sprints

We look forward to an exciting conference and hope to see you in Cambridge

The EuroSciPy 2015 Team - http://ww.euroscipy.org/2015/

Categories: FLOSS Project Planets

Update: OpenStack Summit Vancouver Presentation

Planet KDE - Fri, 2015-03-27 18:16
The schedule for the upcoming OpenStack Summit 2015 in Vancouver is finally available. Sage and I submitted a presentation about "Storage security in a critical enterprise OpenStack environment". The submission was accepted and the talk is scheduled for Monday, May 18th, 15:40 - 16:20. 
There are also some other talks related to Ceph available:Checkout the links or the schedule for dates and times of the talks. 
See you in Vancouver!
Categories: FLOSS Project Planets

PyCharm: Feature Spotlight: Python remote development with PyCharm

Planet Python - Fri, 2015-03-27 17:30

Happy Friday everyone,

In today’s blog post I’m going to cover some basic principles and features in PyCharm that make Python remote development easy as pie. To demonstrate them I’ll use a very simple flask web application from the official flask github repository. Enjoy the read!

Note: Remote development functionality is only available in PyCharm Professional Edition. For more details please see the editions comparison page

First I clone the official flask repository from https://github.com/mitsuhiko/flask. Then from the PyCharm’s Welcome screen I open the blueprintexample directory, which stores the source of the super simple flask application I’m going to use for the demo:

PyCharm opens the directory and creates a project based on it:

Now I’m going to set up the remote machine to start with the remote development. I use Vagrant which PyCharm offers great support for. In one of my previous blog posts I already covered Vagrant integration, so here are just the straight steps to provision and run a VM. I go to Tools | Vagrant | Init in Project Root and select the Ubuntu 14.04 image which was previously imported from the collection of vagrant boxes. This creates the Vagrantfile in the project root. Now, I’m going to edit this file to configure a private network and make my VM visible from my host machine:

Next, I run the VM with Tools | Vagrant | Up and PyCharm shows me that the VM is up and running:

We can open a local terminal inside PyCharm to test the VM:

Alright, the VM responses to ping. Now, I want to run my web application on the VM, so I need to copy my project sources to the remote host. This is easily done with the Deployment tool inside PyCharm.
I go to Tools | Deployment | Configuration and specify the connection details for my VM:

On the Mappings tab in the same window I specify the path mapping rule:

In my case I want my current local project directory blueprintexampe to be mapped to remote /home/vagrant/blueprintremote.
Now I can right-click my project in the project view and select Upload to:

And this will upload my project to the specified directory on the remote machine:

One of the handiest features is that you can set up automatic upload to the remote machine by simply clicking Tools | Deployment | Automatic Upload:

From this point on, all changes made locally will be uploaded to the remote machine automatically, so you don’t need to worry about having fresh sources on the remote host. Cool, isn’t it?

So now, I’m going to modify one of the files in my project, so the flask application will be visible remotely (adding host=’0.0.0.0’ as a parameter to the app.run() ), and PyCharm automatically uploads the changes to the remote machine:

Next, I specify the python interpreter to be used for my project. I go to File | Settings (Preferences for Mac OS) | Project | Project Interpreter. By default, PyCharm sets the local Python interpreter as a project interpreter, so I’ll change it to the remote one:

As I’ve already created a deployment configuration, PyCharm offers to export Python interpreter settings from the existing deployment configuration:

But I can also specify the remote interpreter manually, using SSH credentials or a Vagrant configuration. Here I’ll do it manually:

After I specify the new remote python interpreter, PyCharm starts indexing and finds that the flask package is not installed on the project interpreter:

I can fix this easily with Alt + Enter on the unresolved reference error highlighted with red:

Alright. Now everything is ok, so we can finally specify Run/Debug configuration and launch our application. Let’s go to Run | Edit Configurations and add a new Python run/debug configuration:

In the Run/Debug configuration dialog, I specify the name for my new configuration and the script to be executed on the remote host. PyCharm sets the project interpreter (remote in this case) by default for this new run configuration, and finally I need to specify path mappings for this particular run configuration:

It seems we’re all set. I click the Run button:

PyCharm shows that the application is up and running on port 5000 on the VM.
I open the browser to check that the application is really working:

From this point on, we can work with this project like with a normal local project. PyCharm takes care of uploading any changes to the remote machine and keeps the VM up and running.

With the same Run/Debug configuration, we can do a simple remote debug session putting a few breakpoints right in the editor:

Click the debug button or go to Run | Debug:

That’s it! Hopefully you’ll appreciate this remote development functionality in PyCharm that makes Python remote development a breeze.

If you’re still craving for more details on PyCharm remote development capabilities, as well as other remote development features, please see the online help.

Talk to you next week,
Dmitry

Categories: FLOSS Project Planets

Bryan Pendleton: Are automated tools for testing distributed systems becoming a reality?

Planet Apache - Fri, 2015-03-27 16:45

These recent publications would suggest that the time has finally come to deploy serious test tools for bullet-proofing large scale distributed systems.

Exciting!

Categories: FLOSS Project Planets

Richard Hartmann: Release Critical Bug report for Week 13

Planet Debian - Fri, 2015-03-27 16:42

The UDD bugs interface currently knows about the following release critical bugs:

  • In Total: 1039 (Including 155 bugs affecting key packages)
    • Affecting Jessie: 97 (key packages: 65) That's the number we need to get down to zero before the release. They can be split in two big categories:
      • Affecting Jessie and unstable: 77 (key packages: 51) Those need someone to find a fix, or to finish the work to upload a fix to unstable:
        • 13 bugs are tagged 'patch'. (key packages: 9) Please help by reviewing the patches, and (if you are a DD) by uploading them.
        • 4 bugs are marked as done, but still affect unstable. (key packages: 1) This can happen due to missing builds on some architectures, for example. Help investigate!
        • 60 bugs are neither tagged patch, nor marked done. (key packages: 41) Help make a first step towards resolution!
      • Affecting Jessie only: 20 (key packages: 14) Those are already fixed in unstable, but the fix still needs to migrate to Jessie. You can help by submitting unblock requests for fixed packages, by investigating why packages do not migrate, or by reviewing submitted unblock requests.
        • 11 bugs are in packages that are unblocked by the release team. (key packages: 7)
        • 9 bugs are in packages that are not unblocked. (key packages: 7)

How do we compare to the Squeeze and Wheezy release cycles?

Week Squeeze Wheezy Jessie 43 284 (213+71) 468 (332+136) 319 (240+79) 44 261 (201+60) 408 (265+143) 274 (224+50) 45 261 (205+56) 425 (291+134) 295 (229+66) 46 271 (200+71) 401 (258+143) 427 (313+114) 47 283 (209+74) 366 (221+145) 342 (260+82) 48 256 (177+79) 378 (230+148) 274 (189+85) 49 256 (180+76) 360 (216+155) 226 (147+79) 50 204 (148+56) 339 (195+144) ??? 51 178 (124+54) 323 (190+133) 189 (134+55) 52 115 (78+37) 289 (190+99) 147 (112+35) 1 93 (60+33) 287 (171+116) 140 (104+36) 2 82 (46+36) 271 (162+109) 157 (124+33) 3 25 (15+10) 249 (165+84) 172 (128+44) 4 14 (8+6) 244 (176+68) 187 (132+55) 5 2 (0+2) 224 (132+92) 175 (124+51) 6 release! 212 (129+83) 161 (109+52) 7 release+1 194 (128+66) 147 (106+41) 8 release+2 206 (144+62) 147 (96+51) 9 release+3 174 (105+69) 152 (101+51) 10 release+4 120 (72+48) 112 (82+30) 11 release+5 115 (74+41) 97 (68+29) 12 release+6 93 (47+46) 87 (71+16) 13 release+7 50 (24+26) 97 (77+20) 14 release+8 51 (32+19) 15 release+9 39 (32+7) 16 release+10 20 (12+8) 17 release+11 24 (19+5) 18 release+12 2 (2+0)

Graphical overview of bug stats thanks to azhag:

Categories: FLOSS Project Planets

Python Software Foundation: To sublicense or not to sublicense? That is the election.

Planet Python - Fri, 2015-03-27 15:33
Earlier this month, the PSF opened an election on two issues: the first was a straightforward vote on the adoption of new Sponsor Members; the second was more experimental: a non-binding vote for the membership to weigh in on a complex issue to be decided by the Board. This poll was part of the larger project (featured in several recent blog posts, see, for example, Let’s Make Decisions to make the PSF a more inclusive, diverse, and democratic organization. Source: National Museum of American History. PD-USGOV The election was closed yesterday, March 26th. The results can be found at Election 9 Results and are as follows: Sponsor Members, Bloomburg LP, Fastly and Infinite Code were all voted in by large margins. Sponsor Member Candidatesyesnoabstain Bloomberg LP174728 Fastly193313 Infinite Code1471349 The second issue: The PSF Board of Directors is seeking the collective perspective of PSF Voting Members on the appropriate handling of video recording sublicensing for presentations at PyCon US (see Membership Vote).  This poll sought members' views along two dimensions of the sublicensing issue: the entities to whom licenses should be granted; and the timeframe of the videos to be licensed. The results of the poll were quite divided. Sublicense entities Only YouTube (others embedding)As many mirrors as possibleOnly non-commercial mirrors 1710468 Sublicense timeframe Prospectively onlyIncluding retroactivelyNot applicable 87889 The PSF wishes to thank everyone who participated. This input of the membership is extremely valuable to the PSF, and this was a useful first run at use of non-binding polls. There will be a lot more discussion around this topic while the Board continues to weigh pros and cons prior to making the decision that best supports the interests of the membership. Please feel free to comment on this Blog, on Twitter, to the PSF (or in the Hallway Track in Montreal). I would love to hear from readers. Please send feedback, comments, or blog ideas to me at msushi@gnosis.cx.
Categories: FLOSS Project Planets
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