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Russ Allbery: INN 2.5.5

Mon, 2015-07-06 01:13

(This release has actually been ready for a while, but there were a few technical difficulties with getting it copied up to the right places, and then I got very distracted by various life stuff.)

This is the first new release of INN in about a year, and hopefully the last in the 2.5.x series. A beta release of INN 2.6.0 will be announced shortly (probably tomorrow).

As is typical for bug-fix releases, this release rolls up a bunch of small bug fixes that have been made over the past year. The most notable changes include new inn.conf parameters to fine-tune the SSL/TLS configuration for nnrpd (generally to tighten it over the OpenSSL defaults), a few new flags to various utilities, multiple improvements to pullnews, and support for properly stopping cnfsstat and innwatch if INN is started and then quickly stopped.

As always, thanks to Julien ÉLIE for preparing this release and doing most of the maintenance work on INN!

You can get the latest version from the official ISC download page or from my personal INN pages. The latter also has links to the full changelog and the other INN documentation.

Categories: FLOSS Project Planets

Ben Armstrong: BLT Bike Trail – Early Summer 2015

Sun, 2015-07-05 16:26

This is one of my regular walking routes, from home to Five Island Lake and back. It’s about 15 km. I usually walk too briskly to capture the many visual delights of this route. Today on the trip out, I stopped and took several photos to share with you.

[slb_group]

An early morning walk up the BLT bike trail to Five Island Lake (pictured here) and back. Click to start the slideshow.

The walk starts from our subdivision. It’s cool and clear when I leave.

Saskatoon berries Saskatoon berries Saskatoon berries Dew on leaves Dew on leaves Pitcher plants Something’s attacking this alder. Maybe woolly aphids?

Wild strawberries Wild strawberry Wild strawberry Wild strawberry Wild strawberries Daisy Daisy Vetch Vetch Water lily Water lily

Sensitive fern Squirrel! Cranberry Lake

Cranberry Lake
[/slb_group]

Categories: FLOSS Project Planets

Thorsten Alteholz: My Debian Activities in June 2015

Sun, 2015-07-05 15:51

FTP assistant

This month I marked 539 packages for accept, rejected 61 of them and had to send 24 emails to maintainers. This is a new personal record. Even in the month before the Jessie freeze I accepted only 407 packages. So, very well done (self-laudation has to happen from time to time ).

Another record was broken as well. After 19 month of doing this kind of work, I got my first insulting email. I would prefer to wait another 19 month before I get the next one …

Squeeze LTS

This was my twelfth month that I did some work for the Squeeze LTS initiative, started by Raphael Hertzog at Freexian.

This month I got assigned a workload of only 14.5h and I spent most of it to work on a new upload of php5. Unfortunately there have been so many CVEs comming in, that I didn’t do an upload yet.

Other stuff I uploaded was

  • [DLA 258-1] jqueryui security update
  • [DLA 262-1] libcrypto++ security update

This month I also had my first one and a half weeks of doing frontdesk work. As introduced in this email, every member of the LTS team should do some LTS CVE triage. Up to now it was mainly done by Raphael and he wants to share this task with everybody else. So I answered questions on the IRC channel, on the LTS list and looked for CVEs that are important for Squeeze LTS or could be ignored.

Other stuff

This month I also uploaded a new version of harminv and wondered why the package didn’t move to testing. Of course there is a document how to do a transition of a library properly. But hey, it is me, I know everything better and of course I can use a shortcut. Oh boy, I was wrong. So I also uploaded new versions of meep, meep-lam4, meep-openmpi, meep-mpi-default and meep-mpich2.

And the moral of the story: If you don’t understand why something should be done in a specific way, you shouldn’t try to do it different.

Donations

Again, thanks alot to all donors. I really appreciate this and hope that everybody is pleased with my commitment. Don’t hesitate to make suggestions for improvements.

Categories: FLOSS Project Planets

Petter Reinholdtsen: New laptop - some more clues and ideas based on feedback

Sun, 2015-07-05 15:40

Several people contacted me after my previous blog post about my need for a new laptop, and provided very useful feedback. I wish to thank every one of these. Several pointed me to the possibility of fixing my X230, and I am already in the process of getting Lenovo to do so thanks to the on site, next day support contract covering the machine. But the battery is almost useless (I expect to replace it with a non-official battery) and I do not expect the machine to live for many more years, so it is time to plan its replacement. If I did not have a support contract, it was suggested to find replacement parts using FrancEcrans, but it might present a language barrier as I do not understand French.

One tip I got was to use the Skinflint web service to compare laptop models. It seem to have more models available than prisjakt.no. Another tip I got from someone I know have similar keyboard preferences was that the HP EliteBook 840 keyboard is not very good, and this matches my experience with earlier EliteBook keyboards I tested. Because of this, I will not consider it any further.

When I wrote my blog post, I was not aware of Thinkpad X250, the newest Thinkpad X model. The keyboard reintroduces mouse buttons (which is missing from the X240), and is working fairly well with Debian Sid/Unstable according to Corsac.net. The reports I got on the keyboard quality are not consistent. Some say the keyboard is good, others say it is ok, while others say it is not very good. Those with experience from X41 and and X60 agree that the X250 keyboard is not as good as those trusty old laptops, and suggest I keep and fix my X230 instead of upgrading, or get a used X230 to replace it. I'm also told that the X250 lack leds for caps lock, disk activity and battery status, which is very convenient on my X230. I'm also told that the CPU fan is running very often, making it a bit noisy. In any case, the X250 do not work out of the box with Debian Stable/Jessie, one of my requirements.

I have also gotten a few vendor proposals, one was Pro-Star, another was Libreboot. The latter look very attractive to me.

Again, thank you all for the very useful feedback. It help a lot as I keep looking for a replacement.

Categories: FLOSS Project Planets

Sjoerd Simons: Debian Jessie on Raspberry Pi 2

Sun, 2015-07-05 14:06

Apart from being somewhat slow, one of the downsides of the original Raspberry Pi SoC was that it had an old ARM11 core which implements the ARMv6 architecture. This was particularly unfortunate as most common distributions (Debian, Ubuntu, Fedora, etc) standardized on the ARMv7-A architecture as a minimum for their ARM hardfloat ports. Which is one of the reasons for Raspbian and the various other RPI specific distributions.

Happily, with the new Raspberry Pi 2 using Cortex-A7 Cores (which implement the ARMv7-A architecture) this issue is out of the way, which means that a a standard Debian hardfloat userland will run just fine. So the obvious first thing to do when an RPI 2 appeared on my desk was to put together a quick Debian Jessie image for it.

The result of which can be found at: https://images.collabora.co.uk/rpi2/

Login as root with password debian (Obviously do change the password and create a normal user after booting). The image is 3G, so should fit on any SD card marketed as 4G or bigger. Using bmap-tools for flashing is recommended, otherwise you'll be waiting for 2.5G of zeros to be written to the card, which tends to be rather boring. Note that the image is really basic and will just get you to a login prompt on either serial or hdmi, batteries are very much not included, but can be apt-getted :).

Technically, this image is simply a Debian Jessie debootstrap with a extra packages for hardware support. Unlike Raspbian the first partition (which contains the firmware & kernel files to boot the system) is mounted on /boot/firmware rather then on /boot. This is because the VideoCore expects the first partition to be a FAT filesystem, but mounting FAT on /boot really doesn't work right on Debian systems as it contains files managed by dpkg (e.g. the kernel package) which requires a POSIX compatible filesystem. Essentially the same reason why Debian is using /boot/efi for the ESP partition on Intel systems rather the mounting it on /boot directly.

For reference, the RPI2 specific packages in this image are from https://repositories.collabora.co.uk/debian/ in the jessie distribution and rpi2 component (this repository is enabled by default on the image). The relevant packages there are:

  • linux: Current 3.18 based package from Debian experimental (3.18.5-1~exp1 at the time of this writing) with a stack of patches on top from the raspberrypi github repository and tweaked to build an rpi2 flavour as the patchset isn't multiplatform capable
  • raspberrypi-firmware-nokernel: Firmware package and misc libraries packages taken from Raspbian, with a slight tweak to install in /boot/firmware rather then /boot.
  • flash-kernel: Current flash-kernel package from debian experimental, with a small addition to detect the RPI 2 and "flash" the kernel to /boot/firmware/kernel7.img (which is what the GPU will try to boot on this board).

For the future, it would be nice to see the Raspberry Pi 2 support out of the box on Debian. For that to happen, the most important thing would be to have some mainline kernel support for this board (supporting multiplatform!) so it can be build as part of debians armmp kernel flavour. And ideally, having the firmware load a bootloader (such as u-boot) rather than a kernel directly to allow for a much more flexible boot sequence and support for using an initramfs (u-boot has some support for the original Raspberry Pi, so adding Raspberry Pi 2 support should hopefully not be too tricky)

Update: An updated image (20150705) is available with the latest packages from Jessie and a GPG key that's not expired :).

Categories: FLOSS Project Planets

Dominique Dumont: Major bug fix for cme update copyright command

Sun, 2015-07-05 05:46

Hello

Previous version of libconfig-model-dpkg-perl had 2 bugs related to copyright update command :

  • Too many directory paragraphs (like src/foo/*) were removed during update.
  • Some file paragraph were not merged, leading to needless paragraphs in debian/copyright file. This bug is less severe as no information is lost

Version 2.067 of libconfig-model-dpkg-perl fixes both issues. This version is available in unstable.

To use cme update dpkg-copyright command, the following packages are required:

All the best


Categories: FLOSS Project Planets

Robert Edmonds: Git packaging workflow for py-lmdb

Sat, 2015-07-04 20:56

Recently, I packaged the py-lmdb Python binding for the LMDB database library. This package is going to be team maintained by the pkg-db group, which is responsible for maintaining BerkeleyDB and LMDB packages. Below are my notes on (re-)Debianizing this package and how the Git repository for the source package is laid out.

The upstream py-lmdb developer has a Git-centric workflow. Development is done on the master branch, with regular releases done as fast-forward merges to the release branch. Release tags of the form py-lmdb_X.YZ are provided. The only tarballs provided are the ones that GitHub automatically generates from tags. Since these tarballs are synthetic and the content of these tarballs matches the content on the corresponding tag, we will ignore them in favor of using the release tags directly. (The --git-pristine-tar-commit option to gbp-buildpackage will be used so that .orig.tar.gz files can be replicated so that the Debian archive will accept subsequent uploads, but tarballs are otherwise irrelevant to our workflow.)

To make it clear that the release tags come from upstream's repository, they should be prefixed with upstream/, which would preferably result in a DEP-14 compliant scheme. (Unfortunately, since upstream's release tags begin with py-lmdb_, this doesn't quite match the pattern that DEP-14 recommends.)

Here is how the local packaging repository is initialized. Note that git clone isn't used, so that we can customize how the tags are fetched. Instead, we create an empty Git repository and add the upstream repository as the upstream remote. The --no-tags option is used, so that git fetch does not import the remote's tags. However, we also add a custom fetch refspec refs/tags/*:refs/tags/upstream/* so that the remote's tags are explicitly fetched, but with the upstream/ prefix.

$ mkdir py-lmdb $ cd py-lmdb $ git init Initialized empty Git repository in /home/edmonds/debian/py-lmdb/.git/ $ git remote add --no-tags upstream https://github.com/dw/py-lmdb $ git config --add remote.upstream.fetch 'refs/tags/*:refs/tags/upstream/*' $ git fetch upstream remote: Counting objects: 3336, done. remote: Total 3336 (delta 0), reused 0 (delta 0), pack-reused 3336 Receiving objects: 100% (3336/3336), 2.15 MiB | 0 bytes/s, done. Resolving deltas: 100% (1958/1958), done. From https://github.com/dw/py-lmdb * [new branch] master -> upstream/master * [new branch] release -> upstream/release * [new branch] win32-sparse-patch -> upstream/win32-sparse-patch * [new tag] last-cython-version -> upstream/last-cython-version * [new tag] py-lmdb_0.1 -> upstream/py-lmdb_0.1 * [new tag] py-lmdb_0.2 -> upstream/py-lmdb_0.2 * [new tag] py-lmdb_0.3 -> upstream/py-lmdb_0.3 * [new tag] py-lmdb_0.4 -> upstream/py-lmdb_0.4 * [new tag] py-lmdb_0.5 -> upstream/py-lmdb_0.5 * [new tag] py-lmdb_0.51 -> upstream/py-lmdb_0.51 * [new tag] py-lmdb_0.52 -> upstream/py-lmdb_0.52 * [new tag] py-lmdb_0.53 -> upstream/py-lmdb_0.53 * [new tag] py-lmdb_0.54 -> upstream/py-lmdb_0.54 * [new tag] py-lmdb_0.56 -> upstream/py-lmdb_0.56 * [new tag] py-lmdb_0.57 -> upstream/py-lmdb_0.57 * [new tag] py-lmdb_0.58 -> upstream/py-lmdb_0.58 * [new tag] py-lmdb_0.59 -> upstream/py-lmdb_0.59 * [new tag] py-lmdb_0.60 -> upstream/py-lmdb_0.60 * [new tag] py-lmdb_0.61 -> upstream/py-lmdb_0.61 * [new tag] py-lmdb_0.62 -> upstream/py-lmdb_0.62 * [new tag] py-lmdb_0.63 -> upstream/py-lmdb_0.63 * [new tag] py-lmdb_0.64 -> upstream/py-lmdb_0.64 * [new tag] py-lmdb_0.65 -> upstream/py-lmdb_0.65 * [new tag] py-lmdb_0.66 -> upstream/py-lmdb_0.66 * [new tag] py-lmdb_0.67 -> upstream/py-lmdb_0.67 * [new tag] py-lmdb_0.68 -> upstream/py-lmdb_0.68 * [new tag] py-lmdb_0.69 -> upstream/py-lmdb_0.69 * [new tag] py-lmdb_0.70 -> upstream/py-lmdb_0.70 * [new tag] py-lmdb_0.71 -> upstream/py-lmdb_0.71 * [new tag] py-lmdb_0.72 -> upstream/py-lmdb_0.72 * [new tag] py-lmdb_0.73 -> upstream/py-lmdb_0.73 * [new tag] py-lmdb_0.74 -> upstream/py-lmdb_0.74 * [new tag] py-lmdb_0.75 -> upstream/py-lmdb_0.75 * [new tag] py-lmdb_0.76 -> upstream/py-lmdb_0.76 * [new tag] py-lmdb_0.77 -> upstream/py-lmdb_0.77 * [new tag] py-lmdb_0.78 -> upstream/py-lmdb_0.78 * [new tag] py-lmdb_0.79 -> upstream/py-lmdb_0.79 * [new tag] py-lmdb_0.80 -> upstream/py-lmdb_0.80 * [new tag] py-lmdb_0.81 -> upstream/py-lmdb_0.81 * [new tag] py-lmdb_0.82 -> upstream/py-lmdb_0.82 * [new tag] py-lmdb_0.83 -> upstream/py-lmdb_0.83 * [new tag] py-lmdb_0.84 -> upstream/py-lmdb_0.84 * [new tag] py-lmdb_0.85 -> upstream/py-lmdb_0.85 * [new tag] py-lmdb_0.86 -> upstream/py-lmdb_0.86 $

Note that at this point we have content from the upstream remote in our local repository, but we don't have any local branches:

$ git status On branch master Initial commit nothing to commit (create/copy files and use "git add" to track) $ git branch -a remotes/upstream/master remotes/upstream/release remotes/upstream/win32-sparse-patch $

We will use the DEP-14 naming scheme for the packaging branches, so the branch for packages targeted at unstable will be called debian/sid. Since I already made an initial 0.84-1 upload, we need to start the debian/sid branch from the upstream 0.84 tag and import the original packaging content from that upload. The --no-track flag is passed to git checkout initially so that Git doesn't consider the upstream release tag upstream/py-lmdb_0.84 to be the upstream branch for our packaging branch.

$ git checkout --no-track -b debian/sid upstream/py-lmdb_0.84 Switched to a new branch 'debian/sid' $

At this point I imported the original packaging content for 0.84-1 with git am. Then, I signed the debian/0.84-1 tag:

$ git tag -s -m 'Debian release 0.84-1' debian/0.84-1 $ git verify-tag debian/0.84-1 gpg: Signature made Sat 04 Jul 2015 02:49:42 PM EDT using RSA key ID AAF6CDAE gpg: Good signature from "Robert Edmonds <edmonds@mycre.ws>" [ultimate] gpg: aka "Robert Edmonds <edmonds@fsi.io>" [ultimate] gpg: aka "Robert Edmonds <edmonds@debian.org>" [ultimate] $

New upstream releases are integrated by fetching new upstream tags and non-fast-forward merging into the packaging branch. The latest release is 0.86, so we merge from the upstream/py-lmdb_0.86 tag.

$ git fetch upstream --dry-run [...] $ git fetch upstream [...] $ git checkout debian/sid Already on 'debian/sid' $ git merge --no-ff --no-edit upstream/py-lmdb_0.86 Merge made by the 'recursive' strategy. ChangeLog | 46 ++++++++++++++ docs/index.rst | 46 +++++++++++++- docs/themes/acid/layout.html | 4 +- examples/dirtybench-gdbm.py | 6 ++ examples/dirtybench.py | 19 ++++++ examples/nastybench.py | 18 ++++-- examples/parabench.py | 6 ++ lib/lmdb.h | 37 ++++++----- lib/mdb.c | 281 ++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++--------------------- lib/midl.c | 2 +- lib/midl.h | 2 +- lib/py-lmdb/preload.h | 48 ++++++++++++++ lmdb/__init__.py | 2 +- lmdb/cffi.py | 120 ++++++++++++++++++++++++----------- lmdb/cpython.c | 86 +++++++++++++++++++------ lmdb/tool.py | 5 +- misc/gdb.commands | 21 ++++++ misc/runtests-travisci.sh | 3 +- misc/runtests-ubuntu-12-04.sh | 28 ++++---- setup.py | 2 + tests/crash_test.py | 22 +++++++ tests/cursor_test.py | 37 +++++++++++ tests/env_test.py | 73 +++++++++++++++++++++ tests/testlib.py | 14 +++- tests/txn_test.py | 20 ++++++ 25 files changed, 773 insertions(+), 175 deletions(-) create mode 100644 lib/py-lmdb/preload.h create mode 100644 misc/gdb.commands $

Here I did some additional development work like editing the debian/gbp.conf file and applying a fix for #790738 to make the package build reproducibly. The package is now ready for an 0.86-1 upload, so I ran the following gbp dch command:

$ gbp dch --release --auto --new-version=0.86-1 --commit gbp:info: Found tag for topmost changelog version '6bdbb56c04571fe2d5d22aa0287ab0dc83959de5' gbp:info: Continuing from commit '6bdbb56c04571fe2d5d22aa0287ab0dc83959de5' gbp:info: Changelog has been committed for version 0.86-1 $

This automatically generates a changelog entry for 0.86-1, but it includes commit summaries for all of the upstream commits since the last release, which I had to edit out.

Then, I used gbp buildpackage with BUILDER=pbuilder to build the package in a clean, up-to-date sid chroot. After checking the result, I signed the debian/0.86-1 tag:

$ git tag -s -m 'Debian release 0.86-1' debian/0.86-1 $

The package is now ready to be pushed to git.debian.org. First, a bare repository is initialized:

$ ssh git.debian.org edmonds@moszumanska:~$ cd /srv/git.debian.org/git/pkg-db/ edmonds@moszumanska:/srv/git.debian.org/git/pkg-db$ umask 002 edmonds@moszumanska:/srv/git.debian.org/git/pkg-db$ mkdir py-lmdb.git edmonds@moszumanska:/srv/git.debian.org/git/pkg-db$ cd py-lmdb.git/ edmonds@moszumanska:/srv/git.debian.org/git/pkg-db/py-lmdb.git$ git --bare init --shared Initialized empty shared Git repository in /srv/git.debian.org/git/pkg-db/py-lmdb.git/ edmonds@moszumanska:/srv/git.debian.org/git/pkg-db/py-lmdb.git$ echo 'py-lmdb Debian packaging' > description edmonds@moszumanska:/srv/git.debian.org/git/pkg-db/py-lmdb.git$ mv hooks/post-update.sample hooks/post-update edmonds@moszumanska:/srv/git.debian.org/git/pkg-db/py-lmdb.git$ chmod a+x hooks/post-update edmonds@moszumanska:/srv/git.debian.org/git/pkg-db/py-lmdb.git$ logout Shared connection to git.debian.org closed.

Then, we add a new debian remote to our local packaging repository. Per our repository conventions, we need to ensure that only branch names matching debian/* and pristine-tar and tag names matching debian/* and upstream/* are pushed to the debian remote when we run git push debian, so we add a a set of remote.debian.push refspecs that correspond to these conventions. We also add an explicit remote.debian.fetch refspec to fetch tags.

$ git remote add debian ssh://git.debian.org/git/pkg-db/py-lmdb.git $ git config --add remote.debian.push 'refs/tags/debian/*' $ git config --add remote.debian.push 'refs/tags/upstream/*' $ git config --add remote.debian.push 'refs/heads/debian/*' $ git config --add remote.debian.push 'refs/heads/pristine-tar' $ git config --add remote.debian.fetch 'refs/tags/*:refs/tags/*'

We now run the initial push to the remote Git repository. The --set-upstream option is used so that our local branches will be configured to track the corresponding remote branches. Also note that the debian/* and upstream/* tags are pushed as well.

$ git push debian --set-upstream Counting objects: 3333, done. Delta compression using up to 8 threads. Compressing objects: 100% (1083/1083), done. Writing objects: 100% (3333/3333), 1.37 MiB | 0 bytes/s, done. Total 3333 (delta 2231), reused 3314 (delta 2218) To ssh://git.debian.org/git/pkg-db/py-lmdb.git * [new branch] pristine-tar -> pristine-tar * [new branch] debian/sid -> debian/sid * [new tag] debian/0.84-1 -> debian/0.84-1 * [new tag] debian/0.86-1 -> debian/0.86-1 * [new tag] upstream/last-cython-version -> upstream/last-cython-version * [new tag] upstream/py-lmdb_0.1 -> upstream/py-lmdb_0.1 * [new tag] upstream/py-lmdb_0.2 -> upstream/py-lmdb_0.2 * [new tag] upstream/py-lmdb_0.3 -> upstream/py-lmdb_0.3 * [new tag] upstream/py-lmdb_0.4 -> upstream/py-lmdb_0.4 * [new tag] upstream/py-lmdb_0.5 -> upstream/py-lmdb_0.5 * [new tag] upstream/py-lmdb_0.51 -> upstream/py-lmdb_0.51 * [new tag] upstream/py-lmdb_0.52 -> upstream/py-lmdb_0.52 * [new tag] upstream/py-lmdb_0.53 -> upstream/py-lmdb_0.53 * [new tag] upstream/py-lmdb_0.54 -> upstream/py-lmdb_0.54 * [new tag] upstream/py-lmdb_0.56 -> upstream/py-lmdb_0.56 * [new tag] upstream/py-lmdb_0.57 -> upstream/py-lmdb_0.57 * [new tag] upstream/py-lmdb_0.58 -> upstream/py-lmdb_0.58 * [new tag] upstream/py-lmdb_0.59 -> upstream/py-lmdb_0.59 * [new tag] upstream/py-lmdb_0.60 -> upstream/py-lmdb_0.60 * [new tag] upstream/py-lmdb_0.61 -> upstream/py-lmdb_0.61 * [new tag] upstream/py-lmdb_0.62 -> upstream/py-lmdb_0.62 * [new tag] upstream/py-lmdb_0.63 -> upstream/py-lmdb_0.63 * [new tag] upstream/py-lmdb_0.64 -> upstream/py-lmdb_0.64 * [new tag] upstream/py-lmdb_0.65 -> upstream/py-lmdb_0.65 * [new tag] upstream/py-lmdb_0.66 -> upstream/py-lmdb_0.66 * [new tag] upstream/py-lmdb_0.67 -> upstream/py-lmdb_0.67 * [new tag] upstream/py-lmdb_0.68 -> upstream/py-lmdb_0.68 * [new tag] upstream/py-lmdb_0.69 -> upstream/py-lmdb_0.69 * [new tag] upstream/py-lmdb_0.70 -> upstream/py-lmdb_0.70 * [new tag] upstream/py-lmdb_0.71 -> upstream/py-lmdb_0.71 * [new tag] upstream/py-lmdb_0.72 -> upstream/py-lmdb_0.72 * [new tag] upstream/py-lmdb_0.73 -> upstream/py-lmdb_0.73 * [new tag] upstream/py-lmdb_0.74 -> upstream/py-lmdb_0.74 * [new tag] upstream/py-lmdb_0.75 -> upstream/py-lmdb_0.75 * [new tag] upstream/py-lmdb_0.76 -> upstream/py-lmdb_0.76 * [new tag] upstream/py-lmdb_0.77 -> upstream/py-lmdb_0.77 * [new tag] upstream/py-lmdb_0.78 -> upstream/py-lmdb_0.78 * [new tag] upstream/py-lmdb_0.79 -> upstream/py-lmdb_0.79 * [new tag] upstream/py-lmdb_0.80 -> upstream/py-lmdb_0.80 * [new tag] upstream/py-lmdb_0.81 -> upstream/py-lmdb_0.81 * [new tag] upstream/py-lmdb_0.82 -> upstream/py-lmdb_0.82 * [new tag] upstream/py-lmdb_0.83 -> upstream/py-lmdb_0.83 * [new tag] upstream/py-lmdb_0.84 -> upstream/py-lmdb_0.84 * [new tag] upstream/py-lmdb_0.85 -> upstream/py-lmdb_0.85 * [new tag] upstream/py-lmdb_0.86 -> upstream/py-lmdb_0.86 Branch pristine-tar set up to track remote branch pristine-tar from debian. Branch debian/sid set up to track remote branch debian/sid from debian. $

After the initial push, we need to configure the remote repository so that clones will checkout the debian/sid branch by default:

$ ssh git.debian.org edmonds@moszumanska:~$ cd /srv/git.debian.org/git/pkg-db/py-lmdb.git/ edmonds@moszumanska:/srv/git.debian.org/git/pkg-db/py-lmdb.git$ git symbolic-ref HEAD refs/heads/debian/sid edmonds@moszumanska:/srv/git.debian.org/git/pkg-db/py-lmdb.git$ logout Shared connection to git.debian.org closed.

We can check if there are any updates in upstream's Git repository with the following command:

$ git fetch upstream --dry-run -v From https://github.com/dw/py-lmdb = [up to date] master -> upstream/master = [up to date] release -> upstream/release = [up to date] win32-sparse-patch -> upstream/win32-sparse-patch = [up to date] last-cython-version -> upstream/last-cython-version = [up to date] py-lmdb_0.1 -> upstream/py-lmdb_0.1 = [up to date] py-lmdb_0.2 -> upstream/py-lmdb_0.2 = [up to date] py-lmdb_0.3 -> upstream/py-lmdb_0.3 = [up to date] py-lmdb_0.4 -> upstream/py-lmdb_0.4 = [up to date] py-lmdb_0.5 -> upstream/py-lmdb_0.5 = [up to date] py-lmdb_0.51 -> upstream/py-lmdb_0.51 = [up to date] py-lmdb_0.52 -> upstream/py-lmdb_0.52 = [up to date] py-lmdb_0.53 -> upstream/py-lmdb_0.53 = [up to date] py-lmdb_0.54 -> upstream/py-lmdb_0.54 = [up to date] py-lmdb_0.56 -> upstream/py-lmdb_0.56 = [up to date] py-lmdb_0.57 -> upstream/py-lmdb_0.57 = [up to date] py-lmdb_0.58 -> upstream/py-lmdb_0.58 = [up to date] py-lmdb_0.59 -> upstream/py-lmdb_0.59 = [up to date] py-lmdb_0.60 -> upstream/py-lmdb_0.60 = [up to date] py-lmdb_0.61 -> upstream/py-lmdb_0.61 = [up to date] py-lmdb_0.62 -> upstream/py-lmdb_0.62 = [up to date] py-lmdb_0.63 -> upstream/py-lmdb_0.63 = [up to date] py-lmdb_0.64 -> upstream/py-lmdb_0.64 = [up to date] py-lmdb_0.65 -> upstream/py-lmdb_0.65 = [up to date] py-lmdb_0.66 -> upstream/py-lmdb_0.66 = [up to date] py-lmdb_0.67 -> upstream/py-lmdb_0.67 = [up to date] py-lmdb_0.68 -> upstream/py-lmdb_0.68 = [up to date] py-lmdb_0.69 -> upstream/py-lmdb_0.69 = [up to date] py-lmdb_0.70 -> upstream/py-lmdb_0.70 = [up to date] py-lmdb_0.71 -> upstream/py-lmdb_0.71 = [up to date] py-lmdb_0.72 -> upstream/py-lmdb_0.72 = [up to date] py-lmdb_0.73 -> upstream/py-lmdb_0.73 = [up to date] py-lmdb_0.74 -> upstream/py-lmdb_0.74 = [up to date] py-lmdb_0.75 -> upstream/py-lmdb_0.75 = [up to date] py-lmdb_0.76 -> upstream/py-lmdb_0.76 = [up to date] py-lmdb_0.77 -> upstream/py-lmdb_0.77 = [up to date] py-lmdb_0.78 -> upstream/py-lmdb_0.78 = [up to date] py-lmdb_0.79 -> upstream/py-lmdb_0.79 = [up to date] py-lmdb_0.80 -> upstream/py-lmdb_0.80 = [up to date] py-lmdb_0.81 -> upstream/py-lmdb_0.81 = [up to date] py-lmdb_0.82 -> upstream/py-lmdb_0.82 = [up to date] py-lmdb_0.83 -> upstream/py-lmdb_0.83 = [up to date] py-lmdb_0.84 -> upstream/py-lmdb_0.84 = [up to date] py-lmdb_0.85 -> upstream/py-lmdb_0.85 = [up to date] py-lmdb_0.86 -> upstream/py-lmdb_0.86

We can check if any co-maintainers have pushed updates to the git.debian.org repository with the following command:

$ git fetch debian --dry-run -v From ssh://git.debian.org/git/pkg-db/py-lmdb = [up to date] debian/sid -> debian/debian/sid = [up to date] pristine-tar -> debian/pristine-tar = [up to date] debian/0.84-1 -> debian/0.84-1 = [up to date] debian/0.86-1 -> debian/0.86-1 = [up to date] upstream/last-cython-version -> upstream/last-cython-version = [up to date] upstream/py-lmdb_0.1 -> upstream/py-lmdb_0.1 = [up to date] upstream/py-lmdb_0.2 -> upstream/py-lmdb_0.2 = [up to date] upstream/py-lmdb_0.3 -> upstream/py-lmdb_0.3 = [up to date] upstream/py-lmdb_0.4 -> upstream/py-lmdb_0.4 = [up to date] upstream/py-lmdb_0.5 -> upstream/py-lmdb_0.5 = [up to date] upstream/py-lmdb_0.51 -> upstream/py-lmdb_0.51 = [up to date] upstream/py-lmdb_0.52 -> upstream/py-lmdb_0.52 = [up to date] upstream/py-lmdb_0.53 -> upstream/py-lmdb_0.53 = [up to date] upstream/py-lmdb_0.54 -> upstream/py-lmdb_0.54 = [up to date] upstream/py-lmdb_0.56 -> upstream/py-lmdb_0.56 = [up to date] upstream/py-lmdb_0.57 -> upstream/py-lmdb_0.57 = [up to date] upstream/py-lmdb_0.58 -> upstream/py-lmdb_0.58 = [up to date] upstream/py-lmdb_0.59 -> upstream/py-lmdb_0.59 = [up to date] upstream/py-lmdb_0.60 -> upstream/py-lmdb_0.60 = [up to date] upstream/py-lmdb_0.61 -> upstream/py-lmdb_0.61 = [up to date] upstream/py-lmdb_0.62 -> upstream/py-lmdb_0.62 = [up to date] upstream/py-lmdb_0.63 -> upstream/py-lmdb_0.63 = [up to date] upstream/py-lmdb_0.64 -> upstream/py-lmdb_0.64 = [up to date] upstream/py-lmdb_0.65 -> upstream/py-lmdb_0.65 = [up to date] upstream/py-lmdb_0.66 -> upstream/py-lmdb_0.66 = [up to date] upstream/py-lmdb_0.67 -> upstream/py-lmdb_0.67 = [up to date] upstream/py-lmdb_0.68 -> upstream/py-lmdb_0.68 = [up to date] upstream/py-lmdb_0.69 -> upstream/py-lmdb_0.69 = [up to date] upstream/py-lmdb_0.70 -> upstream/py-lmdb_0.70 = [up to date] upstream/py-lmdb_0.71 -> upstream/py-lmdb_0.71 = [up to date] upstream/py-lmdb_0.72 -> upstream/py-lmdb_0.72 = [up to date] upstream/py-lmdb_0.73 -> upstream/py-lmdb_0.73 = [up to date] upstream/py-lmdb_0.74 -> upstream/py-lmdb_0.74 = [up to date] upstream/py-lmdb_0.75 -> upstream/py-lmdb_0.75 = [up to date] upstream/py-lmdb_0.76 -> upstream/py-lmdb_0.76 = [up to date] upstream/py-lmdb_0.77 -> upstream/py-lmdb_0.77 = [up to date] upstream/py-lmdb_0.78 -> upstream/py-lmdb_0.78 = [up to date] upstream/py-lmdb_0.79 -> upstream/py-lmdb_0.79 = [up to date] upstream/py-lmdb_0.80 -> upstream/py-lmdb_0.80 = [up to date] upstream/py-lmdb_0.81 -> upstream/py-lmdb_0.81 = [up to date] upstream/py-lmdb_0.82 -> upstream/py-lmdb_0.82 = [up to date] upstream/py-lmdb_0.83 -> upstream/py-lmdb_0.83 = [up to date] upstream/py-lmdb_0.84 -> upstream/py-lmdb_0.84 = [up to date] upstream/py-lmdb_0.85 -> upstream/py-lmdb_0.85 = [up to date] upstream/py-lmdb_0.86 -> upstream/py-lmdb_0.86 $

We can check if anything needs to be pushed from our local repository to the git.debian.org repository with the following command:

$ git push debian --dry-run -v Pushing to ssh://git.debian.org/git/pkg-db/py-lmdb.git To ssh://git.debian.org/git/pkg-db/py-lmdb.git = [up to date] debian/sid -> debian/sid = [up to date] pristine-tar -> pristine-tar = [up to date] debian/0.84-1 -> debian/0.84-1 = [up to date] debian/0.86-1 -> debian/0.86-1 = [up to date] upstream/last-cython-version -> upstream/last-cython-version = [up to date] upstream/py-lmdb_0.1 -> upstream/py-lmdb_0.1 = [up to date] upstream/py-lmdb_0.2 -> upstream/py-lmdb_0.2 = [up to date] upstream/py-lmdb_0.3 -> upstream/py-lmdb_0.3 = [up to date] upstream/py-lmdb_0.4 -> upstream/py-lmdb_0.4 = [up to date] upstream/py-lmdb_0.5 -> upstream/py-lmdb_0.5 = [up to date] upstream/py-lmdb_0.51 -> upstream/py-lmdb_0.51 = [up to date] upstream/py-lmdb_0.52 -> upstream/py-lmdb_0.52 = [up to date] upstream/py-lmdb_0.53 -> upstream/py-lmdb_0.53 = [up to date] upstream/py-lmdb_0.54 -> upstream/py-lmdb_0.54 = [up to date] upstream/py-lmdb_0.56 -> upstream/py-lmdb_0.56 = [up to date] upstream/py-lmdb_0.57 -> upstream/py-lmdb_0.57 = [up to date] upstream/py-lmdb_0.58 -> upstream/py-lmdb_0.58 = [up to date] upstream/py-lmdb_0.59 -> upstream/py-lmdb_0.59 = [up to date] upstream/py-lmdb_0.60 -> upstream/py-lmdb_0.60 = [up to date] upstream/py-lmdb_0.61 -> upstream/py-lmdb_0.61 = [up to date] upstream/py-lmdb_0.62 -> upstream/py-lmdb_0.62 = [up to date] upstream/py-lmdb_0.63 -> upstream/py-lmdb_0.63 = [up to date] upstream/py-lmdb_0.64 -> upstream/py-lmdb_0.64 = [up to date] upstream/py-lmdb_0.65 -> upstream/py-lmdb_0.65 = [up to date] upstream/py-lmdb_0.66 -> upstream/py-lmdb_0.66 = [up to date] upstream/py-lmdb_0.67 -> upstream/py-lmdb_0.67 = [up to date] upstream/py-lmdb_0.68 -> upstream/py-lmdb_0.68 = [up to date] upstream/py-lmdb_0.69 -> upstream/py-lmdb_0.69 = [up to date] upstream/py-lmdb_0.70 -> upstream/py-lmdb_0.70 = [up to date] upstream/py-lmdb_0.71 -> upstream/py-lmdb_0.71 = [up to date] upstream/py-lmdb_0.72 -> upstream/py-lmdb_0.72 = [up to date] upstream/py-lmdb_0.73 -> upstream/py-lmdb_0.73 = [up to date] upstream/py-lmdb_0.74 -> upstream/py-lmdb_0.74 = [up to date] upstream/py-lmdb_0.75 -> upstream/py-lmdb_0.75 = [up to date] upstream/py-lmdb_0.76 -> upstream/py-lmdb_0.76 = [up to date] upstream/py-lmdb_0.77 -> upstream/py-lmdb_0.77 = [up to date] upstream/py-lmdb_0.78 -> upstream/py-lmdb_0.78 = [up to date] upstream/py-lmdb_0.79 -> upstream/py-lmdb_0.79 = [up to date] upstream/py-lmdb_0.80 -> upstream/py-lmdb_0.80 = [up to date] upstream/py-lmdb_0.81 -> upstream/py-lmdb_0.81 = [up to date] upstream/py-lmdb_0.82 -> upstream/py-lmdb_0.82 = [up to date] upstream/py-lmdb_0.83 -> upstream/py-lmdb_0.83 = [up to date] upstream/py-lmdb_0.84 -> upstream/py-lmdb_0.84 = [up to date] upstream/py-lmdb_0.85 -> upstream/py-lmdb_0.85 = [up to date] upstream/py-lmdb_0.86 -> upstream/py-lmdb_0.86 Everything up-to-date

Finally, in order to set up a fresh local clone of the git.debian.org repository that's configured like the local repository created above, we have to do the following:

$ git clone --origin debian ssh://git.debian.org/git/pkg-db/py-lmdb.git Cloning into 'py-lmdb'... remote: Counting objects: 3333, done. remote: Compressing objects: 100% (1070/1070), done. remote: Total 3333 (delta 2231), reused 3333 (delta 2231) Receiving objects: 100% (3333/3333), 1.37 MiB | 1.11 MiB/s, done. Resolving deltas: 100% (2231/2231), done. Checking connectivity... done. $ cd py-lmdb $ git remote add --no-tags upstream https://github.com/dw/py-lmdb $ git config --add remote.upstream.fetch 'refs/tags/*:refs/tags/upstream/*' $ git fetch upstream remote: Counting objects: 56, done. remote: Total 56 (delta 25), reused 25 (delta 25), pack-reused 31 Unpacking objects: 100% (56/56), done. From https://github.com/dw/py-lmdb * [new branch] master -> upstream/master * [new branch] release -> upstream/release * [new branch] win32-sparse-patch -> upstream/win32-sparse-patch $ git branch --track pristine-tar debian/pristine-tar Branch pristine-tar set up to track remote branch pristine-tar from debian. $ git config --add remote.debian.push 'refs/tags/debian/*' $ git config --add remote.debian.push 'refs/tags/upstream/*' $ git config --add remote.debian.push 'refs/heads/debian/*' $ git config --add remote.debian.push 'refs/heads/pristine-tar' $ git config --add remote.debian.fetch 'refs/tags/*:refs/tags/*' $

This is a fair amount of effort beyond a simple git clone, though, so I wonder if anything can be done to optimize this.

Categories: FLOSS Project Planets

Guido Günther: Debian work in June 2015

Sat, 2015-07-04 06:46

June was the second month I contributed to Debian LTS under the Freexian umbrella. In total I spent ten hours working on:

Besides that I did CVE triaging of 17 CVEs to check if and how they affect oldoldstable security. The information provided by the Security team on these issues in data/CVE/list is an awesome help here. So I tried to be as verbose when triaging CVEs that weren't looked at for Wheezy or Jessie yet.

On non LTS time I patched our lts-cve-triage tool to allow to skip packages that are already in dla-needed.txt. This avoids wasting time on CVEs that were already triaged.

Categories: FLOSS Project Planets

Norbert Preining: Debian/TeX Live 2015.20150703-1

Fri, 2015-07-03 11:08

The first upload of new packages after TeX Live 2015 hit unstable. Against my expectations, the bugs didn’t come in in the thousands, more or less there were only some fixes necessary in the binary package, which lead to a few updates over the last week. This upload fixes an RC bug (missing replaces), and also takes a step further in the Debianization of the packages: I finally removed texconfig and texlinks programs, as they are not useful on Debian, and should actually not be used.

Besides a few other fixes, of course there was the usual chore of package updates.

Updated packages

babel-french, biblatex-fiwi, biblatex-opcit-booktitle, c90, chemformula, chemgreek, cjkutils, ctex, curve2e, dozenal, eledmac, elements, enotez, garuda-c90, koma-script, l3build, latex, leadsheets, norasi-c90, pkuthss, poemscol, pstricks, pst-solides3d, siunitx, termmenu, texlive-scripts, tudscr, upmethodology, xindy.

New packages

arabi-add, br-lex.

Enjoy.

Categories: FLOSS Project Planets

Petter Reinholdtsen: Time to find a new laptop, as the old one is broken after only two years

Fri, 2015-07-03 01:10

My primary work horse laptop is failing, and will need a replacement soon. The left 5 cm of the screen on my Thinkpad X230 started flickering yesterday, and I suspect the cause is a broken cable, as changing the angle of the screen some times get rid of the flickering.

My requirements have not really changed since I bought it, and is still as I described them in 2013. The last time I bought a laptop, I had good help from prisjakt.no where I could select at least a few of the requirements (mouse pin, wifi, weight) and go through the rest manually. Three button mouse and a good keyboard is not available as an option, and all the three laptop models proposed today (Thinkpad X240, HP EliteBook 820 G1 and G2) lack three mouse buttons). It is also unclear to me how good the keyboard on the HP EliteBooks are. I hope Lenovo have not messed up the keyboard, even if the quality and robustness in the X series have deteriorated since X41.

I wonder how I can find a sensible laptop when none of the options seem sensible to me? Are there better services around to search the set of available laptops for features? Please send me an email if you have suggestions.

Categories: FLOSS Project Planets

Enrico Zini: italian-fattura-elettronica

Thu, 2015-07-02 17:48
Billing an Italian public administration

Here's a simple guide for how I managed to bill one of my customers as is now mandated by law in Italy.

Create a new virtualbox machine

I would never do any of this to any system I would ever want to use for anything else, so it's virtual machine time.

  • I started virtualbox, created a new machine for Ubuntu 32bit, 8Gb disk, 4Gb RAM, and placed the .vdi image in an encrypted partition. The web services of Infocert's fattura-pa requires "Java (JRE) a 32bit di versione 1.6 o superiore".
  • I installed Ubuntu 12.04 on it: that is what dike declares to support.
  • I booted the VM, installed virtualbox-guest-utils, and de sure I also had virtualbox-guest-x11
  • I restarted the VM so that I could resize the virtualbox window and have Ubuntu resize itself as well. Now I could actually read popup error messages in full.
  • I changed the desktop background to something that gave me the idea that this is an untrusted machine where I need to be very careful of what I type. I went for bright red.
Install smart card software into it
  • apt-get install pcscd pcsc-tools opensc
  • In virtualbox, I went to Devices/USB devices and enabled the smart card reader in the virtual machine.
  • I ran pcsc_scan to see if it could see my smart card.
  • I ran Firefox, went to preferences, advanced, security devices, load. Module name is "CRS PKCS#11", module path is /usr/lib/opensc-pkcs11.so
  • I went to https://fattura-pa.infocamere.it/fpmi/service and I was able to log in. To log in, I had to type the PIN 4 times into popups that offered little explanations about what was going on, enjoying cold shivers because the smart card would lock itself at the 3rd failed attempt.
  • Congratulations to myself! I thought that all was set, but unfortunately, at this stage, I was not able to do anything else except log into the website.
Descent into darkness Set up things for fattura-pa
  • I got the PDF with the setup instructions from here. Get it too, for a reference, a laugh, and in case you do not believe the instructions below.
  • I went to https://www.firma.infocert.it/installazione/certificato.php, and saved the two certificates.
  • Firefox, preferences, advanced, show certificates, I imported both CA certificates, trusted for everything, all my base are belong to them.
  • apt-get install icedtea-plugin
  • I went to https://fattura-pa.infocamere.it/fpmi/service and tried to sign. I could not: I got an error about invalid UTF8 for something or other in Firefox's stdandard error. Firefox froze and had to be killed.
Set up things for signing locally with dike
  • I removed icedtea so that I could use the site without firefox crashing.
  • I installed DiKe For Ubuntu 12.04 32bit
  • I ran dikeutil to see if it could talk to my smart card
  • When signing with the website, I chose the manual signing options and downloaded the zip file with the xml to be signed.
  • I got a zip file, unzipped it.
  • I loaded the xml into dike.
  • I signed it with dike.
  • I got this error message: "nessun certificato di firma presente sul dispositivo di firma" and then this error message: "Impossibile recuperare il certificato dal dispositivo di firma". No luck.
Set up things for signing locally with ArubaSign
  • I went to https://www.pec.it/Download.aspx
  • I downloaded ArubaSign for Linux 32 bit.
  • Oh! People say that it only works with Oracle's version of Java.
  • sudo add-apt-repository ppa:webupd8team/java
  • apt-get update
  • apt-get install oracle-java7-installer
  • During the installation process I had to agree to also sell my soul to Oracle.
  • tar axf ArubaSign*.tar*
  • cd ArubaSing-*/apps/dist
  • java -jar ArubaSign.jar
  • I let it download its own updates. Another time I did not. It does not seem to matter: I get asked that question every time I start it anyway.
  • I enjoyed the fancy brushed metal theme, and had an interesting time navigating an interface where every label on every icon or input field was truncated.
  • I downloaded https://www.pec.it/documenti/Manuale_ArubaSign2_firma%20Remota_V03_02_07_2012.pdf to get screenshots of that interface with all the labels intact
  • I signed the xml that I got from the website. I got told that I needed to really view carefully what I was signing, because the signature would be legally binding
  • I enjoyed carefully reading a legally binding, raw XML file.
  • I told it to go ahead, and there was now a .p7m file ready for me. I rejoiced, as now I might, just might actually get paid for my work.
Try fattura-pa again

Maybe fattura-pa would work with Oracle's Java plugin?

  • I went to https://fattura-pa.infocamere.it/fpmi/service
  • I got asked to verify java at www.java.com. I did it.
  • I told FireFox to enable java.
  • Suddenly, and while I was still in java.com's tab, I got prompted about allowing Infocert's applet to run: I allowed it to run.
  • I also got prompted several times, still while the current tab was not even Infocert's tab, about running components that could compromise the security of my system. I allowed and unblocked all of them.
  • I entered my PIN.
  • Congratulations! Now I have two ways of generating legally binding signatures with government issued smart cards!
Aftermath

I shut down that virtual machine and I'm making sure I never run anything important on it. Except, of course, generating legally binding signatures as required by the Italian government.

What could possibly go wrong?

Categories: FLOSS Project Planets

Antonio Terceiro: Upgrades to Jessie, Ruby 2.2 transition, and chef update

Thu, 2015-07-02 16:26

Last month I started to track all the small Debian-related things that I do. My initial motivation was to be concious about how often I spend short periods of time working on Debian. Sometimes it’s during lunch breaks, weekends, first thing in the morning before regular work, after I am done for the day with regular work, or even during regular work, since I do have the chance of doing Debian work as part of my regular work occasionally.

Now that I have this information, I need to do something with it. So this is probably the first of monthly updates I will post about my Debian work. Hopefully it won’t be the last.

Upgrades to Jessie

I (finally) upgraded my two servers to Jessie. The first one, my home server, is a Utilite which is a quite nice ARM box. It is silent and consumes very little power. The only problem I had with it is that the vendor-provided kernel is too old, so I couldn’t upgrade udev, and therefore couldn’t switch to systemd. I had to force systemv for now, until I can manage to upgrade the kernel and configure uboot to properly boot the official Debian kernel.

On my VPS things are way better. I was able to upgrade nicely, and it is now running a stock Jessie system.

fixed https on ci.debian.net

pabs had let me know on IRC of an issue with the TLS certificate for ci.debian.net, which took me a few iterations to get right. It was missing the intermediate certificates, and is now fixed. You can now enjoy Debian CI under https .

Ruby 2.2 transition

I was able to start the Ruby 2.2 transition, which has the goal of switch to Ruby 2.2 on unstable. The first step was updating ruby-defaults adding support to build Ruby packgaes for both Ruby 2.1 and Ruby 2.2. This was followed by updates to gem2deb (0.18, 0.18.1, 0.18.2, and 0.18.3) and rubygems-integration . At this point, after a few rebuild requests only 50 out of 137 packages need to be looked at; some of them just use the default Ruby, so a rebuild once we switch the default will be enough to make it use Ruby 2.2, while others, specially Ruby libraries, will still need porting work or other fixes.

Updated the Chef stack

Bringing chef to the very latest upstream release into unstable was quite some work.

I had to update:

  • ruby-columnize (0.9.0-1)
  • ruby-mime-types (2.6.1-1)
  • ruby-mixlib-log 1.6.0-1
  • ruby-mixlib-shellout (2.1.0-1)
  • ruby-mixlib-cli (1.5.0-1)
  • ruby-mixlib-config (2.2.1-1)
  • ruby-mixlib-authentication (1.3.0-2)
  • ohai (8.4.0-1)
  • chef-zero (4.2.2-1)
  • ruby-specinfra (2.35.1-1)
  • ruby-serverspec (2.18.0-1)
  • chef (12.3.0-1)
  • ruby-highline (1.7.2-1)
  • ruby-safe-yaml (1.0.4-1)

In the middle I also had to package a new dependency, ruby-ffi-yajl, which was very quickly ACCEPTED thanks to the awesome work of the ftp-master team.

Random bits

  • Sponsored a upload of redir by Lucas Kanashiro
  • chake, a tool that I wrote for managing servers with chef but without a central chef server, got ACCEPTED into the official Debian archive.
  • vagrant-lxc , a vagrant plugin for using lxc as backend and lxc containters as development environments, was also ACCEPTED into unstable.
  • I got the deprecated ruby-rack1.4 package removed from Debian
Categories: FLOSS Project Planets

Christoph Berg: PostgreSQL 9.5 in Debian

Thu, 2015-07-02 14:03

Today saw the release of PostgreSQL 9.5 Alpha 1. Packages for all supported Debian and Ubuntu releases are available on apt.postgresql.org:

deb http://apt.postgresql.org/pub/repos/apt/ YOUR_RELEASE_HERE-pgdg main 9.5

The package is also waiting in NEW to be accepted for Debian experimental.

Being curious which PostgreSQL releases have been in use over time, I pulled some graphics from Debian's popularity contest data:

Before we included the PostgreSQL major version in the package name, "postgresql" contained the server, so that line represents the installation count of the pre-7.4 releases at the left end of the graph.

Interestingly, 7.4 reached its installation peak well past 8.1's. Does anyone have an idea why that happened?

Categories: FLOSS Project Planets

Simon Kainz: DUCK challenge at DebConf15

Thu, 2015-07-02 10:45
New features in DUCK Carnivore-* data

DUCK now uses carnivore-{names,email} tables from UDD, giving a nice list of packages grouped by Maintainer/Uploader names.

Domain grouping

A per-domain-listing is now also available here.

DUCK challenge at DebConf15

After announcing DUCK in mid-june 2012, the number of source packages with issues is still somewhat stable around 1700. After a recent update of the curl libs, i also managed to get rid of 200 false positives, caused by SSL-verification issues, as can be seen here.

To speed things up a bit and lower the number of broken links, i hereby propose the following challenge:

The first 99 persons who fix at least 1 broken URL and upload the fixed package before end of DebConf15 will get an awesome "200 OK" DUCK-branded lighter at DebConf15!

The challenge starts right now!

I will try hard to not forget anyone who fixes packages (note the s ;-), but if you feel missed out, please contact me at DC15.

Also, please remember that this is not a valid excuse to NMU packages ;-).

su

Categories: FLOSS Project Planets

Ritesh Raj Sarraf: Laptop Mode Tools 1.67

Thu, 2015-07-02 08:11

I am pleased to announce the release of Laptop Mode Tools, version 1.67.

This release has many important bug fixes, and everyone is recommended to upgrade. Of the many, one important fix is to, more reliably check for Device Mapper based devices, which is common these days with Crypt and LVM.

For the summary of changes to quote from git log:

1.67 - Thu Jul 2 17:05:07 IST 2015 * Relax minimum window size to accomodate low res screens * Fix variable name to comply with our "constants" assuptions * Get more aggressive in power saving for Intel HD Audio * Account Device Mapper devices * Add swsusp freeze support * Switch battery-level-polling default to True * Detect ethernet carrier, early and relibaly * changes the boolean setting *_ACTIVATE_SATA_POWER to a customizable *_SATA_POLICY, with backward-compatible defaults and documentation Thanks Yuir D'Elia

PS: On a side note, over the years, Linux's power savings functionality has improved a lot, all thanks to its use in the mobile worlds. At the same time, because of more companies shipping drivers depending on external firmware, stability has become less reliable. And to add to that, bare functionality of devices typically ask for disabling, you know what, LPM.

So, at the end, the result is the same.

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Categories: FLOSS Project Planets

Petter Reinholdtsen: MakerCon Nordic videos now available on Frikanalen

Thu, 2015-07-02 08:10

Last oktober I was involved on behalf of NUUG with recording the talks at MakerCon Nordic, a conference for the Maker movement. Since then it has been the plan to publish the recordings on Frikanalen, which finally happened the last few days. A few talks are missing because the speakers asked the organizers to not publish them, but most of the talks are available. The talks are being broadcasted on RiksTV channel 50 and using multicast on Uninett, as well as being available from the Frikanalen web site. The unedited recordings are available on Youtube too.

This is the list of talks available at the moment. Visit the Frikanalen video pages to view them.

  • Evolutionary algorithms as a design tool - from art to robotics (Kyrre Glette)
  • Make and break (Hans Gerhard Meier)
  • Making a one year school course for young makers (Olav Helland)
  • Innovation Inspiration - IPR Databases as a Source of Inspiration (Hege Langlo)
  • Making a toy for makers (Erik Torstensson)
  • How to make 3D printer electronics (Elias Bakken)
  • Hovering Clouds: Looking at online tool offerings for Product Design and 3D Printing (William Kempton)
  • Travelling maker stories (Øyvind Nydal Dahl)
  • Making the first Maker Faire in Sweden (Nils Olander)
  • Breaking the mold: Printing 1000’s of parts (Espen Sivertsen)
  • Ultimaker — and open source 3D printing (Erik de Bruijn)
  • Autodesk’s 3D Printing Platform: Sparking innovation (Hilde Sevens)
  • How Making is Changing the World – and How You Can Too! (Jennifer Turliuk)
  • Open-Source Adventuring: OpenROV, OpenExplorer and the Future of Connected Exploration (David Lang)
  • Making in Norway (Haakon Karlsen Jr., Graham Hayward and Jens Dyvik)
  • The Impact of the Maker Movement (Mike Senese)

Part of the reason this took so long was that the scripts NUUG had to prepare a recording for publication were five years old and no longer worked with the current video processing tools (command line argument changes). In addition, we needed better audio normalization, which sent me on a detour to package bs1770gain for Debian. Now this is in place and it became a lot easier to publish NUUG videos on Frikanalen.

Categories: FLOSS Project Planets

Michael Prokop: HAProxy with Debian/squeeze clients causing random “Hash Sum mismatch”

Thu, 2015-07-02 06:17

Update on 2015-07-02 22:15 UTC: as Petter Reinholdtsen noted in the comments:

Try adding /etc/apt/apt.conf.d/90squid with content like this:

Acquire::http::Pipeline-Depth 0;

It turn off the feature in apt confusing proxies.

” – this indeed avoids those “Hash Sum mismatch” failures with HAProxy as well. Thanks, Petter!

Many of you might know apt’s “Hash Sum mismatch” issue and there are plenty of bug reports about it (like #517874, #624122, #743298 + #762079).

Recently I saw the “Hash Sum mismatch” usually only when using “random” mirrors with e.g. httpredir.debian.org in apt’s sources.list, but with a static mirror such issues usually don’t exist anymore. A customer of mine has a Debian mirror and this issue wasn’t a problem there neither, until recently:

Since the mirror also includes packages provided to customers and the mirror needs to be available 24/7 we decided to provide another instance of the mirror and put those systems behind HAProxy (version 1.5.8-3 as present in Debian/jessie). The HAProxy setup worked fine and we didn’t notice any issues in our tests, until the daily Q/A builds randomly started to report failures:

Failed to fetch http://example.org/foobar_amd64.deb Hash Sum mismatch

When repeating the download there was no problem though. This problem only appeared about once every 15-20 minutes with random package files and it affected only Debian/squeeze clients (wheezy and jessie aren’t affected at all). The problem also didn’t appear when directly accessing the mirrors behind HAproxy. We tried plenty of different options for apt (Acquire::http::No-Cache=true, Acquire::http::No-Partial=true,…) and also played with some HAProxy configurations, nothing really helped. With apt’s “Debug::Acquire::http=True” we saw that there really was a checksum failure and HTTP status code 102 (‘Processing‘, or in terms of apt: ‘Waiting for headers‘) seems to be involved. The actual problem between apt on Debian/squeeze and HAProxy is still unknown to us though.

While digging deeper into this issue is on my todo list yet, I found a way to avoid those “Hash Sum mismatch” failures: switch from http to https in sources.list. As soon as https is used the problem doesn’t appear anymore. I’m documenting it here just in case anyone else should run into it.

Categories: FLOSS Project Planets

Steve Kemp: My new fitness challenge

Thu, 2015-07-02 04:18

So recently I posted on twitter about a sudden gain in strength:

I have conquered pull-ups! On Saturday night I could do 1.5. Today I could do 11! (Chinups were always easy.) #fitness

— Steve Kemp (@Stolen_Souls) June 15, 2015

To put that more into context I should give a few more details. In the past I've been using an assisted pull-up machine, which offers a counterweight to make such things easier.

When I started the exercise I assumed I couldn't do it for real, so I used the machine and set it on 150lb. Over a few weeks I got as far as being able to use it with only 80lb. (Which means I was lifting my entire body-weight minus 80lb. With the assisted-pullup machine smaller numbers are best!)

One evening I was walking to the cinema with my wife and told her I thought I'd be getting close to doing one real pull-up soon, which sounds a little silly, but I guess is pretty common for random men who are 40 as I almost am. As it happens there were some climbing equipment nearby so I said "Here see how close I am", and I proceeded to do 1.5 pullups. (The second one was bad, and didn't count, as I got 90% of the way "up".)

Having had that success I knew I could do "almost two", and I set a goal for the next gym visit: 3 x 3-pullups. I did that. Then I did two more for fun on the way out (couldn't quite manage a complete set.)

So that's the story of how I went from doing 1.5 pullus to doing 11 in less than a week. These days I can easily do 3x3, but struggle with more. It'll come, slowly.

So pull-up vs. chin-up? This just relates to which way you place your hands: palm facing you (chin-up) and palm way from you (pull-up).

Some technical details here but chinups are easier, and more bicep-centric.

Anyway too much writing. My next challenge is the one-armed pushup. However long it takes, and I think it will take a while, that's what I'm working toward.

Categories: FLOSS Project Planets

Norbert Preining: An amusing lintian error — Lenna

Thu, 2015-07-02 03:28

Well, there we are, trying to build another round of TeX Live packages for Debian, just to realize that the lintian error that should have been downgraded to warning (or removed) is still around, due to doubts about the license. Ok. Well, anyway, but what I found is even more funny:

E: texlive-extra source: license-problem-non-free-img-lenna texmf-dist/doc/latex/reflectgraphics/lenna.jpg

which is about one of the most used images in images processing courses, Lenna:


Without comments, I just quote the lintian error … it is a whole lot of fun to read.

Ref: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lenna, https://www.debian.org/vote/2012/vote_002, #771191
Info: The given source file is cropped from playboy centerfold.

This image is a picture of Lena Söderberg, shot by photographer Dwight Hooker, cropped from the centerfold of the November 1972 issue of Playboy magazine.

According to Hutchison, Jamie (May–June 2001). “Culture, Communication, and an Information Age Madonna” (PDF). IEEE Professional Communication Society Newsletter 45 (3). (page 5 second column second paragraph), this image is distributable but not free.

Moreover, Lenna photo has been pointed to as an example of sexism in the sciences, reinforcing gender stereotypes.

Please use well known and free test image.

Please also submit md5sum, sha1sum, and sha256 of this file as a bug report for lintian.

How fortunate our generation is that we don’t have anything else to care about …

Anyway, back to rebuilding orig.tars, source packages, and binary packages!

Categories: FLOSS Project Planets

Lars Wirzenius: Obnam 1.10 released (backup software)

Thu, 2015-07-02 01:10

I have just released version 1.10 of Obnam, my backup program. See the website at http://obnam.org for details on what it does. The new version is available from git (see http://git.liw.fi) and as Debian packages from http://code.liw.fi/debian, and uploaded to Debian, hopefully soon in unstable.

The NEWS file extract below gives the highlights of what's new in this version.

Version 1.10, released 2015-07-01

Major bug fixes:

  • Lars Wirzenius fixed the obnam backup command to lock the whole repository, the same way as obnam forget does, when it removes checkpoint generations. This means that during checkpoint removal, no other client can make a backup, which is unfortunate. To avoid that, set leave-checkpoints = yes in the configuration. That will prevent obnam backup from removing checkpoints.

Minor new features:

  • Lars Wirzenius added the obnam list-formats command to list all repository formats.

  • The default value for the upload-queue-size setting is now 1024, chosen based on some benchmarking made by Lars Wirzenius to balance speed and memory use.

  • An EXPERIMENTAL new repository format, green-albatross, as been introduced. It is not ready for actual use, and is only added so that its code doesn't diverge far from the main line of development.

  • Teemu Hukkanen reported that the Synology NAS device returns EACCES instead of ENOENT when user tries to remove a non-existent file. Obnam now copes with either error code.

Minor fixes:

  • python setup.py build no longer formats the manual page into plain text. This is now done in python setup.py docs instead. The latter is an optional build step, and probably only works on Debian.

  • obnam restore --to=DIR now requires that the directory DIR either doesn't exist, or it is empty when the restore starts. This is to prevent users from restore on top of a running system.

Categories: FLOSS Project Planets