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James Duncan

Fri, 2019-04-12 15:15

View from the twenty-second floor of the Sheraton Hotel in Toronto

Traveling west means waking up early and enjoying sunrises, as long as there’s a good view and you have time to enjoy it. I wanted to watch this sunrise unfold and watch people start their day, but I had to start my own day, get a move on, and go to the venue for Create in Toronto.

Categories: FLOSS Project Planets

Claus Ibsen: Long 2h Apache Camel video (sorry it's in danish)

Fri, 2019-04-12 04:14
A couple of days ago I was back in Copenhagen, at the capital region IT division for health care, where my Apache Camel journey started in 2008. So it was great being back at that magical place ;)


The event was hosted by Javagruppen and they had video equipment so they streamed the event live on youtube.

The agenda of my 2 hour session was:

  • What is Apache Camel?
  • Apache Camel v3
  • Apache Camel K
  • Knative & Camel
  • Quarkus & Camel

The main topic of the session was the new Apache Camel K project, but I gave a good extended coverage of what's coming in the upcoming Apache Camel v3.
For anyone curious a bit what is coming in Apache Camel v3, then you can take a look at the slides as they are in english.

The slides of the talk is here:



... and the video is online at youtube (danish):




Categories: FLOSS Project Planets

Bryan Pendleton: The (un)happy Medium

Thu, 2019-04-11 23:16

Generally speaking, I feel like I ought to like Medium

So why is it that I seem to be actively avoiding every medium link that shows up in my various feeds, nowadays.

I can't clearly express the unease I have about the platform.

What do you think? Is Medium to be avoided, embraced, or is it just "meh"?

Categories: FLOSS Project Planets

Justin Mason: Links for 2019-04-11

Thu, 2019-04-11 19:58
  • Amazon workers call for zero carbon emissions and cancellation of an AWS fossil-fuel friendly program

    nice one.

    Then the activists saw an article in Gizmodo, a technology news site, that outlined how Amazon’s cloud computing division was building special offerings for oil and gas companies. On its website, Amazon says its customers include BP and Royal Dutch Shell, and its products can “find oil faster,” “recover more oil” and “reduce the cost per barrel.” In a second meeting with Amazon, the workers raised the oil industry connections with the company’s sustainability team; its members did not seem to be aware of the business, according to several employees at the meeting. “That really showed us Amazon is not taking climate change seriously if the highest levels of the sustainability team are not even aware that we have an oil and gas business,” said Ms. Cunningham, who was at the meeting.

    (tags: amazon aws fossil-fuels zero-carbon emissions climate-change sustainability)

  • Using 6 Page and 2 Page Documents To Make Organizational Decisions

    Ian Nowland has written up the Amazon 6-pager strategy:

    A challenge of organizations is the aggregation of local information to a point where a globally optimal decision can be made in a way all stakeholders have seen their feedback heard and so can “disagree and commit” on the result. This document describes the “6 pager” and “2 pager” document and review meeting process, as a mechanism to address this challenge, as practiced by the document’s author in his time in the EC2 team at Amazon, and then at Two Sigma. […] The major variant I have also seen is 2 pages with 30 minute review; when the decision is smaller in terms of stakeholders, options or impact. That being said, there is nothing magical about 2 pages, i.e., a 3 page document is fine, it just should be expected to take more than 30 minutes to review.

    (tags: amazon business decisions teams documents planning)

  • Europol Tells Internet Archive That Much Of Its Site Is ‘Terrorist Content’ | Techdirt

    ‘The Internet Archive has a few staff members that process takedown notices from law enforcement who operate in the Pacific time zone. Most of the falsely identified URLs mentioned here (including the report from the French government) were sent to us in the middle of the night – between midnight and 3am Pacific – and all of the reports were sent outside of the business hours of the Internet Archive. The one-hour requirement essentially means that we would need to take reported URLs down automatically and do our best to review them after the fact. It would be bad enough if the mistaken URLs in these examples were for a set of relatively obscure items on our site, but the EU IRU’s lists include some of the most visited pages on archive.org and materials that obviously have high scholarly and research value.’

    (tags: eu europol policing france archive.org archival web freedom censorship fail)

Categories: FLOSS Project Planets

Claus Ibsen: Short Apache Camel K video

Thu, 2019-04-11 06:27
You may have seen the work we are doing in the Apache Camel community around Camel K.
Nicola introduced Camel K on his blog a half year ago, with the words
Just few months ago, we were discussing about a new project that we could start as part of Apache Camel. A project with the potential to change the way people deal with integration. That project is now here and it’s called “Apache Camel K”.The Apache Camel K is in active development and its progressing nicely. Yesterday I gave a talk at the KMD Steam conference in Copenhagen, Denmark about Serverless Integration with Knative and Camel K on Kubernetes. As the talk was only 30 minutes I decided not to do any live demos and quickly recorded a 45 second short video of a quick Camel K demo.


In the top left corner you have a Camel route in a single Sample.java source file. On the top right corner we have an openshift web console, as I am running a local minishift cluster (Camel K also runs nicely on vanilla Kubernetes, but their web console is not as great as the one from openshift).
In the bottom we have the terminal where I run the Camel K integration with the Camel K CLI tool and the output of the integration is logged in the console. Notice how quickly the rolling upgrade is when I edit and save the Java source code.


Categories: FLOSS Project Planets

Justin Mason: Links for 2019-04-10

Wed, 2019-04-10 19:58
  • At wit’s end with my preschooler : Parenting

    This /r/parenting thread has some good advice on dealing with kids’ meltdowns. I wish I had this a few years ago

    (tags: parenting kids tantrums anger reddit advice)

  • Spark memory tuning on EMR

    ‘Best practices for successfully managing memory for Apache Spark applications on Amazon EMR’, on the AWS Big Data blog. ‘In this blog post, I detailed the possible out-of-memory errors, their causes, and a list of best practices to prevent these errors when submitting a Spark application on Amazon EMR. My colleagues and I formed these best practices after thorough research and understanding of various Spark configuration properties and testing multiple Spark applications. These best practices apply to most of out-of-memory scenarios, though there might be some rare scenarios where they don’t apply. However, we believe that this blog post provides all the details needed so you can tweak parameters and successfully run a Spark application.’

    (tags: spark emr aws tuning memory ooms java)

Categories: FLOSS Project Planets

James Duncan

Wed, 2019-04-10 16:00

In flight over the Netherlands

Categories: FLOSS Project Planets

James Duncan

Wed, 2019-04-10 15:00

The Butcher’s Daughter in NYC

Categories: FLOSS Project Planets

James Duncan

Wed, 2019-04-10 13:00

With the completion of our event in New York yesterday, the Create tour is well and truly underway.

We’ve got 11 more stops planned before the end of June around the world, but it feels really good to get this first one done, to connect with the attendees in New York, and to get their feedback on how we did. We’ll be taking that feedback and rolling it in, adjusting as we go. Iteration is the key, right?

Next stop: tomorrow in Toronto.

Categories: FLOSS Project Planets

Stefan Bodewig: XMLUnit.NET 2.7.0-beta-01 Released

Wed, 2019-04-10 05:05

This is the very first release of XMLUnit.NET that supports .NET Standard 2.0 in addition to the traditional .NET Framework 3.5. Only the build process and the nuget packages have changed, there is no other difference between this release and XMLUnit.NET 2.6.0. If you don't need support for .NET Standard there is no reason to upgrade.

This release has been labeled beta as the packaging needs more thorough testing by the community.

Many thanks to @shatl who performed most of the heavy lifting which has made this release possible.

Categories: FLOSS Project Planets

Justin Mason: Links for 2019-04-09

Tue, 2019-04-09 19:58
Categories: FLOSS Project Planets

Justin Mason: Links for 2019-04-08

Mon, 2019-04-08 19:58
Categories: FLOSS Project Planets

Ortwin Glück: [Code] On Gentoo sshd crashes after gcc update

Mon, 2019-04-08 02:37
I have updated from gcc-7.3 to gcc-8.2. On most of my Gentoo boxes this lead to continous crashing of sshd. The crashes don't actually look like crashes (not sefault or anything) but rather look like normal process exit or sigkill. Sshd would crash at connection attempts and also when I run grub-install (which is really freaking weird). The problem persists across reboots.

After I rebuilt ssh openssl and pam with the new compiler the problem went away: emerge -1av openssh openssl pam
Categories: FLOSS Project Planets

Bryan Pendleton: We are stardust, we are golden; we are billion year old carbon

Sun, 2019-04-07 22:25

Every year, as we approach Earth Day, it's good to remember, and good to consider, this magical aggregate of dust upon which we all survive:

  • This Woman Paddled 730 miles up the Green River - to save our water systems. I’m paddling the length of the river, to try and understand that risk, my own and other people’s, and to see, from river level, what we could stand to lose if we don’t change how we use and allocate water. “Throughout the whole last century, if you needed more water it always worked out somehow, but it doesn’t work when you get to the point where you’re storing every last drop,” Doug Kenney, Director of the Western Water Policy program at the University of Colorado, tells me before I set out on the river. “You have to talk people through it, and explain that for every new reservoir you try and fill you’re putting more stress on the other parts of the system. Things are changing and we should behave in a way that limits our risk.”

    (See also: Heather Hansman: The Dam Problem in the West)

  • Letter From a Drowned CanyonOn a map, Glen Canyon before its submersion looks like a centipede: a 200-mile-long central canyon bending and twisting with a host of little canyons like legs on either side. Those side canyons were sometimes hundreds of feet deep; some were so cramped you could touch both walls with your outstretched hands; some had year-round running water in them or potholes that explorers had to swim across. Sometimes in the cool shade of side-canyon ledges and crevices, ferns and other moisture-loving plants made hanging gardens. Even the names of these places are beautiful: Forbidding Canyon, Face Canyon, Dove Canyon, Red Canyon, Twilight Canyon, Balanced Rock Canyon, Ribbon Canyon. Like Dungeon Canyon, they are now mostly underwater.

    When the Sierra Club pronounced Glen Canyon dead in 1963, the organization’s leaders expected it to stay dead under Lake Powell. But this old world is re-emerging, and its fate is being debated again. The future we foresee is often not the one we get, and Lake Powell is shriveling, thanks to more water consumption and less water supply than anyone anticipated. Beneath it lies not just canyons but spires, crests, labyrinths of sandstone, Anasazi ruins, petroglyphs, and burial sites, an intricate complexity hidden by water, depth lost in surface. The uninvited guest, the unanticipated disaster, reducing rainfall and snowmelt and increasing drought and evaporation in the Southwest, is climate change.

  • How the Flint River got so toxicWhy did Flint’s river pose so many problems? Before processing, the water itself is polluted from four sources: natural biological waste; treated industrial and human waste; untreated waste intentionally or accidentally dumped into the river; and contaminants washed into the river by rain or snow. The river is also warmer than Lake Huron, and its flow is less constant, particularly in the summer. All of this raises levels of bacteria and organic matter and introduces a wide range of other potential contaminants, whether natural or human-made.

    In fact, while the Flint River had been improving thanks to the new regulations, the departure of heavy industry, and local cleanup efforts, it had long been known as an exceptionally polluted river. Until very recently, it had been repeatedly ruled out as a primary source for the city’s drinking water. It is hard to imagine why anyone familiar with the river’s history would ever decide to use it even as a temporary water source. But they did.

  • Looking Again at the Chernobyl DisasterA neglected step caused the reactor’s power to plunge, and frantic attempts to revive it created an unexpected power surge. Poorly trained operators panicked. An explosion of hydrogen and oxygen sent Elena into the air “like a flipped coin” and destroyed the reactor. Operators vainly tried to stop a meltdown by planning to shove control rods in by hand. Escaping radiation shot a pillar of blue-white phosphorescent light into the air.

    The explosion occurs less than 100 pages into this 366-page book (plus more than 100 pages of notes, glossary, cast of characters and explanation of radiation units). But what follows is equally gripping. Radio-controlled repair bulldozers became stuck in the rubble. Exposure to radiation made voices grow high and squeaky. A dying man whispered to his nurse to step back because he was too radioactive. A workman’s radioactive shoe was the first sign in Sweden of a nuclear accident 1,000 miles upwind. Soviet bigwigs entered the area with high-tech dosimeters they didn’t know how to turn on. Investigations blamed the accident on six tweakers, portrayed them as “hooligans” and convicted them.

Categories: FLOSS Project Planets

Nick Kew: Passion

Sun, 2019-04-07 07:00

Time to mention our next concert: one of the greatest of all Easter works.  Bach’s St Matthew Passion, at the Guildhall, Plymouth, a week today (Sunday April 14th).

This work should need no introduction, and I have no hesitation recommending it to readers within evening-out distance of Plymouth.  I’m looking forward to it.

Just one downside.  As with our performance of the St John’s Passion three years ago, this is a “new” Novello translation.  I think if I’d come to these (translations) in reverse order my criticisms might have been a little different, but the underlying point remains: these are about money.  A rentier publisher contemptuously saying screw the art.  And I can now answer the question I posed then: with ISIS no longer having the earthly power to destroy more great heritage, Novello score a clear victory in the cultural vandalism stakes.

Categories: FLOSS Project Planets

Bryan Pendleton: A sense of fullness

Sat, 2019-04-06 13:41

Here's one take: Trump, following border trip, says country is full: 'We can't do it anymore'

President Trump, fresh off a trip to the U.S. southern border, doubled-down on his message that “the country is full”

...

“The country is full. We have ... our system is full. We can't do it anymore,” Trump said

...

The president shared the same message earlier in the day at a roundtable with law enforcement and immigration officials, telling any potential migrants to “turn around” because the U.S. “can’t take you anymore.”

And here's another: Heartland Visas Report

  • U.S. population growth has fallen to 80-year lows. The country now adds approximately 900,000 fewer people each year than it did in the early 2000s.
  • The last decade marks the first time in the past century that the United States has experienced low population growth and low prime working age growth on a sustained basis at the same time.
  • Uneven population growth is leaving more places behind. 86% of counties now grow more slowly than the nation as a whole, up from 64% in the 1990s.
  • In total, 61 million Americans live in counties with stagnant or shrinking populations and 38 million live in the 41% of U.S. counties experiencing rates of demographic decline similar to Japan’s.
  • 80% of U.S. counties, home to 149 million Americans, lost prime working age adults from 2007 to 2017, and 65% will again over the next decade.
  • By 2037, two-thirds of U.S. counties will contain fewer prime working age adults than they did in 1997, even though the country will add 24.1 million prime working age adults and 98.8 million people in total over that same period.
  • Population decline affects communities in every state. Half of U.S. states lost prime working age adults from 2007-2017. 43% of counties in the average state lost population in that same time period, and 76% lost prime working age adults.
  • Shrinking places are also aging the most rapidly. By 2027, 26% of the population in the fastest shrinking counties will be 65 and older compared to 20% nationwide.
  • Population loss is hitting many places with already weak socioeconomic foundations. The share of the adult population with at least a bachelor’s degree in the bottom decile of population loss is half that in the top decile of population growth. Educational attainment in the fastest shrinking counties is on average equivalent to that of Mexico today or the United States in 1978.
  • Population loss itself perpetuates economic decline. Its deleterious effects on housing markets, local government finances, productivity, and dynamism make it harder for communities to bounce back. For example, this analysis found that a 1 percentage point decline in a county’s population growth rate is associated with a 2-3 percentage point decline in its startup rate over the past decade.

Happily for me, I live in one of those areas where immigrants are welcomed; nearly everyone that I spend my waking hours with is either an immigrant or a child of an immigrant, and my part of the country is experiencing the most breathtaking growth, both cultural growth and economic growth, since the pre-Civil-War "Gold Rush" years of 1849-1850.

But I understand that other areas of the country are different.

Categories: FLOSS Project Planets

Justin Mason: Links for 2019-04-05

Fri, 2019-04-05 19:58
  • _Screens, Teens, and Psychological Well-Being: Evidence From Three Time-Use-Diary Studies_ – Amy Orben, Andrew K. Przybylski, 2019

    Paper from Amy Orben, Andrew K. Przybylski, of the Department of Experimental Psychology, University of Oxford, and the Oxford Internet Institute, University of Oxford:

    The notion that digital-screen engagement decreases adolescent well-being has become a recurring feature in public, political, and scientific conversation. The current level of psychological evidence, however, is far removed from the certainty voiced by many commentators. There is little clear-cut evidence that screen time decreases adolescent well-being, and most psychological results are based on single-country, exploratory studies that rely on inaccurate but popular self-report measures of digital-screen engagement. In this study, which encompassed three nationally representative large-scale data sets from Ireland, the United States, and the United Kingdom (N = 17,247 after data exclusions) and included time-use-diary measures of digital-screen engagement, we used both exploratory and confirmatory study designs to introduce methodological and analytical improvements to a growing psychological research area. We found little evidence for substantial negative associations between digital-screen engagement — measured throughout the day or particularly before bedtime — and adolescent well-being.

    (tags: screens screen-time teens mental-health psychology papers research)

Categories: FLOSS Project Planets

James Duncan

Fri, 2019-04-05 11:20

The reported discrimination and sexual harrassment behavior at Microsoft is unacceptable, needs to be accounted for, and made right.

Categories: FLOSS Project Planets

Colm O hEigeartaigh: Performance gain for web service requests in Apache CXF

Fri, 2019-04-05 07:52
In this post I want to talk about a recent performance gain for JAX-WS web service requests I made in Apache CXF. It was prompted by a mail to the CXF users list. The scenario was for a JAX-WS web service where certain requests are secured using WS-SecurityPolicy, and other requests are not. The problem was that the user observed that the security interceptors were always invoked in CXF, even for the requests that had no security applied to the message, and that this resulted in a noticeable performance penalty for large requests.

The reason for the performance penalty is that CXF needs to convert the request into a Document Object Model to apply WS-Security (note there is also a streaming WS-Security implementation available, but the performance is roughly similar). CXF needs to perform this conversion as it requires access to the full Document to perform XML Signature verification, etc. on the request. So even for the insecure request, it would apply CXF's SAAJInInterceptor. Then it would iterate through the security headers of the request, find that there was none present, and skip security processing.

However when thinking about this problem, I realised that before invoking the SAAJInInterceptor, we could check to see whether a security header is actually present in the request (and whether it matches the configured "actor" if one is configured). CXF makes the message headers available in DOM form, but not the SOAP Body (unless SAAJInInterceptor is called). If no matching security header is available, then we can skip security processing, and instead just perform WS-SecurityPolicy assertion using a set of empty results.

This idea is implemented in CXF for the 3.3.2 release via the task CXF-8010. To test what happens, I added a test-case to github here. This creates a war file with a service with two operations, one that is not secured, and one that has a WS-SecurityPolicy asymmetric binding applied to the operations. Both operations contain two parameters, an integer and a String description.

To test it, I added a JMeter test-case here. It uses 10 threads to call the insecure operation 30,000 times. The description String in each request contains the URL encoded version of the WS-Security specification to test what happens with a somewhat large request.

Here are the results using CXF 3.3.1:
and here are the results using the CXF 3.3.2-SNAPSHOT code with the fix for CXF-8010 applied:
Using CXF 3.3.1 the throughput is 1604.25 requests per second, whereas with CXF 3.3.2 the throughput is 1795.26 requests per second, a gain of roughly 9%. For a more complex SOAP Body I would expect the gain to be a lot greater.
Categories: FLOSS Project Planets

James Duncan

Thu, 2019-04-04 09:45

Seen randomly somewhere in Berlin.

Categories: FLOSS Project Planets

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