FLOSS Project Planets

Bryan Pendleton: Ireland Day Two: Dingle

Planet Apache - Sun, 2014-08-31 11:54

For some reason, I am awake early. We enjoy the hotel's breakfast buffet, but soon I am ready to leave.

Just down the road is Adare's Augustinian Abbey, which dates back to the 13th century but is now the parish Anglican church. The deacon is there, and tells us that, this spring, storms struck the area. There was a bad day: trees fell down, the Abbey's roof was damaged. He has opened the church and we visit briefly, pay our respects, and move on.

We have decided to avoid Tralee. The Rose of Tralee Festival is underway, and even though it would be fun to attend, we are more interested in visiting Dingle.

When we were preparing to visit Ireland, we spoke to many people. Person after person told us to visit Dingle. After a while, I lost count; still, it was a nearly universal suggestion. Because of our itinerary, this is our only chance to see Dingle, so today it must be, and today it will be.

We drive out of County Clare and into County Kerry, stopping briefly at the overlook above Castleisland to take in the marvelous view.

We strike west, out on to the peninsula, and stop for a walk on Inch Beach. The wind is howling; dogs are barking; children are playing, surfers are riding the waves. It is a special place.

On we go, and finally we arrive in Dingle, which is just as delightful as everyone promised it would be. A beautiful harbor, fun shops, and a great ice cream store with locally-made ice cream: "carmelized brown bread" is the flavor we choose.

We buy a bit of this and that. Today is the annual Dingle Regatta; youths are racing boats on the harbor.

Time is passing; we leave Dingle around 2:30 PM and drive to Killarney by way of Killorglin and the Ring of Kerry. Killorglin, of course, is the home of the famous Puck Fair, but we are one week too late.

Along the road, we have been noticing a large gray bird with black wings and a black head. Once we get some Internet service, we do a bit of research; it turns out that these are Hooded Crows, common to this area but completely new to us.

Somewhere between Killorglin and Killarney we pass Fossa and Aghadoe, but I am unaware and we just zoom on by. I'm not sure why my guide books didn't alert me more to Aghadoe, as I think I would have really enjoyed stopping there.

By 3:15 or so we are in Killarney. It is time to get out of the car, so we park in the lot at St Mary's Cathedral, which is truly a magnificent church, and we spend some time there. We walk into downtown Killarney and tour the shops; it is a fun place to while away the hours.

I stop into the local pub for a moment, my attention attracted by the game on TV. It is Gaelic Football, a most unique game, played only here in Southwest Ireland. It turns out that we drove right past the GAA field in Fossa just before we entered Killarney; I noticed that there were players on the field, but otherwise had no idea. The match on TV is Tipperary vs Cork, an important and hotly-contested battle, and we watch for a while.

The drive from Killarney to Sneem is extremely dramatic, past lakes and mountains, winding along the cliffside, often only a single lane road, with massive tour buses racing along in the opposite direction. Eventually, we reach Sneem, and Parknasilla Resort, site of our anniversary celebratin, and an oasis of calm and beauty and a destination well worth the trip.

As you can tell by the view from our room!

Categories: FLOSS Project Planets

Thorsten Alteholz: My Debian activities in August 2014

Planet Debian - Sun, 2014-08-31 11:42

FTP assistant

By pure chance I was able to accept 237 packages, the same number as last month. 33 times I contacted the maintainer to ask a question about a package and 55 times I had to reject a package. The reject number increased a bit as I also worked on packages that already got a note but had not been fully processed. In contrast I only filed three serious bugs this month.

Currently there are about 200 packages still waiting in the NEW queue As the freeze for Jessie comes closer every day, I wonder whether all of them can be processed in time. So I don’t mind if every maintainer checks the package again and maybe uploads an improved version that can be processed faster.

Squeeze LTS

This was my second month that I did some work for the Squeeze LTS initiative, started by Raphael Hertzog at Freexian

All in all I got assigned a workload of 16.5h for August. I spent these hours to upload new versions of

  • [DLA 32-1] nspr security update
  • [DLA 34-1] libapache-mod-security security update
  • [DLA 36-1] polarssl security update
  • [DLA 37-1] krb5 security update
  • [DLA 39-1] gpgme1.0 security update
  • [DLA 41-1] python-imaging security update

As last month I prepared these uploads on the basis of the corresponding DSAs for Wheezy. For these packages backporting the Wheezy patches to Squeeze was rather easy.

I also had a look at python-django and eglibc. Although the python-django patches apply now, the package fails some tests and these issues need some further investigation. In case of eglibc, my small pbuilder didn’t have enough resources and trying to build the package resulted in a full disk after more than three hours of work.

For PHP5 Ondřej Surý (the real maintainer) suggested to use point releases of upstream instead of applying only patches. I am curious about how much effort is needed for this approach. Stay tuned, next month you will be told more details!

Anyway, this is still a lot of fun and I hope I can finish python-django, eglibc and php5 in September.

Other packages

This month my meep packages plus mpb have been part of a small hdf5 transition. All five packages needed a small patch and a new upload. As the patch was already provided by Gilles Filippini, this was done rather quickly.

Support

If you would like to support my Debian work you could either be part of the Freexian initiative (see above) or consider to send some bitcoins to 1JHnNpbgzxkoNexeXsTUGS6qUp5P88vHej. Contact me at donation@alteholz.eu if you prefer another way to donate. Every kind of support is most appreciated.

Categories: FLOSS Project Planets

Ritesh Raj Sarraf: apt-offline 1.4

Planet Debian - Sun, 2014-08-31 11:41

apt-offline 1.4 has been released [1]. This is a minor bug fix release. In fact, one feature, offline bug reports (--bug-reports),  has been dropped for now.

The Debian BTS interface seems to have changed over time and the older debianbts.py module (that used the CGI interface) does not seem to work anymore. The current debbugs.py module seems to have switched to the SOAP interface.

There are a lot of changes going on personally, I just haven't had the time to spend. If anyone would like to help, please reach out to me. We need to use the new debbugs.py module. And it should be cross-platform.

Also, thanks to Hans-Christoph Steiner for providing the bash completion script.

[1] https://alioth.debian.org/projects/apt-offline/

AddThis:  Categories: Keywords: 
Categories: FLOSS Project Planets

MariqueCalcus: Drupal 8 in action

Planet Drupal - Sun, 2014-08-31 10:05

Drupal 8, Plugins, Guzzle, CMI, Caching... If those buzzwords trigger your interest, you should keep reading this article. We will cover those topics as we are building one of our first Drupal 8 modules. Recently one of our clients requested a solution to integrate a custom feed called IBP Catalog. The IBP Catalog is a filterable XML feed, which enable to easily collect web component like banners, documents or even audio files. Those components are selected by the broker through a dedicated website.

Read More...
Categories: FLOSS Project Planets

Russell Coker: Links August 2014

Planet Debian - Sun, 2014-08-31 08:55

Matt Palmer wrote a good overview of DNSSEC [1].

Sociological Images has an interesting article making the case for phasing out the US $0.01 coin [2]. The Australian $0.01 and $0.02 coins were worth much more when they were phased out.

Multiplicity is a board game that’s designed to address some of the failings of SimCity type games [3]. I haven’t played it yet but the page describing it is interesting.

Carlos Buento’s article about the Mirrortocracy has some interesting insights into the flawed hiring culture of Silicon Valley [4].

Adam Bryant wrote an interesting article for NY Times about Google’s experiments with big data and hiring [5]. Among other things it seems that grades and test results have no correlation with job performance.

Jennifer Chesters from the University of Canberra wrote an insightful article about the results of Australian private schools [6]. Her research indicates that kids who go to private schools are more likely to complete year 12 and university but they don’t end up earning more.

Kiwix is an offline Wikipedia reader for Android, needs 9.5G of storage space for the database [7].

Melanie Poole wrote an informative article for Mamamia about the evil World Congress of Families and their connections to the Australian government [8].

The BBC has a great interactive web site about how big space is [9].

The Raspberry Pi Spy has an interesting article about automating Minecraft with Python [10].

Wired has an interesting article about the Bittorrent Sync platform for distributing encrypted data [11]. It’s apparently like Dropbox but encrypted and decentralised. Also it supports applications on top of it which can offer social networking functions among other things.

ABC news has an interesting article about the failure to diagnose girls with Autism [12].

The AbbottsLies.com.au site catalogs the lies of Tony Abbott [13]. There’s a lot of work in keeping up with that.

Racialicious.com has an interesting article about “Moff’s Law” about discussion of media in which someone says “why do you have to analyze it” [14].

Paul Rosenberg wrote an insightful article about conservative racism in the US, it’s a must-read [15].

Salon has an interesting and amusing article about a photography project where 100 people were tased by their loved ones [16]. Watch the videos.

Related posts:

  1. Links August 2013 Mark Cuban wrote an interesting article titled “What Business is...
  2. Links February 2014 The Economist has an interesting and informative article about the...
  3. Links July 2014 Dave Johnson wrote an interesting article for Salon about companies...
Categories: FLOSS Project Planets

Doug Vann: Drupal is a community AND there happens to be a piece of software by the same name

Planet Drupal - Sun, 2014-08-31 07:09

This is part one in a series of blog posts about the Drupal Community. There is NO SHORTAGE of posts on this topic, but I wanted to take the time to tell my story of how I got here and what the Drupal community means to me.

If you have ever attended one of my private or public trainings then chances are good that you have heard me utter the phrase that titles this blog post. You can also hear me saying this on a recent Podcast I did with the good folks at LightSky.com: http://www.lightsky.com/podcasts/drupal-community

Here is that quote again in longer form:

“Drupal is a community and there happens to be a piece of software by the exact same name, and that can be confusing for some.”

If you read that statement slow enough, or maybe a few times, I believe you will agree that this is a VERY loaded statement, a provocative one even. How does it make you feel when you read it? Do you instantly agree? Do you instantly disagree? Do you wonder if it is hyperbole or sensationalism at some level? I think all these reactions, and more, are well within the realm of expected, and acceptable, responses.

You see, my early exposure to “Drupal” started with a rather humongous dose of the Drupal Community. Therefore, it stands to reason that I know it well, love it dearly, and engage and describe it as often as I do. But it wasn’t just my early exposures that set me on a path of life long Drupal Community advocacy. It was the opportunities for continued exposures that were afforded to me by the very members of the community. It fed me, equipped me, and empowered me which, in turn, motivated me to energetically continue on in my role as an active Drupal Community member.

How it started:
For the LONGER version of this story, go listen to my 2009 DrupalEasy Podcast Interview.
Suffice to say that I discovered Drupal in December of 2007 and after becoming convinced that Drupal ROCKED I discovered that there was a training in Portland Oregon. This outfit with a real funny name was doing a 5 day training on module development for Drupal 5. What was that funny named company? Well, it was Lullabot, of course! :-) There I met MANY of the people who I count as good friends, partners, and colleagues to this day.
Let me keep this simple with a visual timeline of just how much Drupal Community interaction I had right out of the gate:

  • 2007
    • December            | Discover Drupal
  • 2008
    • Jan, Portland        | 5 days of Drupal5 Module Development Training with Lullabot & 2 dozen other [soon to be] friends.
    • Jan, Indianapolis   | I start the local Indy Drupal Users Group. Why? Because in Portland, Addi Berry told me to!
    • Feb, Los Angeles   | 5 days of Drupal5 Theme Development Training with Lullabot & some of my new friends from Portland PLUS some brand new friends.
    • Mar, Boston          | 4 days at DrupalCon with 850 Drupalers, so many of which I already knew from the 2 Lullabot classes
    • May, Minneapolis  | 5 days of Drupal6 Module/Theming training AGAIN with Lullabot & many familiar faces & new ones.
    • June, Toronto       | 5 days of Drupal6 Intensive Training AGAIN with Lullabot & many familiar faces & new ones.
    • July, Chicago        | 2 days helping to man the Drupal booth at HostingCon. Kieran Lal had put out a request for people to take shifts. I showed up and never left the booth. I was an animal doing everything I could to educate ppl on how awesome I thought Drupal was. I COULD NOT [would not?] shut up. I impressed the local Chicago Users Group members and they asked me if I would come speak at their first ever DrupalCamp Chicago. I AGREED! [Still didn’t understand what a DrupalCamp was!?!?!]
    • Oct, Chicago         | DrupalCamp Chicago is my 1st ever DrupalCamp! I wound up delivering over 8 sessions and leading a couple BoFs as I discovered my new title, King Of The N00bs!
    • Nov, Indianapolis  | I become aware of an event called IndyBANG [Indy Business & Arts Networking Get-together] I pay for booth space, print up a huge banner, and enjoyed some local entertainment, beverages, and got to tell my own city about this awesome thing called Drupal!
  • 2009
    • May, Chicago        | My First PAID Gig! I am invited to deliver a workshop at the 1st annual CMS Expo in Evanston IL. Local community leader Matthew Lechleider and I wow a good sized crowd for a 1/2 day Drupal intro workshop. I end up meeting many ppl who will play important, longterm roles in my professional life. 

You get the idea! right? :-)
So if you do the math, My first 90 days in Drupal included 80hrs of lullabot workshops, and the first “solo” DrupalCon in North America. That’s pretty intense! It only stands to reason that my perspective on Drupal is one that is Community driven. When I think of Drupal, I think of the Drupal community.

Other upcoming topics include:

  • Why it's important to distinguish the Drupal Communuity as its own entity and appreciate its value and power.
  • How companies have leveraged the Drupal Community and how they've achieved measurable ROI from doing so. 
  • How the Drupal Community is a "Value Added" consideration in the sales process and why the Drupal Community matters when businesses consider which CMS to use for their organization.
  • The evolution of DrupalCamps across the years. Many things have changed!
  • Other topics? Leave a comment on this post if you have an idea for a future blog post! :-)
Drupal Planet

View the discussion thread.

Categories: FLOSS Project Planets

Steve Kemp: A diversion - The National Health Service

Planet Debian - Sun, 2014-08-31 06:51

Today we have a little diversion to talk about the National Health Service. The NHS is the publicly funded healthcare system in the UK.

Actually there are four such services in the UK, only one of which has this name:

  • The national health service (England)
  • Health and Social Care in Northern Ireland.
  • NHS Scotland.
  • NHS Wales.

In theory this doesn't matter, if you're in the UK and you break your leg you get carried to a hospital and you get treated. There are differences in policies because different rules apply, but the basic stuff "free health care" applies to all locations.

(Differences? In Scotland you get eye-tests for free, in England you pay.)

My wife works as an accident & emergency doctor, and has recently changed jobs. Hearing her talk about her work is fascinating.

The hospitals she's worked in (Dundee, Perth, Kirkcaldy, Edinburgh, Livingstone) are interesting places. During the week things are usually reasonably quiet, and during the weekend things get significantly more busy. (This might mean there are 20 doctors to hand, versus three at quieter times.)

Weekends are busy largely because people fall down hills, get drunk and fight, and are at home rather than at work - where 90% of accidents occur.

Of course even a "quiet" week can be busy, because folk will have heart-attacks round the clock, and somebody somewhere will always be playing with a power tool, a ladder, or both!

So what was the point of this post? Well she's recently transferred to working for a childrens hospital (still in A&E) and the patiences are so very different.

I expected the injuries/patients she'd see to differ. Few 10 year olds will arrive drunk (though it does happen), and few adults fall out of trees, or eat washing machine detergent, but talking to her about her day when she returns home is fascinating how many things are completely different from how I expected.

Adults come to hospital mostly because they're sick, injured, or drunk.

Children come to hospital mostly because their parents are paranoid.

A child has a rash? Doctors are closed? Lets go to the emergency ward!

A child has fallen out of a tree and has a bruise, a lump, or complains of pain? Doctors are closed? Lets go to the emergency ward!

I've not kept statistics, though I wish I could, but it seems that she can go 3-5 days between seeing an actually injured or chronicly-sick child. It's the first-time-parents who bring kids in when they don't need to.

Understandable, completely understandable, but at the same time I'm sure it is more than a little frustrating for all involved.

Finally one thing I've learned, which seems completely stupid, is the NHS-Scotland approach to recruitment. You apply for a role, such as "A&E doctor" and after an interview, etc, you get told "You've been accepted - you will now work in Glasgow".

In short you apply for a post, and then get told where it will be based afterward. There's no ability to say "I'd like to be a Doctor in city X - where I live", you apply, and get told where it is post-acceptance. If it is 100+ miles away you either choose to commute, or decline and go through the process again.

This has lead to Kirsi working in hospitals with a radius of about 100km from the city we live in, and has meant she's had to turn down several posts.

And that is all I have to say about the NHS for the moment, except for the implicit pity for people who have to pay (inflated and life-changing) prices for things in other countries.

Categories: FLOSS Project Planets

Europython: EuroPython 2014 Feedback Form

Planet Python - Sun, 2014-08-31 05:48

EuroPython 2014 was a great event and we’d like to learn from you how to make EuroPython 2015 even better. If you attended EuroPython 2014, please take a few moments and fill out our feedback form:

EuroPython 2014 Feedback Form

We will leave the feedback form online for another two weeks and then use the information as basis for the work on EuroPython 2015 and also post a summary of the multiple choice questions (not the comments to protect your privacy) on our website. Many thanks in advance.

Helping with EuroPython 2015

If you would like to help with EuroPython 2015, we invite you to join the EuroPython Society. Membership is free. Just go to our application page and enter your details.

In the coming months, we will start the discussions about the new work group model we’ve announced at the conference.

Enjoy,

EuroPython Society

Categories: FLOSS Project Planets

EuroPython Society: EuroPython 2014 Feedback Form

Planet Python - Sun, 2014-08-31 05:46

EuroPython 2014 was a great event and we’d like to learn from you how to make EuroPython 2015 even better. If you attended EuroPython 2014, please take a few moments and fill out our feedback form:

EuroPython 2014 Feedback Form

We will leave the feedback form online for another two weeks and then use the information as basis for the work on EuroPython 2015 and also post a summary of the multiple choice questions (not the comments to protect your privacy) on our website. Many thanks in advance.

Helping with EuroPython 2015

If you would like to help with EuroPython 2015, we invite you to join the EuroPython Society. Membership is free. Just go to our application page and enter your details.

In the coming months, we will start the discussions about the new work group model we’ve announced at the conference.

Enjoy,

EuroPython Society

Categories: FLOSS Project Planets

Ian Ozsvald: Python Training courses: Data Science and High Performance Python coming in October

Planet Python - Sun, 2014-08-31 05:33

I’m pleased to say that via our ModelInsight we’ll be running two Python-focused training courses in October. The goal is to give you new strong research & development skills, they’re aimed at folks in companies but would suit folks in academia too. UPDATE training courses ready to buy (1 Day Data Science, 2 Day High Performance).

UPDATE we have a <5min anonymous survey which helps us learn your needs for Data Science training in London, please click through and answer the few questions so we know what training you need.

“Highly recommended – I attended in Aalborg in May “:… upcoming Python DataSci/HighPerf training courses”” @ThomasArildsen

These and future courses will be announced on our London Python Data Science Training mailing list, sign-up for occasional announces about our upcoming courses (no spam, just occasional updates, you can unsubscribe at any time).

Intro to Data science with Python (1 day) on Friday 24th October

Students: Basic to Intermediate Pythonistas (you can already write scripts and you have some basic matrix experience)

Goal: Solve a complete data science problem (building a working and deployable recommendation engine) by working through the entire process – using numpy and pandas, applying test driven development, visualising the problem, deploying a tiny web application that serves the results (great for when you’re back with your team!)

  • Learn basic numpy, pandas and data cleaning
  • Be confident with Test Driven Development and debugging strategies
  • Create a recommender system and understand its strengths and limitations
  • Use a Flask API to serve results
  • Learn Anaconda and conda environments
  • Take home a working recommender system that you can confidently customise to your data
  • £300 including lunch, central London (24th October)
  • Additional announces will come via our London Python Data Science Training mailing list
  • Buy your ticket here
High Performance Python (2 day) on Thursday+Friday 30th+31st October

Students: Intermediate Pythonistas (you need higher performance for your Python code)

Goal: learn high performance techniques for performant computing, a mix of background theory and lots of hands-on pragmatic exercises

  • Profiling (CPU, RAM) to understand bottlenecks
  • Compilers and JITs (Cython, Numba, Pythran, PyPy) to pragmatically run code faster
  • Learn r&d and engineering approaches to efficient development
  • Multicore and clusters (multiprocessing, IPython parallel) for scaling
  • Debugging strategies, numpy techniques, lowering memory usage, storage engines
  • Learn Anaconda and conda environments
  • Take home years of hard-won experience so you can develop performant Python code
  • Cost: £600 including lunch, central London (30th & 31st October)
  • Additional announces will come via our London Python Data Science Training mailing list
  • Buy your ticket here

The High Performance course is built off of many years teaching and talking at conferences (including PyDataLondon 2013, PyCon 2013, EuroSciPy 2012) and in companies along with my High Performance Python book (O’Reilly). The data science course is built off of techniques we’ve used over the last few years to help clients solve data science problems. Both courses are very pragmatic, hands-on and will leave you with new skills that have been battle-tested by us (we use these approaches to quickly deliver correct and valuable data science solutions for our clients via ModelInsight). At PyCon 2012 my students rated me 4.64/5.0 for overall happiness with my High Performance teaching.

@ianozsvald [..] Best tutorial of the 4 I attended was yours. Thanks for your time and preparation!” @cgoering

We’d also like to know which other courses you’d like to learn, we can partner with trainers as needed to deliver new courses in London. We’re focused around Python, data science, high performance and pragmatic engineering. Drop me an email (via ModelInsight) and let me know if we can help.

Do please join our London Python Data Science Training mailing list to be kept informed about upcoming training courses.

Ian applies Data Science as an AI/Data Scientist for companies in ModelInsight, sign-up for Data Science tutorials in London. Historically Ian ran Mor Consulting. He also founded the image and text annotation API Annotate.io, co-authored SocialTies, programs Python, authored The Screencasting Handbook, lives in London and is a consumer of fine coffees.
Categories: FLOSS Project Planets

Lucas Nussbaum: Debian trivia

Planet Debian - Sun, 2014-08-31 03:42

After an intensive evening of brainstorming by the 5th floor cabal, I am happy to release the very first version of the Debian Trivia, modeled after the famous TCP/IP Drinking Game. Only the questions are listed here — maybe they should go (with the answers) into a package? Anyone willing to co-maintain? Any suggestions for additional questions?

  • what was the first release with an “and-a-half” release?
  • Where were the first two DebConf held?
  • what are Debian releases named after? Why?
  • Give two names of girls that were originally part of the Debian Archive Kit (dak), that are still actively used today.
  • Swirl on chin. Does it ring a bell?
  • What was Dunc Tank about? Who was the DPL at the time? Who were the release managers during Dunc Tank?
  • Cite 5 different valid values for a package’s urgency field. Are all of them different?
  • When was the Debian Maintainers status created?
  • What is the codename for experimental?
  • Order correctly lenny, woody, etch, sarge
  • Which one was the Dunc Tank release?
  • Name three locations where Debian machines are hosted.
  • What does the B in projectb stand for?
  • What is the official card game at DebConf?
  • Describe the Debian restricted use logo.
  • One Debian release was frozen for more than a year. Which one?
  • name the kernel version for sarge, etch, lenny, squeeze, wheezy. bonus for etch-n-half!
  • What happened to Debian 1.0?
  • Which DebConfs were held in a Nordic country?
  • What does piuparts stand for?
  • Name the first Debian release.
  • Order correctly hamm, bo, potato, slink
  • What are most Debian project machines named after?
Categories: FLOSS Project Planets

digiKam Recipes 3.17.01 Released

Planet KDE - Sun, 2014-08-31 03:37

A new version of the digiKam Recipes ebook is available for download. The new release features a slightly tweaked cover and the new Fix keywords with ExifTool recipe.

Continue reading

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