FLOSS Project Planets

A Requiem for Ian Murdock

LinuxPlanet - Wed, 2015-12-30 18:00

[ This post was crossposted on Conservancy's website. ]

I first met Ian Murdock gathered around a table at some bar, somewhere, after some conference in the late 1990s. Progeny Linux Systems' founding was soon to be announced, and Ian had invited a group from the Debian BoF along to hear about “something interesting”; the post-BoF meetup was actually a briefing on his plans for Progeny.

Many of the details (such as which conference and where on the planet it was), I've forgotten, but I've never forgotten Ian gathering us around, bending my ear to hear in the loud bar, and getting one of my first insider scoops on something big that was about to happen in Free Software. Ian was truly famous in my world; I felt like I'd won the jackpot of meeting a rock star.

More recently, I gave a keynote at DebConf this year and talked about how long I've used Debian and how much it has meant to me. I've since then talked with many people about how the Debian community is rapidly becoming a unicorn among Free Software projects — one of the last true community-driven, non-commercial projects.

A culture like that needs a huge group to rise to fruition, and there are no specific actions that can ensure creation of a multi-generational project like Debian. But, there are lots of ways to make the wrong decisions early. As near as I can tell, Ian artfully avoided the project-ending mistakes; he made the early decisions right.

Ian cared about Free Software and wanted to make something useful for the community. He teamed up with (for a time in Debian's earliest history) the FSF to help Debian in its non-profit connections and roots. And, when the time came, he did what all great leaders do: he stepped aside and let a democratic structure form. He paved the way for the creation of Debian's strong Constitutional and democratic governance. Debian has had many great leaders in its long history, but Ian was (effectively) the first DPL, and he chose not to be a BDFL.

The Free Software community remains relatively young. Thus, loss of our community members jar us in the manner that uniquely unsettles the young. In other words, anyone we lose now, as we've lost Ian this week, has died too young. It's a cliché to say, but I say anyway that we should remind ourselves to engage with those around us every day, and to welcome new people gladly. When Ian invited me around that table, I was truly nobody: he'd never met me before — indeed no one in the Free Software community knew who I was then. Yet, the mere fact that I stayed late at a conference to attend the Debian BoF was enough for him — enough for him to even invite me to hear the secret plans of his new company. Ian's trust — his welcoming nature — remains for me unforgettable. I hope to watch that nature flourish in our community for the remainder of all our lives.

Categories: FLOSS Project Planets

I’ve Got A Date

LinuxPlanet - Fri, 2015-12-25 16:31

A Date At Last

Hello all, I have some exciting news. It’s been a long time since I’ve had cause to use this sentence but… I’ve got a date! Sadly in this context I’m only referring to a date for my upcoming surgery. I’ll be going under the knife at The Christie in Manchester on January 14th 2016. Not far away.

If you’ve read my last 2 or 3 posts you’ll know that I’ve had some serious health problems in recent months. After perplexing a good number of medical professionals I was finally diagnosed with a rare condition known as Pseudomyxoma Peritonei, or PMP for short. Sadly not PIMP which would have sounded much cooler. The treatment involves cutting out all the affected areas and cleaning it up with a heated chemotherapy liquid. It’ll be a pretty long surgical procedure and take months to recover from but the prognosis is good. I will have to be scanned yearly to ensure no return of tumours but with a 75% chance of no re-occurrence in 10 years it’s well worth it I’d say. I won’t go on at length I just wanted to share the date for those people who’ve been asking.

I’m looking forward to Christmas and New Year, I can’t wait to get this surgery out of the way and begin down the road to recovery. Get back to work and all the other things I used to do. I went to see Star Wars last night so at least I was able to do that before my op. I’ve also done some techy things lately I’d like to write about, I’ll share those with you soon. I don’t want to spend all my time on medical talk.

I wish you all Christmas and New Year! I’ll report in again soon

Dan

Categories: FLOSS Project Planets
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