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Cocomore: MySQL - Query optimization

Tue, 2015-06-30 04:02

Queries are the centerpiece of MySQL and they have high optimization potential (in conjunction with indexes). This is specially true for big databases (whatever big means). Modern PHP frameworks tend to execute dozens of queries. Thus, as a first step, it is required to know what the slow queries are. A built-in solution for that is the MySQL slow query log. This can either be activated in my.cnf or dynamically with the --slow_query_log option. In both cases, long_query_time should be reduced to an appropriate value.

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Categories: FLOSS Project Planets

tanay.co.in: Building a Slack Chatbot Powered by Drupal!

Tue, 2015-06-30 00:45
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Ever Since we moved to Slack for our team’s instant messaging needs, what excited me the most is the nice set of APIs that Slack offers to seamlessly integrate your apps into Slack chat.

What we needed immediately was a basic bot that handled Karma functionality allowing people to say ‘Thanks’ to others using the usual ‘++’ annotation.

We were looking at options for various technologies. Node.js is the usual one that you hear a lot when people talk of chatbots these days.

Drupal was an option. We were skeptical at first. Having Drupal intercept and analyze almost 3- 4 messages every second at its peak hours sounded like trouble. And there would be no levels of caching involved here as each message is unique from a different user and should be processed uniquely.

But one clear advantage I could see and wanted to have, was to interface the rest of the team from the various complexities of Slack APIs and configuration, interfacing all of that through Drupal APIs. So if anyone needed to extend this bot further, they should not really worry about Slack API and they should be building very simple Drupal Modules.

Over a weekend, a couple of us teamed to build a chatbot for our Acquia India slack chatrooms, using what we knew best - Drupal. And we launched it on March 1st 2015. Our bot was christened Regina Cassandra. And the bot has been up and running ever since with no downtime or any issues so far.

The Karma Handling..

Rarely used, but it can text people..

And when the Cricket World cup was happening, Regina was busy serving us scores whenever requested..

Regina also used to give everyone a daily fortune cookie. She doesn’t seem to do that anymore for the API that the fortune cookie module was using seems to be dead now.

The bot uses Slack’s Outgoing Webhooks to intercept each message posted to the chatrooms, and allows all modules on the chatbot site to intercept the message and respond to it.

The bot (a Headless Drupal Site) has been hosted on a free-tier Acquia Cloud Subscription. With the decent performance it has had so far and less-than-a-second response times we currently see with the slackbot, we never saw a need to upgrade so far.

Categories: FLOSS Project Planets

Commerce Guys: Comparing Drupal Commerce & Magento

Mon, 2015-06-29 21:53

Much ink has been spilled about which open-source ecommerce platform is the “best.” Most comparisons perpetuate what is typically an easy (but usually incorrect) way of understanding these two platforms and whether they are a fit for your business. They are often compared like word processors based on line item comparisons of features instead of powerful business growth engines and visible brand extensions that they are. To limit them to nothing more than published feature sets or architectural comparisons is foolish, unhelpful, and often leads companies down the wrong path. A better approach is to fully understand current and future business requirements and make a decision based on which solution can serve those needs the best.

At a high level, the most important thing to ask is “do you know what you want and how you want it done?” If you don’t know what you want, then you will likely consider a tool with lots of features out of the box. The tradeoff is that those features come with assumptions that are set in stone. While lots of prepackaged features may feel good now, you risk not being able to adapt as quickly as your competitors or the possibility that modifying those features will lead to incompatibilities down the road. The alternative is a framework where you get a larger feature set and with fewer assumptions. The tradeoff here is that you have more work to do to get off the ground—planning and implementing the exact features and experience you want—but with endless flexibility to mold a solution that exactly meets current and future business requirements. Trying to frame these solutions by purely quantitative just won’t do.

Let’s take a step back from the deeply rooted (and borderline religious) discussion of frameworks and function sets, and examine at a higher level both Drupal Commerce and Magento. For business owners who are trying to figure out what’s best for them and anyone who has any experience with either technology, let’s talk about what really makes Drupal Commerce different from Magento.  Let’s get away from discussions about classes, architecture, benchmarks, features, etc. and instead, talk about each solution and objectively what problems they solve and which they do not.

To start off, I’d like to restate a quote (attribute to Adobe SE leads) from Bryan House’s “Competing with Giants” presentation from DrupalCon Denver:

If you are looking at both (Adobe) CQ5 and Drupal, then one of us is in the wrong place.

This quote struck me. It sank deep into my soul. In a way, once I let the weight of these words really take hold, it completely changed my way of thinking. To help, consider this slight rewording:

If you are looking at both Magento and Drupal Commerce, then one of us is in the wrong place.

The obvious implication of this statement is that both Magento and Drupal Commerce have unique roles in the online commerce ecosystem. They are each geared towards certain types of projects and use cases. Instead of pitting each platform against each other to have a winner based on some arbitrary set of features or architecture, a better approach would be to first establish a clear understanding of customer needs. When the needs of a client are properly applied to the strengths of each platform, one will clearly meet those needs in a way that the other does not. Thus removing the need for a feature comparison.

Framing the solutions

What I’d like to endeavor here is (as much as possible) an unbiased and systematic approach to discussing Drupal + Drupal Commerce and Magento as unique solutions to the question of “which commerce platform should I choose?” Keeping the internals aside, here are the particular use-cases that make a lot of sense for a given project. This isn’t a comprehensive list, but if you’re trying to figure out which platform you should be looking at, then take a look. If you find one column aligning with your particular needs—chances are that’s the one that will be a better fit for your business.

Drupal Commerce Magento Content strategy various types of content with rich relationships, taxonomies, and categories catalog and product content with basic site content or blog Catalog complexity unrestrained catalog creation and product presentation options conventional catalog format and product presentation Product offering non-traditional and mixed-product offerings traditional physical and/or digital product offerings Platform functionality open, flexible feature set and custom application foundation commerce-focused feature set Admin interface basic yet, customizable admin interface robust, rigid admin interface User experience strong, defined vision for bespoke user experience best practice, industry standard user experience Business strategy commerce is a part of larger offering or experience commerce is the strategy Development skill level basic PHP knowledge required advanced PHP knowledge required

Now that we’ve drawn some lines, let’s discuss.

Content Strategy

Drupal Commerce (by way of Drupal) has an extremely powerful content system which allows for boundless creation of content types all with their own custom fields and attributes, editing experience, and a set of rich media tools. Content can be related to each other and those relationships can be harnessed to generate lists of related products and blog posts on product pages, or customized landing pages with unique product listings and content. It’s a breeze to set this up and you can do all of this without touching a line of code. If providing content and information to your customers is vital to your business and how you differentiate yourself from others, Drupal is what you want.

Magento, on the other hand, has a very basic content system. You can add pages, add some content to category pages, and adding attributes to products is painless. There are even some great built-in blog modules. But once you step outside of this, you’re in custom territory. You’ll either need two systems (like a blog or a CMS) or you’ll end up building it all custom into Magento increasing cost and ongoing support. Again, it’s not that Magento can’t do content at all, just that Magento’s content features are pretty basic. Enterprise does expand on this, but you still have a very limited tool set and code changes (requiring a developer) are usually required to expand on it.

Catalog Complexity

Magento offers what any reasonable person might consider to be a wholly conventional approach to catalog management. You have a catalog root, and from there you can create tiers of categories. Products fall into one or more of those categories. In fact, it’s pretty common for a product to exist within multiple groups based on how visitors will look for and try to find those particular products. But Magento is also pretty strict that products really can’t be displayed outside of this hierarchy. Aside from some of the product blocks for up-sells and cross-sells, your ability to display products is completely centered around this. Also, product listings are limited to lists and grids views without additional extensions or modifications.

Drupal Commerce releases you from this constraint. Products can be organized, tagged, and dynamically added to or removed from product lists automatically. A traditional catalog-like user experience can be built. But the catalog automatically follows how you already organize your product and can use virtually any attribute that exists on a product. And when you want to display your products, you can choose from a number of pluggable styles from tables, grids, lists, and each product can have it’s own customized look and feel in a product list, too. This can make a huge difference as you try to differentiate, promote, and get your visitors engaged in what you have to offer—no matter how many products you have or how complicated they are.

Product Offering

If you’re selling physical and/or digital products, both platforms are fairly good at that. In fact, Magento again has a lot of features that don’t require individual setup. Want simple and no-fuss sales of traditional products? Magento can tackle that easily. With Drupal Commerce, you start with a basic product structure and are then free to build exactly what you want no matter how complex it might be.

When it comes to non-traditional offerings—event registrations, donations, recurring billing, licensing, and subscription service models—Drupal Commerce provides tools to configure or build what you need without having to reinvent the wheel. And best of all, you can mix any and all of these product types pretty easily. So if you want to do registrations, t-shirt sales, and a recurring monthly donation, you can easily support that in a single site and in a single transaction.

Platform Functionality

Magento has a well implemented and cohesive commerce feature set. And frankly, if you’re judging a product solely on the published feature set, Magento looks good. That’s not because Drupal Commerce doesn’t have a great feature set—in fact it’s much more expansive than Magento’s—but Drupal Commerce’s flexibility is in the expansive and ever-growing list of modules. It’s hard to quantify. If you’re only looking for a shopping cart and you’re happy with what Magento provides, it may very well be the right choice.

However, if you are wanting to integrate features that go beyond commerce—you want to define and build your own custom application or create a totally unique customer experience—then Drupal Commerce will be a much better platform enabling you to adapt quickly to business and market changes.  Entire new areas of functionality can be configured and enabled just  like a new feature.  Whether you’re adding customer portals, forums, web services, an LMS, or even back office functionality, Drupal can give you the agility and freedom to change and grow as you need to.

Admin Interface

While Drupal’s administrative interface can be endlessly customized and tailored to your specific needs (in many cases without even touching the code), it generally tends to be pretty basic. It is trivial to create new screens, targeted to specific users, that gives specific information and actions that can be performed on that information. In short, you can get what you want, but you’ll have to spend the time configuring it.

Magento’s administrative interface is comprehensive and gives users a structured, well-defined way to manage the entire store. If you’re willing to use what’s out of the box, then it will serve you well. The pain will come if you ever decide to deviate from the out of the box experience. Customizations require code modification and even “small changes” could require considerable effort to complete.

User Experience

When it comes to user experience, Magento delivers a best-practices, industry standard implementation of a traditional shopping cart: you get a catalog, a cart with a one-page checkout, account pages, etc. It’s designed to be a finished product, so you can pretty much trust it will all be there and that it will work well.

Drupal Commerce provides all of that same functionality, but expects you to expend some effort to make it look good. At a minimum, you’ll need to theme it. That’s not much to ask since you’re likely already doing that for the rest of your site. Drupal’s theme system is extremely powerful and adding unique or advanced features can be really easy. In some cases, little to no theme work is required. In addition, the user experience for path to purchase can be more easily integrated with the content experience, giving the merchant far more content marketing and merchandizing avenues.

Business Strategy

Drupal is a powerful platform. If you don’t know what I’m talking about, it is something that can’t be explained in a single paragraph. Drupal can be a community form, a wiki, an LMS, a translatable content management platform, a web services platform, and an online store. In fact, it could be all of these things at one time. If your vision calls for a platform that can do more than one thing, Drupal can rise to the challenge and integrate several business platforms under a single (software and hardware) roof.

Magento, no surprise here, is a shopping cart. That’s what it does. It does it well, but if you are wanting to integrate Magento with another part of your business (e.g. magazine subscriptions, forum membership, etc.) you’ll have to deal with two independent systems talking with each other. You’ll be synchronizing your data between multiple systems and having to keep everything up to date with custom or 3rd party solutions.

Development Skills

If you’re wondering how easy it’ll be to integrate your team with either Drupal Commerce or Magento, here’s what you need to know.

Magento is a very powerful and complex system. It’s makes heavy use of objects, inheritance, and programming concepts that are confusing to basic and even some moderately experienced PHP developers. Getting acclimated to Magento as a back-end or front-end developer could take weeks or months, depending on the experience level. Also, architecturally, Magento does have some profound gotchas when it comes to adding and developing many extensions on a site. Documentation is so-so but there is a very active community of bloggers, training is available, and Magento support is pretty widely available.

Drupal Commerce is much simpler and even people with minimal to no PHP experience can customize and pick it up within a few days. While parts of Drupal use objects (such as Views and the entity system) much of it is procedural. Drupal is designed to be much more accessible to individuals without coding experience. This flexibility is made available to non-coders through the various modules (such as Views, Rules, features, VBO, etc.) that offer powerful UIs to manage it. However, when code is necessary, bespoke modules can often be very simple. Documentation is generally very good for things like Drupal and Drupal Commerce, while contributed modules can vary from having non-existent to excellent documentation. Again, a very active and friendly community exists to support Drupal developers and users, and a wide range of training and support is available.

Conclusion

When deciding on an open source ecommerce solution, it is important to first look at the fundamentals of your business and identify your priorities. By doing this you will avoid the needless exercise of features comparisons and checklists and quickly conclude that one of these solutions is in the wrong place.  If content is important to how you engage with customers and sell your product and if you want to control and choose how the solution supports your business needs, Drupal + Drupal Commerce is generally the right choice.

Categories: FLOSS Project Planets

X-Team: Drupalwood: Why you should attend a DrupalCon

Mon, 2015-06-29 17:41

Time flies – it’s already summer, and I hope yours is going well! Seems like just yesterday I was at DrupalCon in Los Angeles, the famous city of movie-making – to make it sound more like a dream… at least my own dream, one that was made true. Because part of our team was invited...

The post Drupalwood: Why you should attend a DrupalCon appeared first on X-Team.

Categories: FLOSS Project Planets

DrupalCon News: DrupalCon Programming Announced - Sessions and Training Selected!

Mon, 2015-06-29 16:22

One of the most exciting aspects of preparing for a DrupalCon is selecting the sessions that will be presented. It’s always incredibly cool and humbling to see all the great ideas that our community comes up with— and they’re all so great that making the official selections is definitely not an easy process! This time, the Track Chairs had over 500 sessions to read through to determine what content would be presented in Barcelona.

Categories: FLOSS Project Planets

Forum One: Join Us at Drupal GovCon!

Mon, 2015-06-29 16:05

We’re excited for Drupal GovCon coming up on July 22nd! We can’t wait to spend time with the Drupal4Gov community and meet fellow Drupalers from all over! Forum One will be presenting sessions in all four tracks: Site Building, Business and Strategy, Code & DevOps, and Front-end, User Experience and Design! Check out our sessions to learn more about Drupal 8 and other topics!

Here our are sessions at a glance…

What’s in Your Audit? A Guide to Auditing Drupal Sites

Nervous about providing support for a new Drupal site? A comprehensive audit will prepare you to take on Drupal sites that weren’t built by you. Join this session and learn from Forum One’s John Brandenburg as he reviews the audit checklist the our team uses before we take over support work for any Drupal site.

Drupal 8 for Non-developers

Drupal 8’s getting close to launching – do you feel like you need a crash course in what this means? Join Forum One’s Chaz Chumley as he demystifies Drupal 8 for you and teaches you all that you need to know about the world of developers.

The Drupal 8 Decision: Budgets, Bosses, and Bul@#$% Standing between You and the Next World-class CMS

If you’re wondering how to prepare your organization for upgrading your sites to Drupal 8, join WETA’s Jess Snyder, along with Forum One’s Andrew Cohen and Chaz Chumley as they answer questions about the available talent, budgets, goals, and more in regards to Drupal 8.

The Building Blocks of D8

The building blocks of Drupal have changed and now’s the unique time to rethink how to build themes in Drupal 8. Join Chaz Chumley as he dissects a theme and exposes the best practices that we should all be adopting for Drupal 8.

Building Realtime Applications with Drupal and Node.js

Drupal 8’s first class REST interface opens up a world of opportunities to build interactive applications. Come learn how to connect a Node application to Drupal to create dynamic updates from Forum One’s William Hurley as he demonstrates the capabilities of both JavaScript and Node.js using Drupal, AngularJS, and Sails.js!

Automating Deployments

Are you excited to launch your new website, but getting held down by all the steps it takes for your code to make it online? On top of that, each change requires the same long process all over again… what a nail biting experience! Join William Hurley as he demonstrates the power of Jenkins and Capistrano for managing continuous integration and deployment using your git repository.

Combining the Power of Views and Rules

If you’re a beginner who has found the Views module confusing, come check out this session and learn important features of this popular module from Leanne Duca and Forum One’s Onaje Johnston. They’ll also highlight some additional modules that extend the power of Views.

Paraphrasing Panels, Panelizer and Panopoly

Have you ever felt that Panels, Panelizer and Panopoly were a bit overwhelming? Well, come to our session from Forum One’s Keenan Holloway. He will go over the best features of each one and how they are invaluable tools. Keenan will also give out a handy cheat sheet to remember it all, so make sure to stop by!

D3 Data Visualization

Data visualization is the go to right now! Maps, charts, interactive presentations – what tools do you use to build your visual data story? We feel that D3.js is the best tool, so come listen to Keenan Holloway explain why you should be using D3, how to use D3’s visualization techniques, and more.

To the Pattern Lab! Better Collaboration in Drupal Using Atomic Design Principles

Implementing modular design early on in any Drupal project will improve your team’s workflow and efficiency! Attend our session to learn from our very own Daniel Ferro on how to use styleguide/prototyping tools like Pattern Lab to increase collaboration between designers, themers, developers, and your organization on Drupal projects.

Integrating Mentoring into an Open Source Community that Welcomes and Values New Contributors

Are you hoping to mentor new contributors? Check out this session where Forum One’s Kalpana Goel and Cathy Theys from BlackMesh will talk about how to integrate mentoring into all the layers of an open source project and how to develop mentoring into a habit. They’ll be using the Drupal community as an example!

Building an Image Gallery with Drupal 8

If you’re a beginner looking to set up an image gallery, attend this session! Leanne Duca and Onaje Johnston will guide you in how to set up a gallery in Drupal 8 and how to overcome any challenges you may encounter!

Painting a Perfect Picture with Gesso

Attend this session and learn how to design and theme Drupal sites using Atomic Design and the Drupal 8 CSS architecture guidelines from our very own Dan Mouyard! He’ll go over our Gesso theme and our version of Pattern Lab and how they allow us to quickly design and prototype reusable design components, layouts, and pages.

Can’t make it to all of the sessions? Don’t worry, you’ll be able to catch us outside of our scheduled sessions! If you want to connect, stop by our table or check us out on Twitter (@ForumOne). We can’t wait to see you at DrupalGovCon!

Categories: FLOSS Project Planets

Drupal Association News: See you at OSCON 2015

Mon, 2015-06-29 13:51

OSCON, the annual open source conference, brings over 4,000 people together in Portland this July. We are a proud participant again this year and we are excited to talk about Drupal to a wider audience. If you are looking for a reason to attend, you can use the code USRG which will get you 20% off your registration. Or you can use the PCEXPOPLUS code to gain admission to the exhibition hall for free.

Taking Drupal to the larger open source world is a big job, and we need our amazing community's help. Help us spread the word that Drupal is at OSCON! If you're attending, please come by and say hi, let your new friends know they can find us in the nonprofit pavilion at table #6 from Tuesday evening through Thursday afternoon. Or, if you know someone who's in open source who will be at OSCON, please encourage them to come by and say hello! Here's a tweet you can share with your networks to help us spread the word:

Tweet: Going to OSCON 2015? Stop by and say hello. We'll be Drupalin' in the expo hall, nonprofit pavilion.

Thanks to the Portland Drupal community for helping out and to everyone for volunteering time at OSCON. If you want to help out by volunteering at the table, we'd love your assistance! You can sign up here.

See you at OSCON!

Personal blog tags: OSCON
Categories: FLOSS Project Planets

The Jibe: Why Drupal 8 is truly awesome for service providers

Mon, 2015-06-29 13:16

A couple days ago, I received the first in a series of white papers created by the Drupal Association to help Drupal service providers prepare for (and arguably market) Drupal 8.

Categories: FLOSS Project Planets

Drupal core announcements: No Drupal 6 or Drupal 7 core release on Wednesday, July 1

Mon, 2015-06-29 09:42

The monthly Drupal core bug fix/feature release window is scheduled for this Wednesday. However, there have not been enough changes to the development version since the last bug fix/feature release two months ago to warrant a new release, so there will be no Drupal core release on that date.

Upcoming release windows include:

  • Wednesday, July 15 (security release window)
  • Wednesday, August 5 (bug fix/feature release window)

For more information on Drupal core release windows, see the documentation on release timing and security releases, and the discussion that led to this policy being implemented.

Categories: FLOSS Project Planets

Annertech: Building a Website on a Budget

Mon, 2015-06-29 07:01
Building a Website on a Budget

So you want a website. Maybe it is your first website. Maybe you've been here before, but you're starting afresh. You're full of enthusiasm. In your dreams, your website looks like a flashy cruise liner - huge, and with every amenity money can buy. However, your budget stretches to a dinghy with an outboard motor. So how can you rationalise your aspirations within your financial constraints?

You don't have to be a paragon of fiscal rectitude, but you do need to prioritise, and think a little cleverly about how you can approach the project.

Categories: FLOSS Project Planets

Web Omelette: Go custom or use a contributed module?

Mon, 2015-06-29 03:00

That is the main question. If you came here looking for a definitive answer, I'm afraid you won't find one. What you maybe will find is a discussion I propose on this topic and my two cents on the matter.

Why am I talking about this?

I've been working on a big Drupal website recently which has many contributed and custom modules. One of my recent tasks has been enabling validation of an existent text field used for inputting phone numbers. The client needed this number in a specific format. No problem, a quick regex inside hook_node_validate() should do the trick nicely. But then it got me thinking? Isn't there a module I can use for this instead? Well yes there is: Field validation.

I installed this module which comes with a plethora of validation rules and possibilities. The default phone validation for my country was not matching the client expectation so I had to use a custom expression for that. No problem, achieved basically the same result. But was this the better option under the circumstances? You might say yes because people have been working on this module a long time to perfect it, keep it secure and provide all sorts of goodies under the hood. Not to mention that it's used on over 10.000 websites.

However, the Field Validation module is big. It has a bunch of functionality that allows you to perform all sorts of validation on fields. This is not a bad thing, don't get me wrong. But does my little validation need warrant the installation and loading into memory of so much code? My custom solution was very targeted and took no more than 10 or so lines of code.

One argument would be that yes, because I may need other kinds of validation rules in the future so you can use this module also for those. But I think that being already very far in the lifetime of this website the odds are quite low of that. And even if this is the case, will an extra 2-3 validation needs warrant the use of this module?

On the other hand, you can argue that your custom code is not vetted, is difficult to maintain, can be insecure if you make mistakes and basically represents some non-configurable magic on your site. These can all be true but can also all be false depending on the developer, how they document code and the functionality itself.

I ended up with the custom solution in this case because on this site I really want to introduce new modules only if they bring something major to the table (performance being my concern here). So of course, the choice heavily depends on the actual module you are considering, the website it would go on and the custom code you'd write as an alternative.

Moreover, please do not focus on the actual Field Validation module in this discussion. I am not here to discuss its merits but the whether or not installing any such module that serves a tiny purpose is the right way to go. This is mostly a Drupal 7 problem as in D8 we use object oriented practices by which we can have as much code as we want because we only load the necessary parts when needed.

So what do you think? Do you have a general rule when it comes to this decision or you also take it case by case basis? If the latter, what are your criteria for informing your choice? If the former, why is this? I'd love to hear what you have to say.

In Drupal var switchTo5x = true;stLight.options({"publisher":"dr-8de6c3c4-3462-9715-caaf-ce2c161a50c"});
Categories: FLOSS Project Planets

Matt Glaman: Fixing "UpdaterException: Unable to determine the type of the source directory"

Sun, 2015-06-28 12:04

I don't use the built in update functionality provided by the Update module for updating code. I like to use it for reminders and push back statistics of modules used for Drupal.org. However, someone people do use it. Sometimes this piece of functionality can fail and throw an interesting message which doesn't seem to have many answers despite the best Google-fu.

UpdaterException: Unable to determine the type of the source directory. in Updater::factory() (line 99 of ../www/includes/updater.inc).

An exception because a source directory can't be determined. Turns out that the logic before the exception throw is checking if the temporary directory containing update downloads is an actual directory.

It is looking for the following:

$directory = 'temporary://update-extraction-' . _update_manager_unique_identifier();

If you encounter this error, check your file system settings (/admin/config/media/file-system) and make sure the temporary directory is configured properly. If you're not sure what it should be, remove the entry and resave the form, populating your web server's default. Then make sure Drupal (or, rather, your webserver) has permissions to write to that temporary directory.

Categories: FLOSS Project Planets

Red Crackle: What is headless Drupal?

Sun, 2015-06-28 09:57
Recently you must have heard of the term "headless Drupal". You may be wondering what exactly it is. How is it different than standard Drupal and how can you implement it? If these are the questions that are plaguing you, then this is the post for you.
Categories: FLOSS Project Planets

DrupalCon News: Announcing Community-Focused Keynotes at DrupalCon Barcelona

Fri, 2015-06-26 17:57

For a new twist on our keynotes, we are excited that our Thursday mainstage will highlight two community speakers that both have important and intersting topics that all Drupalers can benefit from hearing.  

Categories: FLOSS Project Planets

qed42.com: June - Drupal Monthly MeetUp

Fri, 2015-06-26 16:36

This month Pune Drupal group had more than 75 active attendees participating in Drupal Monthly Meetup. We are thankful to Cybage Software Pvt Ltd  for hosting the event on 26th June 2015 at their premises.

The basic agenda of the meetup was to launch the Pune Drupal Camp 2015 website and present the camp highlights. 

Categories: FLOSS Project Planets

Promet Source: Open Source's Impact on Government

Fri, 2015-06-26 14:01
.GOV Websites Declare Independence from Proprietary CMS Solutions

Relying on proprietary CMS solutions in the government space would inevitably lead to disgruntled users who consistently remark on the clunky workflows, heavy reliance on technical staff to make changes and diminishing value as the platforms age and require more and more maintenance.

Categories: FLOSS Project Planets

TimOnWeb.com: How To Force Search API To Reindex a Node / an Entity

Fri, 2015-06-26 12:56

By default Search API (Drupal 7) reindexes a node when the node gets updated. But what if you want to reindex a node / an entity on demand or via some other hook i.e. outside of update cycle? Turned out it is a quite simple exercise. You just need to ...

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Categories: FLOSS Project Planets

TimOnWeb.com: Adding a custom extra field to entity / node display

Fri, 2015-06-26 12:56

I had a case recently, where I needed to add custom data to the node display and wanted this data to behave like a field, however the data itself didn't belong to a field. By "behaving like a field" I mean you can that field at node display settings and ...

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Categories: FLOSS Project Planets

TimOnWeb.com: Replacing Menu Item Visibility module with custom "in code" solution

Fri, 2015-06-26 12:56

I'm a big fan of fighting with Drupal's inefficiencies and bottlenecks. Most of these come from contrib modules. Everytime we install a contrib module we should be ready for surprises which come on board with the module.

One of the latest examples is Menu item visibility (https://drupal.org/project ...

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Categories: FLOSS Project Planets