FLOSS Project Planets

Kubuntu Team Launches Plasma Mobile References Images

Planet KDE - Sat, 2015-07-25 05:47

The Kubuntu team is proud to announce the references images for Plasma Mobile.

Plasma Mobile was announced today at KDE's Akademy conference.

Our images can be installed on a Nexus 5 phone.

More information on Plasma Mobile's website.

Categories: FLOSS Project Planets

Embracing Mobile

Planet KDE - Sat, 2015-07-25 05:18

At Blue Systems, we have been working on making Plasma shine for a while now. We’ve contributed much to the KDE Frameworks 5 and Plasma 5 projects, and helping with the transition to Qt5. Much of this work has been involving porting, stabilizing and improving existing code. With the new architecture in place, we’ve also worked on new topics, such as Plasma on non-desktop (and non-laptop) devices.

Plasma Mobile on an LG Nexus 5

This work is coming to fruition now, and we feel that it has reached a point where we want to present it to a more general public. Today we unveil the Plasma Mobile project. Its aim is to offer a Free (as in Freedom), user-friendly, privacy-enabling and customizable platform for mobile devices. Plasma Mobile runs on top of Linux, uses Wayland for rendering graphics and offers a device-specific user interface using the KDE Frameworks and Plasma library and tooling. Plasma Mobile is under development, and not usable by end users now. Missing functionality and stability problems are normal in this phase of development and will be ironed out. Plasma Mobile provides basic functionality and an opportunity for developers to jump in now and shape the mobile platform, and how we use our mobile devices.

As is necessary with development on mobile devices, we’ve not stopped at providing source code that “can be made to work”, rather we’re doing a reference implementation of Plasma Mobile that can be used by those who would like to build a product based on Plasma Mobile on their platform. The reference implementation is based on Kubuntu, which we chose because there is a lot of expertise in our team with Kubuntu, and at Blue Systems we already have continuous builds and package creation in place. Much of the last year was spent getting the hardware to work, and getting our code to boot on a phone. With pride, we’re now announcing the general availability of this project for public contribution. In order to make clear that this is not an in-house project, we have moved the project assets to KDE infrastructure and put under Free software licenses (GPL and LGPL according to KDE’s licensing policies). Plasma Mobile’s reference implementation runs on an LG Nexus 5 smartphone, using an Android kernel, Ubuntu user space and provides an integrated Plasma user interface on top of all that. We also have an x86 version, running on an ExoPC, which can be useful for testing.

Plasma Mobile uses the Wayland display protocol to render the user interface. KWin, Plasma’s window manager and compositor plays a central role. For apps that do not support Wayland, we provide X11 support through the XWayland compatibility layer.

Plasma Mobile is a truly converged user interface. More than 90% of its code is shared with the traditional desktop user interface. The mobile workspace is implemented in the form of a shell or workspace suitable for mobile phones. The shell provides an app launcher, a quick settings panel and a task switcher. Other functionality, such as a dialer, settings, etc. is implemented using specialized components that can be mixed and matched to create a specific user experience or to provide additional functionality — some of them already known from Plasma Desktop.

Architecture diagram of Plasma Mobile

Plasma Mobile is developed in a public and open development process. Contributions are welcome and encouraged throughout the process. We do not want to create another walled garden, but an inclusive platform for creation of mobile device user experiences. We do not want to create releases behind closed doors and throw them over the wall once in a while, but create a leveled playing field for contributors to work together and share their work. Plasma Mobile’s code is available on git.kde.org, and its development is discussed on the plasma-devel mailinglist. In the course of Akademy, we have a number of sessions planned to flesh out more and more detailed plans for further development.

With the basic workspace and OS integration work done, we have laid a good base for further development, and for others to get their code to run on Plasma Mobile. More work which is already in our pipeline includes support for running Android applications, which potentially brings a great number of mature apps to Plasma Mobile, better integration with other Plasma Devices, such as your desktop or laptop through KDE Connect, an improved SDK making it very easy to get a full-fledged development environment set up in minutes, and of course more applications.

Categories: FLOSS Project Planets

Edward J. Yoon: 노이즈 마케팅 vs 오픈소스의 선구자

Planet Apache - Sat, 2015-07-25 03:48
노이즈 마케팅인가, 오픈소스의 선구자인가 .. (?)

 내가 8년 이상 오픈소스계에 몸 담고 하나 배운 것이 있다면, 그것에는 그냥 단순한 collective-intelligence framework 또는 movement뿐 아니라 strategy도 있다는 것이다. 이 때문에, 오픈소스라고 모두 같은 오픈소스가 아니고 그것의 태생과 전략적 goal이 무엇이냐에 따라 다르게 봐야한다.

 가끔 엔하위키라는 곳을 방문하면 재미를 추구하는 덕후 잉여들이 함께 만들어가는 공공 데이터베이스 플랫폼이라는 존재감이 굉장히 묵직(?)하다. 오픈소스계에도 이렇게 유쾌한 프로젝트가 많다.

 한편, 엔하위키에도 영리화 시도와 분쟁이 있었던 것으로 아는데 보통 이러한 공공재의 소유권 또는 영리화에 대한 분쟁은 다수의 user와 contributor들의 judging에 따라 결론이 난다.

 그렇다. 오픈소스 그것이 공공재화된 프로젝트인지 이익집단 특수목적을 위한 마케팅 수단인지 확인하는 방법도 그냥 유저와 컨트리뷰터의 반응을 보면 된다.

 아쉽게도 요즘은 전략적 오픈소스 활동이 반 이상인 듯 하다. 최근 한국에서도 오픈소스 분쟁 뉴스를 간혹 읽게 되는데, 그 내면은 잘 모르고 대단히 복잡하겠지만 한쪽에만 색이 입혀진 기사를 보면 이게 노이즈 마케팅인지 한국의 오픈소스 선구자인지 판단하기 어려워 읽기가 편치 않다.
Categories: FLOSS Project Planets

Norbert Preining: PiwigoPress release 2.30

Planet Debian - Sat, 2015-07-25 02:11

I just pushed a new release of PiwigoPress (main page, WordPress plugin dir) to the WordPress servers. This release incorporates some new features, mostly contributed by Anton Lavrov (big thanks!)

The new features are:

  • Shortcode: multiple ids can be specified, including ranges (not supported in the shortcode generator)
  • Display of image name/title: in addition to the description, also the name/title can be displayed. Here three possible settings can be choosen: 0 – never show titles (default as before), 1 – always show titles, and ‘auto’ – show only titles that do not look like auto-generated titles. (supported in the shortcode generator)

I also checked that the plugin runs with the soon to be released WordPress 4.3, and fixed a small problem with the setting of ‘albumpicture’ not being saved.

That’s all, enjoy, and leave your wishlist items and complains at the issue tracker on the github project piwigopress.

Categories: FLOSS Project Planets

Michal Čihař: Migrating phpMyAdmin from SourceForge.net

Planet Debian - Sat, 2015-07-25 00:00

Some time ago we've decided to move phpMyAdmin out of SourceForge.net services. This was mostly motivated by issues with sf.net bundling crapware with installers (though we were not affected), but also we've missed some features that we would like to have and were not possible there.

The project relied on SourceForge.net with several services. The biggest ones being website and downloads hosting, issue tracking and mailing lists. We've chosen different approach for each of these.

As first, we've moved away website and downloads. Thanks to generous offer of CDN77.com, everything went quite smoothly and we now have HTTPS secured website and downloads, see our announcement. Oh and on the way we've started to PGP sign the releases as well, so you can verify the download.

Shortly after this SourceForge.net was hit by major problems with infrastructure. Unfortunately we were not yet completely ready with rest of the migration, but this has definitely pushed us to make progress faster.

During the outage, we've opened up issue tracker on GitHub, to be able to receive bug reports from our users. On the background I've worked on the issue migration. The good news is that as of now almost all issues are migrated. There are few missing ones, but these will be hopefully handled in upcoming days as well.

Last but not least, we had mailing lists on SourceForge.net. We've shortly discussed available options and decided to run own mail server with these. It will allow us greater flexibility while still using well know software in background. Initial attempts with Mailman 3 failed, so we got back to Mailman 2, which is stable and easy to configure. See also our news posts for official announcement.

Thanks to SourceForge.net, it has been great home for us, but now we have better places to live.

Filed under: English phpMyAdmin | 0 comments

Categories: FLOSS Project Planets

Steve Kemp: We're in Finland now.

Planet Debian - Fri, 2015-07-24 22:00

So we've recently spent our first week together in Helsinki, Finland.

Mostly this has been stress-free, but there are always oddities about living in new places, and moving to Europe didn't minimize them.

For the moment I'll gloss over the differences and instead document the computer problem I had. Our previous shared-desktop system had a pair of drives configured using software RAID. I pulled one of the drives to use in a smaller-cased system (smaller so it was easier to ship).

Only one drive of a pair being present make mdadm scream, via email, once per day, with reports of failure.

The output of cat /proc/mdstat looked like this:

md2 : active raid1 sdb6[0] [LVM-storage-area] 1903576896 blocks super 1.2 2 near-copies [2/1] [_U] md1 : active raid10 sdb5[1] [/root] 48794112 blocks super 1.2 2 near-copies [2/1] [_U] md0 : active raid1 sdb1[0] [/boot] 975296 blocks super 1.2 2 near-copies [2/1] [_U]

See the "_" there? That's the missing drive. I couldn't remove the drive as it wasn't present on-disk, so this failed:

mdadm --fail /dev/md0 /dev/sda1 mdadm --remove /dev/md0 /dev/sda1 # repeat for md1, md2.

Similarly removing all "detached" drives failed, so the only thing to do was to mess around re-creating the arrays with a single drive:

lvchange -a n shelob-vol mdadm --stop /dev/md2 mdadm --create /dev/md2 --level=1 --raid-devices=1 /dev/sdb6 --force ..

I did that on the LVM-storage area, and the /boot partition, but "/" is still to be updated. I'll use knoppix/similar to do it next week. That'll give me a "RAID" system which won't alert every day.

Thanks to the joys of re-creation the UUIDs of the devices changed, so /etc/mdadm/mdadm.conf needed updating. I realized that too late, when grub failed to show the menu, because it didn't find it's own UUID. Handy recipe for the future:

set prefix=(md/0)/grub/ insmod linux linux (md/0)/vmlinuz-3.16.0-0.bpo.4-amd64 root=/dev/md1 initrd (md/0)//boot/initrd.img-3.16.0-0.bpo.4-amd64 boot
Categories: FLOSS Project Planets

OSTraining: How to Create a Glossary View in Drupal

Planet Drupal - Fri, 2015-07-24 17:36

When you first install the Views module, it comes with several example views.

One of the most popular examples is the Glossary view, which takes a large amount of content and organizes it all by the first letter of the content title. This is useful in a lot of situations, especially when you're creating a directory of businesses or people.

Here's what the Glossary view looks like:

Categories: FLOSS Project Planets

Bryan Pendleton: Close readings of code

Planet Apache - Fri, 2015-07-24 16:37

In literature class, we all learned the notion of close reading, a disciplined approach to really studying and really understanding a work of literature.

Although program code is (usually) not literature, the techniques of close reading apply there, too.

Last winter, John Regehr's Nibble Sort Programming Contest inspired a number of truly wonderful close readings of code:

  • Nibblesort: Adventures in OptimizationI decided to enter the contest because I don’t usually work on low-level optimization, either writing hand-tuned code or working on compiler transformations to make “normal” code execute in a more efficient way. I eventually submitted an entry that did pretty well (top half of the non-SIMD entries), and learned several “morals” about optimization along the way.
  • Parallel Nibble SortI chose to implement the sort using a sorting network. I used the following minimum-depth network to sort 16 items, which was designed by David C. Van Voorhis.
  • Nibble SortBeing susceptible to nerd sniping, this problem stuck in my head and I ended up spending two Saturday afternoons trying to implement a fast solution.

Of the three essays, I liked Jordan Rose's the best, although all three are nice.

Let's hear it for close reading of code!

Oh, and lastly: I particularly enjoyed that the prize for the competition was a copy of Hacker's Delight, perhaps the most unusual and most wonderful, if most challenging, computer textbook ever written. I have the first edition of Warren's incredible book on my reading stand, and every so often I crack it open at a random page and disappear into half an hour of reverie...

Too bad I was never a compiler writer; I suspect I would have enjoyed it.

Categories: FLOSS Project Planets

VM(doh): 6 Reasons Why Drupal 8 is an Exciting Step Forward

Planet Drupal - Fri, 2015-07-24 16:21

Drupal 8, which has been in beta for a few months now, is causing plenty of excitement. In the beginning, Drupal made confident claims that it would be a major step forward:

Drupal 8 will set a new standard for ease of use, while offering countless new ways to tailor and deploy your content to the Web. Easily customize data structures, listings, and pages, and take advantage of new capabilities for displaying data on mobile devices, building APIs, and adapting to multilingual needs.

Drupal 8 has many new features, and Drupal.org also describes it as having a "leaner, meaner core," an "easier migration process from earlier versions," and "in-place content editing tools." Modules and themes will also become more powerful because of Drupal 8's adoption of OOP (Object Oriented Programming).

1. Creating a Bridge for New Developers

And speaking of the new OOP approach, this new feature might be one of the more exciting aspects of Drupal 8.

It's finally building a bridge to new developers.

Drupal 8 is much more compatible with the programming standards of PHP, and this means that new developers who may not know Drupal very well can still come in with their OOP PHP familiarity and contribute to projects.

Besides adding a wider door through which more developers can pass, Drupal 8 is improving things in all the ways you might expect in our current Age of the Smart Device:

2. Drupal 8 is Actually Mobile-First, Not Just Mobile-Friendly

Drupal 8, not surprisingly, will be mobile-first. It's a good thing too. According to SmartInsights.com, 80% of Internet users now own a smart phone, and the majority of digital media consumption is now done on mobile devices. Mobile-first is the new standard for web design, and Drupal 8 is embracing that trend. For example, Drupal 8's built-in themes are all responsive, and the administration toolbar is mobile-first.

3. File System-Based Configuration

The new management system makes it easy to switch configuration changes with greater consolidation and versatility (which translates into fewer headaches). Here's how Drupal describes it:

Drupal 8 has a whole new configuration system to store configuration data in a consistent manner. All of your site configuration from enabled modules through fields, contact categories to views, are stored with this system. The system is designed to make it much easier than prior Drupal versions to make changes, export site configuration to files, and import those changes back into the site.

4. HTML 5-Based Markup

HTML 5-based markup means, among other things, native input tools that make it simple to design for mobile. It also means that the output templates have simpler elements. It's definitely a much-needed feature. And they were thorough with it, as their initial list of HTML 5 objectives reveals:

The main goals of this initiative will be to implement HTML5 in Drupal core in a way that will:

  • Have the most benefit for end users.
  • Enable contributed modules and themes to evolve using HTML5.
  • Allow theme developers to control where to use the new semantic elements, and opt out entirely if they so choose.
  • Adding support for the new form elements to Drupal's Form API.
  • Adding new semantic elements in core templates in an appropriate way.
  • Adding ARIA roles to markup to improve accessibility.
  • Simplifying style and script elements.
  • Ensuring input filters and functions accept HTML5 elements.
5. Much Easier Editing

Drupal 8 features a new WYSIWYG configuration, two-column editing, improved draft-saving, and the ability to edit content without reverting to the full edit mode.

6. Drupal 8 Will Speak Your Language

Drupal has its eyes on the global prize, and Drupal 8 is clear evidence of this. It has powerful multilingual features: it has built-in interfaces that can translate anything in the system, it will grab software translation updated automatically from Drupal, and, according to Drupal, it can "build pages with Views language filtering and block visibility."

Powerful indeed.

Contact us or subscribe to our newsletter for more helpful tips and insights about Drupal.

Categories: FLOSS Project Planets

Tim Millwood: Drupal Statistics 2.0

Planet Drupal - Fri, 2015-07-24 16:15
Since February 2012 I have been the maintainer of the Statistics module in Drupal core. Since then I...
Categories: FLOSS Project Planets

Red Crackle: Adding A Drupal Commerce Product And Product Display

Planet Drupal - Fri, 2015-07-24 15:49
This article is the first in a tutorial series that teaches beginners how to configure a Drupal Commerce site. Follow this series to gain a basic understanding on how to build online stores of your choice. The focus of this specific article is on installing Drupal Commerce on an existing Drupal installation and then adding a product and displaying it on the site. By the end of this article, you will be able to create a basic product page in Drupal with an “Add to cart” button.
Categories: FLOSS Project Planets

groups.drupal.org frontpage posts: RMS, Free Software Movement and Drupal... NYCcamp

Planet Drupal - Fri, 2015-07-24 14:23

So, what happened???.... The FreeScholar in me got really tired of hearing developers that are excited about some proprietary solutions/tools that happen to work with Drupal. Some of these solutions are being touted as the way to go in the future. I believe that our community has no shortage of genius, creative minds and brilliant ideas, so I encourage us all to think deeply about the tools we use and our personal freedoms.

About 2 months ago, I invited Richard Stallman to our monthly meetup at MIT. I wanted him to meet the Drupal community and take a look at how we work together on projects that are dear to our hearts, helpful to our communities and good for society- we make things happen. He gave a short lightning talk about free software and hardware, then we had a Q and A with him. Many of us got a better understanding of what his mission is and how we can be a part of the educational outreach for fsf.org. Learning to explain how free software is key to autonomy, privacy and human rights, is a big help for the movement.

Next, I invited RMS to NYCcamp... On Saturday July 18th, he gave the keynote speech to a packed house at the United Nations - http://nyccamp.org/keynote/2015-keynote. After the keynote and standing ovation, he connected with the Aegir team and began a discussion on web hosting platforms and free server tools which led to a larger group convening at a strategy session with the Aegir team lead, Chris Gervais and RMS. They led an engaging round table discussion with about 30 people - http://nyccamp.org/session/aegir-strategy-session-richard-stallman-and-c...

What an excellent time - your voice and thoughts are needed, let's free our future with free software as the foundation.

I love Drupal almost as much as I love freedom.

Categories: FLOSS Project Planets

Red Crackle: Drupal Commerce Tutorial - Create your first e-commerce store

Planet Drupal - Fri, 2015-07-24 14:07
In this series of tutorials, you will learn how to create a Drupal Commerce site from scratch. You will learn how individual modules in Drupal Commerce suite fit together to build an e-commerce store, irrespective of whether you are selling products, services or subscriptions.
Categories: FLOSS Project Planets

Mediacurrent: Solr Integrations with Drupal Sarnia Module

Planet Drupal - Fri, 2015-07-24 13:52

Every day, companies and organizations with lots of content are weighing the pros and cons of adopting Drupal. Often, this decision takes the form of “to what extent should we adopt Drupal” - meaning whether an organization will want to move toward managing all, or possibly only some of its content in Drupal. Having chosen some form of the latter (as practical concerns often warrant), organizations and their technical teams must delve into the territory of integrating Drupal with third party or sometimes proprietary data sources.

Categories: FLOSS Project Planets

Blink Reaction: My First Drupal Commit - Part One

Planet Drupal - Fri, 2015-07-24 12:46
Contributing to Drupal from a Junior Developer’s Perspective

Introduction 

Here at FFW, we are acutely aware that Drupal is an open-source environment, and as such, we appreciate the many thousands of hours that volunteers have put into its development. So, when developers at FFW are between projects, we are encouraged to do "contrib" work, meaning we find open issues in the Drupal issue queue, solve them, and get them pushed out into the community. Until very recently in my year at FFW I was on a single project for one of our largest clients. When I finished my engagement on that project, and before I started another one, I found myself with some free time and the opportunity to work on my first Drupal commit! This is a fantastic company culture and policy, everybody wins because of it, and I feel lucky to work here. At any given time, we always have someone doing contrib work, mainly with Drupal 8 core. It helps us learn as individuals, helps the presence and reputation of our company, and of course helps Drupal, which is the reason we’re all here, and the reason you’re reading this blog series.

That being said, this will be a post about how to contribute and the process involved. There will no (or very few) code examples. There are plenty of resources online for that. Rather, this is for the novice to intermediate Drupal developer who’s ready to give back to Drupal for the first time and doesn't quite know where to start.

The thing that's so great about open source software, and the way Drupal contrib in particular works, is that anyone can contribute, regardless of past experience. Take me for example, I've made a career of Drupal for the past five years, but have never given back until now. Shame on me! There's no certification you need in order to contribute, no permissions, just an account at drupal.org and a willingness to learn. And don't worry – like I did at first – you can't break anything. The contrib and approval process is sophisticated enough that only correct, community-approved patches will get committed. There's nothing to fear, so…

Let’s Get Started

First I'll summarize the steps you go through to contribute, then I'll dive into each one, pointing out tips and gotchas along the way. So, at its most basic level, contributing goes like this:

1.     Find an issue you would like to, and are able to, contribute to.

2.     Download the latest Drupal core to your local machine. I’ve been working on Drupal 8 core issues, so that's where we’ll start.

3.     Create a new branch, and download and apply patches that already exist for the issue, so you're working from the most recent version of the code.

4.     Complete your work locally.

5.     Create a patch and an interdiff (more on that later) and upload them to the issue.

6.     Await the automated testing results and recommendations or approval from the community.

7.     Repeat steps 4 through 6 until your work is approved and your patch is ready.

8.     Get a commit in Drupal core!

I know it sounds like a lot, but once you do it a few times it will become easier and faster. Put it this way: my first patch took me almost a day to complete. Now I can create and upload one in a few minutes. Like anything else, the more you do it the faster (and more confident) you get. And it is so worth it to learn this process. I can’t overstate how excited I was when I got my first commit into core! In Monday’s post I’ll get deeper into each step of this process.

DrupalBest PracticesDrupal PlanetDrupal TrainingLearning SeriesPost tags: DrupalContributeDrupal Community
Categories: FLOSS Project Planets

Drupal Watchdog: Managing Video Content in Drupal

Planet Drupal - Fri, 2015-07-24 12:06
Article

When faced with the task of managing videos in Drupal, the number of available solutions might seem overwhelming. Where should you store the videos? What is the difference between CDNs (content delivery networks), cloud storage services, and hosted video solutions? Which Drupal modules should you use with which service?

Drupal Modules

By using some of the most popular modules for video handling, you can quickly set up a reliable video solution:

  • Media module Although not specialized for video, this widely used module can be combined with others; some cloud services have their own modules integrated with the Media module, too.
  • MediaElement module The MediaElement module provides an HTML5 (or Flash fallback) player. With the MediaElement module you can stream video to mobile devices as well. The player can integrate with your responsive theme.
  • Video module The Video module can handle video upload, transcoding, and playing; generates thumbnails; and can deliver videos from cloud systems.
Content Delivery Networks

CDNs are largely distributed systems optimized for delivering content to end-users, over the Internet, with high availability and performance. For video content, they are often coupled with a transcoding server.
They can be expensive, but are a good choice for improving performance and delivering content for high-traffic websites. As the data centers are distributed, they will be faster than the usual hosting providers for most visitors to your site. Also, contemplate using a CDN if you already have a transcoding server.

The CDN module provides easy Content Delivery Network integration for Drupal sites. It alters file URLs so that files are downloaded from a CDN instead of your web server.

Cloud Storage Services

Cloud storage services aren’t optimized for delivering rich media content on high traffic sites, but can be a cheaper alternative to CDNs – if you don’t have a huge number of videos and your site traffic isn’t very high.

Categories: FLOSS Project Planets

PyCharm: Feature Spotlight: Creating and managing Django projects

Planet Python - Fri, 2015-07-24 12:04

Happy Friday everyone,

PyCharm is known for its superior support of the Django web framework. It’s been supported since the inception of PyCharm, and with each release we improve it by polishing the existing features and adding new ones.

With the latest PyCharm 4.5 release, we’ve improved Django 1.8 code insight and added a big new feature: the manage.py console.

This new tool introduces a new user interface and provides autocompletion for manage.py tasks and their arguments. The manage.py console also preserves the command history so you can easily fetch previous commands just by pressing Up / Down arrows. Quick documentation is also supported by pressing Ctrl+Q on a manage.py command.

Note: Django support is available only in PyCharm Professional Edition.

Given the number of big and small changes to Django support, recently we updated our main Creating and managing Django projects tutorial. Do check it out if you are migrating to PyCharm as a new development environment and want to get used to its basics. Or if you just want to revisit the whole picture of Django development with PyCharm.

Talk to you soon,
-Dmitry

Categories: FLOSS Project Planets

FSF News: FSF invites the free software community to its 30th birthday party on October 3rd, 2015

GNU Planet! - Fri, 2015-07-24 11:40

The event homepage is https://fsf.org/fsf30/celebration and the RSVP form is open. The FSF encourages use of the hashtag #FSF30 on social media (read the foundation's position on different social media platforms).

The FSF is also planning a mini-conference, also on October 3, during the day, where the free software community will share lessons from its first thirty years and plan for the future. The foundation may also hold a fundraising dinner on Friday, October 2nd.

Volunteer or Sponsor

The FSF is seeking volunteers to help set up the venue and greet guests. Individuals with skills in free software livestreaming are also needed. All volunteers will receive a special reverse birthday gift from the FSF.

The foundation is also seeking general event, beer, or food sponsors. To sponsor or recommend a sponsor, or to volunteer, contact campaigns@fsf.org.

Satellite events

Supporters around the world have already expressed interest in holding their own local events for the FSF's birthday. The foundation would be delighted to cover these events on its blog or come up with a creative way of connecting them to the event in Boston. Please contact campaigns@fsf.org if you are interested in organizing a satellite event.

Streaming

The FSF intends to livestream the event and post videos online afterwards. Volunteers with free software video skills are needed as well.

Read the New Yorker article, The GNU Manifesto Turns Thirty by Maria Bustillos.

About the Free Software Foundation

The Free Software Foundation, founded in 1985, is dedicated to promoting computer users' right to use, study, copy, modify, and redistribute computer programs. The FSF promotes the development and use of free (as in freedom) software -- particularly the GNU operating system and its GNU/Linux variants -- and free documentation for free software. The FSF also helps to spread awareness of the ethical and political issues of freedom in the use of software, and its Web sites, located at fsf.org and gnu.org, are an important source of information about GNU/Linux. Donations to support the FSF's work can be made at https://donate.fsf.org. Its headquarters are in Boston, MA, USA.

More information about the FSF, as well as important information for journalists and publishers, is at https://www.fsf.org/press.

Media Contacts

Georgia Young
Program Manager
Free Software Foundation
+1 (617) 542 5942
campaigns@fsf.org

Categories: FLOSS Project Planets

FSF Blogs: You're invited: 30th birthday party and mini-conference

GNU Planet! - Fri, 2015-07-24 11:20

Join the Free Software Foundation and friends in Boston, MA, USA on the evening of Saturday, October 3rd for our 30th Birthday Party. We'll share hors d'oeuvres, drinks, and an address by FSF founder and president Richard Stallman, as well as plenty of social time for catching up with old friends and making new ones.

RSVP now! If you want to brag about it on social media, use the hashtag #FSF30.

If the free software movement is coming together for a party, we might as well get some work done, too. We're planning a mini-conference for the day of October 3rd, before the party, where we'll share what we've learned from the first thirty years of the free software movement and swap ideas about the future. Stay tuned for more details about this, as well as a possible dinner on Friday night.

Bookmark the event homepage for lodging suggestions and more information about the mini-conference and other festivities that weekend, coming soon.

Not coming to Boston?

We've been flattered by supporters around the world asking to hold their own local events for the FSF's birthday. Of course! We'd even love to write about it, or come up with a creative way of connecting it to the event in Boston. Contact us at campaigns@fsf.org if you're interested.

We also intend to stream the event and post videos online afterwards.

Support our work for computer user freedom

Our supporters have made our thirty wonderful years possible. By becoming an associate member you'll help us achieve even more in the next thirty. Members also get special benefits, including gratis admission to our LibrePlanet conference each spring.

If you'd rather not become a member, you can also help by making a donation when you RSVP, or on our donation page.

Volunteer or sponsor

If you are interested in helping out at the mini-conference or the party, we welcome you! In addition to setting up the venue and greeting guests, we need people with skills in free software livestreaming. All volunteers will receive a special reverse birthday gift from us to you.

The FSF is also seeking general event, beer, or food sponsors. To sponsor or recommend a sponsor, or to volunteer, reply to this email.

Also, we'd like to introduce Georgia Young, our newest FSF staffer, in the role of program manager. Georgia is planning the thirtieth birthday events, so expect to hear more from her soon.

See you in October!

Read the New Yorker Article, The GNU Manifesto Turns Thirty by Maria Bustillos.

Categories: FLOSS Project Planets

You're invited: 30th birthday party and mini-conference

FSF Blogs - Fri, 2015-07-24 11:20

Join the Free Software Foundation and friends in Boston, MA, USA on the evening of Saturday, October 3rd for our 30th Birthday Party. We'll share hors d'oeuvres, drinks, and an address by FSF founder and president Richard Stallman, as well as plenty of social time for catching up with old friends and making new ones.

RSVP now! If you want to brag about it on social media, use the hashtag #FSF30.

If the free software movement is coming together for a party, we might as well get some work done, too. We're planning a mini-conference for the day of October 3rd, before the party, where we'll share what we've learned from the first thirty years of the free software movement and swap ideas about the future. Stay tuned for more details about this, as well as a possible dinner on Friday night.

Bookmark the event homepage for lodging suggestions and more information about the mini-conference and other festivities that weekend, coming soon.

Not coming to Boston?

We've been flattered by supporters around the world asking to hold their own local events for the FSF's birthday. Of course! We'd even love to write about it, or come up with a creative way of connecting it to the event in Boston. Contact us at campaigns@fsf.org if you're interested.

We also intend to stream the event and post videos online afterwards.

Support our work for computer user freedom

Our supporters have made our thirty wonderful years possible. By becoming an associate member you'll help us achieve even more in the next thirty. Members also get special benefits, including gratis admission to our LibrePlanet conference each spring.

If you'd rather not become a member, you can also help by making a donation when you RSVP, or on our donation page.

Volunteer or sponsor

If you are interested in helping out at the mini-conference or the party, we welcome you! In addition to setting up the venue and greeting guests, we need people with skills in free software livestreaming. All volunteers will receive a special reverse birthday gift from us to you.

The FSF is also seeking general event, beer, or food sponsors. To sponsor or recommend a sponsor, or to volunteer, reply to this email.

Also, we'd like to introduce Georgia Young, our newest FSF staffer, in the role of program manager. Georgia is planning the thirtieth birthday events, so expect to hear more from her soon.

See you in October!

Read the New Yorker Article, The GNU Manifesto Turns Thirty by Maria Bustillos.

Categories: FLOSS Project Planets
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