FLOSS Project Planets

Colin Watson: Moving on, but not too far

Planet Debian - Sun, 2014-10-26 17:55

The Ubuntu Code of Conduct says:

Step down considerately: When somebody leaves or disengages from the project, we ask that they do so in a way that minimises disruption to the project. They should tell people they are leaving and take the proper steps to ensure that others can pick up where they left off.

I've been working on Ubuntu for over ten years now, almost right from the very start; I'm Canonical's employee #17 due to working out a notice period in my previous job, but I was one of the founding group of developers. I occasionally tell the story that Mark originally hired me mainly to work on what later became Launchpad Bugs due to my experience maintaining the Debian bug tracking system, but then not long afterwards Jeff Waugh got in touch and said "hey Colin, would you mind just sorting out some installable CD images for us?". This is where you imagine one of those movie time-lapse clocks ... At some point it became fairly clear that I was working on Ubuntu, and the bug system work fell to other people. Then, when Matt Zimmerman could no longer manage the entire Ubuntu team in Canonical by himself, Scott James Remnant and I stepped up to help him out. I did that for a couple of years, starting the Foundations team in the process. As the team grew I found that my interests really lay in hands-on development rather than in management, so I switched over to being the technical lead for Foundations, and have made my home there ever since. Over the years this has given me the opportunity to do all sorts of things, particularly working on our installers and on the GRUB boot loader, leading the development work on many of our archive maintenance tools, instituting the +1 maintenance effort and proposed-migration, and developing the Click package manager, and I've had the great pleasure of working with many exceptionally talented people.

However. In recent months I've been feeling a general sense of malaise and what I've come to recognise with hindsight as the symptoms of approaching burnout. I've been working long hours for a long time, and while I can draw on a lot of experience by now, it's been getting harder to summon the enthusiasm and creativity to go with that. I have a wonderful wife, amazing children, and lovely friends, and I want to be able to spend a bit more time with them. After ten years doing the same kinds of things, I've accreted history with and responsibility for a lot of projects. One of the things I always loved about Foundations was that it's a broad church, covering a wide range of software and with a correspondingly wide range of opportunities; but, over time, this has made it difficult for me to focus on things that are important because there are so many areas where I might be called upon to help. I thought about simply stepping down from the technical lead position and remaining in the same team, but I decided that that wouldn't make enough of a difference to what matters to me. I need a clean break and an opportunity to reset my habits before I burn out for real.

One of the things that has consistently held my interest through all of this has been making sure that the infrastructure for Ubuntu keeps running reliably and that other developers can work efficiently. As part of this, I've been able to do a lot of work over the years on Launchpad where it was a good fit with my remit: this has included significant performance improvements to archive publishing, moving most archive administration operations from excessively-privileged command-line operations to the webservice, making build cancellation reliable across the board, and moving live filesystem building from an unscalable ad-hoc collection of machines into the Launchpad build farm. The Launchpad development team has generally welcomed help with open arms, and in fact I joined the ~launchpad team last year.

So, the logical next step for me is to make this informal involvement permanent. As such, at the end of this year I will be moving from Ubuntu Foundations to the Launchpad engineering team.

This doesn't mean me leaving Ubuntu. Within Canonical, Launchpad development is currently organised under the Continuous Integration team, which is part of Ubuntu Engineering. I'll still be around in more or less the usual places and available for people to ask me questions. But I will in general be trying to reduce my involvement in Ubuntu proper to things that are closely related to the operation of Launchpad, and a small number of low-effort things that I'm interested enough in to find free time for them. I still need to sort out a lot of details, but it'll very likely involve me handing over project leadership of Click, drastically reducing my involvement in the installer, and looking for at least some help with boot loader work, among others. I don't expect my Debian involvement to change, and I may well find myself more motivated there now that it won't be so closely linked with my day job, although it's possible that I will pare some things back that I was mostly doing on Ubuntu's behalf. If you ask me for help with something over the next few months, expect me to be more likely to direct you to other people or suggest ways you can help yourself out, so that I can start disentangling myself from my current web of projects.

Please contact me sooner or later if you're interested in helping out with any of the things I'm visible in right now, and we can see what makes sense. I'm looking forward to this!

Categories: FLOSS Project Planets

Gregor Herrmann: RC bugs 2014/38-43

Planet Debian - Sun, 2014-10-26 17:47

it's this time of the year^Wrelease cycle again – almost. in ten days (& roughly two hours), the freeze for the next debian release, codenamed jessie, will start. by this time packages must be in testing in order to be candidates for the release, as explained in the release team's detailed freeze policy. this also means, with the regular testing migration time set to ten days, that tonight's dinstall run closed the regular upload window.

& this also means that we should all concentrate on fixing RC bugs to make the freeze as short as possible & jessie yet another great release. before I head over to the UDD bugs page, I'd like to summarize my work on RC bugs in the last weeks, which was again focussed on packages in the Debian Perl Group.

  • #736739 – src:lemonldap-ng: "[src:lemonldap-ng] Sourceless file"
    upload new upstream release prepared by Xavier Guimard (pkg-perl)
  • #736807 – src:lemonldap-ng: "[src:lemonldap-ng] Non free file"
    upload new upstream release prepared by Xavier Guimard (pkg-perl)
  • #742409 – libsereal-encoder-perl: "libsereal-encoder-perl: FTBFS on some architectures"
    upload new upstream release, with patch from ntyni (pkg-perl)
  • #755317 – src:libnet-bonjour-perl: "libnet-bonjour-perl: FTBFS: Tests failures"
    lower severity (pkg-perl)
  • #755328 – src:libgraph-writer-graphviz-perl: "libgraph-writer-graphviz-perl: FTBFS: Tests failures"
    update patches for test suite (pkg-perl)
  • #759966 – src:libvideo-fourcc-info-perl: "libvideo-fourcc-info-perl: FTBFS: dh_auto_test: perl Build test returned exit code 255"
    close bug, fixed in #762334 (pkg-perl)
  • #762333 – libcgi-application-plugin-ajaxupload-perl: "libcgi-application-plugin-ajaxupload-perl: FTBFS with libjson-any-perl 1.36-1: test failures"
    close, as the bug is fixed in libpackage-stash-perl, cf. #762334 (pkg-perl)
  • #763254 – src:libcrypt-gcrypt-perl: "libcrypt-gcrypt-perl: FTBFS: GCrypt.xs:59:5: error: unknown type name 'gcry_ac_handle_t'"
    add patch from CPAN RT (pkg-perl)
  • #765053 – libapache-dbilogger-perl: "libapache-dbilogger-perl: FTBFS - undefined symbol: modperl_is_running"
    close, as the bug is fixed in libapache2-mod-perl2, cf. #765174 (pkg-perl)
  • #765137 – src:libcgi-fast-perl: "libcgi-fast-perl: FTBFS: Tests failures"
    upload new upstream release (pkg-perl)
  • #765150 – src:libhtml-formfu-perl: "libhtml-formfu-perl: FTBFS: Tests failures"
    lower severity (pkg-perl)
  • #765165 – liblog-dispatch-perl: "liblog-dispatch-perl: missing dependency/recommendation on libdevel-globaldestruction-perl"
    add missing (build) dependency (pkg-perl)
Categories: FLOSS Project Planets

KDE makes Qt

Planet KDE - Sun, 2014-10-26 17:36

Recently I was trying some statistics on the qtbase-module (where QtCore, QtGui, QtWidgets and so on lives) and was wondering who made them.
Not based on their current paid affilation, like Thiago’s graphs, but if each commit was made by a person coming from KDE.

So, I got hold of Thiago’s scripts, a lovely mix of perl and zsh, and a QtBase git repository. First steps was to try to classify people as person coming from KDE or not. Of course, I’m a KDE person. Thiago is a KDE person. David Faure is a KDE person. Olivier Goffart is a KDE person. Lars Knoll is a KDE person.

By the help of the KDE accounts file, and some of the long time KDE contributors, I got after a half day of work a good list of it. Then next steps was trying to put it into Thiago’s perlscripts

All of it kind of succeeded:

So, KDE people makes up for 40-60% of the weekly commits to QtBase. This is again shows that KDE is important to Qt, just as the reverse is. So, let’s keep KDE healthy.

KDE is running a end-of-year fundraiser over here https://www.kde.org/fundraisers/yearend2014/. Go ahead and donate, and help KDE stay healthy. For your own sake. And for Qt’s.

Categories: FLOSS Project Planets

Sune Vuorela: KDE makes Qt

Planet Debian - Sun, 2014-10-26 17:36

Recently I was trying some statistics on the qtbase-module (where QtCore, QtGui, QtWidgets and so on lives) and was wondering who made them.
Not based on their current paid affilation, like Thiago’s graphs, but if each commit was made by a person coming from KDE.

So, I got hold of Thiago’s scripts, a lovely mix of perl and zsh, and a QtBase git repository. First steps was to try to classify people as person coming from KDE or not. Of course, I’m a KDE person. Thiago is a KDE person. David Faure is a KDE person. Olivier Goffart is a KDE person. Lars Knoll is a KDE person.

By the help of the KDE accounts file, and some of the long time KDE contributors, I got after a half day of work a good list of it. Then next steps was trying to put it into Thiago’s perlscripts

All of it kind of succeeded:

So, KDE people makes up for 40-60% of the weekly commits to QtBase. This is again shows that KDE is important to Qt, just as the reverse is. So, let’s keep KDE healthy.

KDE is running a end-of-year fundraiser over here https://www.kde.org/fundraisers/yearend2014/. Go ahead and donate, and help KDE stay healthy. For your own sake. And for Qt’s.

Categories: FLOSS Project Planets

FOSDEM 2015 Desktops DevRoom Call for Talks

Planet KDE - Sun, 2014-10-26 16:38

FOSDEM is one of the largest gatherings of Free Software contributors in the world and happens each February in Brussels (Belgium). One of the tracks will be the Desktops DevRoom (formerly known as “CrossDesktop DevRoom”), which will host Desktop-related talks.

We are now inviting proposals for talks about Free/Libre/Open-source Software on the topics of Desktop development, Desktop applications and interoperability amongst Desktop Environments. This is a unique opportunity to show novel ideas and developments to a wide technical audience.

Topics accepted include, but are not limited to: Enlightenment, Gnome, KDE, Unity, XFCE, LXQt, Windows, Mac OS X, software development for the desktop, general desktop matters, applications that enhance desktops and web (when related to desktop).

Talks can be very specific, such as the advantages/disadvantages of development with Qt on Wayland over X11/Mir; or as general as predictions for the fusion of Desktop and web in 5 years time. Topics that are of interest to the users and developers of all desktop environments are especially welcome. The FOSDEM 2014 schedule might give you some inspiration.

Please include the following information when submitting a proposal:

  • Your name
  • The title of your talk (please be descriptive, as titles will be listed with around 250 from other projects)
  • Short abstract of one or two paragraphs
  • Short bio (with photo)
  • Requested time: from 15 to 45 minutes. Normal duration is 30 minutes. Longer duration requests must be properly justified. You may be assigned LESS time than you request.

The deadline for submissions is December 7th 2014. FOSDEM will be held on the weekend of January 31st-February 1st 2015 and the Desktops DevRoom will take place on Sunday, February 1st 2015. Please use the following website to submit your proposals: https://penta.fosdem.org/submission/FOSDEM15 (you do not need to create a new Pentabarf account if you already have one from past years).

You can also join the devroom’s mailing list, which is the official communication channel for the DevRoom: desktops-devroom@lists.fosdem.org (subscription page for the mailing list)

– The Desktops DevRoom 2015 Organization Team

Categories: FLOSS Project Planets

Pau Garcia i Quiles: FOSDEM 2015 Desktops DevRoom Call for Talks

Planet Debian - Sun, 2014-10-26 16:38

FOSDEM is one of the largest gatherings of Free Software contributors in the world and happens each February in Brussels (Belgium). One of the tracks will be the Desktops DevRoom (formerly known as “CrossDesktop DevRoom”), which will host Desktop-related talks.

We are now inviting proposals for talks about Free/Libre/Open-source Software on the topics of Desktop development, Desktop applications and interoperability amongst Desktop Environments. This is a unique opportunity to show novel ideas and developments to a wide technical audience.

Topics accepted include, but are not limited to: Enlightenment, Gnome, KDE, Unity, XFCE, LXQt, Windows, Mac OS X, software development for the desktop, general desktop matters, applications that enhance desktops and web (when related to desktop).

Talks can be very specific, such as the advantages/disadvantages of development with Qt on Wayland over X11/Mir; or as general as predictions for the fusion of Desktop and web in 5 years time. Topics that are of interest to the users and developers of all desktop environments are especially welcome. The FOSDEM 2014 schedule might give you some inspiration.

Please include the following information when submitting a proposal:

  • Your name
  • The title of your talk (please be descriptive, as titles will be listed with around 250 from other projects)
  • Short abstract of one or two paragraphs
  • Short bio (with photo)
  • Requested time: from 15 to 45 minutes. Normal duration is 30 minutes. Longer duration requests must be properly justified. You may be assigned LESS time than you request.

The deadline for submissions is December 7th 2014. FOSDEM will be held on the weekend of January 31st-February 1st 2015 and the Desktops DevRoom will take place on Sunday, February 1st 2015. Please use the following website to submit your proposals: https://penta.fosdem.org/submission/FOSDEM15 (you do not need to create a new Pentabarf account if you already have one from past years).

You can also join the devroom’s mailing list, which is the official communication channel for the DevRoom: desktops-devroom@lists.fosdem.org (subscription page for the mailing list)

– The Desktops DevRoom 2015 Organization Team

Categories: FLOSS Project Planets

Russ Allbery: California general election

Planet Debian - Sun, 2014-10-26 16:20

Probably only of interest to California residents.

Time again for the general election voting. This is probably too late to be helpful for a lot of people voting permanent absentee, but may as well write this down anyway. (Hm, I apparently didn't do this in 2012.)

Propositions:

Proposition 1: YES. Now is one of the best times in history to borrow money for infrastructure improvements, and our water infrastructure in the state can certainly use it.

Proposition 2: YES. I have somewhat mixed feelings about this, since I hate passing complex legislation like this via proposition, but this already went through the legislature. It would be dumb for the federal government, which can more easily borrow money, but given how the finances of state governments work in the US, this sort of rainy day fund is probably prudent. This one seems reasonably well-designed, and the opposition is panic about a secondary effect on how school reserves are managed that can be changed with later legislative action and which is rather unconvincing.

Proposition 45: YES. I can't get very enthused about yet more bandaids on top of our completely broken health care system, but forcing insurance companies to justify rate increases results in some public pressure against profit-taking by insurance companies. Single payer is what we actually need, but this might be mildly helpful. Plus, the argument against is more incoherent nonsense. So, I'm voting yes, but I don't think it's important and I won't mind if it loses.

Proposition 46: NO. There are a lot of things that we should do about preventable medical errors, starting with funding our health care system properly, testing drugs properly, and investing in proper inspections and medical licensing investigations. Drug testing doctors is not among those things. This is a well-meaning but horrible idea pushed by a victim's advocacy group that won't do anything to improve our health care system. The fear-mongering of the opponents about malpractice lawsuits is a bit much, but there are essentially no positive benefits here.

Proposition 47: YES. Requires that misdemeanor crimes actually be misdemeanors, rather than giving prosecutors discretion to charge them as felonies if the person charged happens to be black-- er, I mean, if the prosecutor doesn't like them for some reason. Obviously a good idea on all fronts: stop over-charging crimes, stop giving prosecutors discretion to choose the impact of laws on particular people (since they rarely use it appropriately), and further try to decriminalize our completely worthless "war on drugs."

Proposition 48: YES. I'm opposed to the Indian gaming system in general, but this proposition appears to be a rather cynical attempt to block new casino development by tribes that already have casinos. My general feeling is that if we're going to have casinos, they should generally be legal; the bizarre system where each casino is subject to public approval seems designed to create political cronyism.

State offices:

I'm not going to comment on the partisan offices, since no one interesting survived the primaries. Across the board, it's basically the Democratic incumbants against various Republicans. The state Republican party in California is dominated by science denialists, Randian objectivists, and people who think the solution to all problems is ensuring rich people don't pay taxes, so it takes rather a lot to get me to vote for any of them. At the moment, the Democrats are doing a reasonably good job running the state, so while I'd vote for challengers from the left against several of them, given the boring candidate slate, I'm just voting Democrat down the line.

California has a system that requires voter approval for various state judicial offices. In general, I don't agree with voter approval for judges, since voters are rarely in a position to make reasonable choices about justices. Since there's a Democratic administration in power at the moment, these are probably the best judges that we're going to get (the few I've heard of are good choices), and I don't think the yes/no approval voting is useful anyway. So I'm voting to approve across the board.

Superintendent of Public Instruction: Tom Torlakson. I'm not a huge fan of Torlakson, but Tuck is a Harvard MBA who ran charter schools and then a school privatization initiative. Everyone always claims that they want to reduce bureaucracy and empower teachers, but Tuck has a past track record of trying to do so by taking public education private, something that I am passionately opposed to. So Torlakson it is.

Local measures:

Measure B: YES. Increases the local hotel tax and uses it for local infrastructure. I'm generally in favor of raising taxes, and the amount certainly won't be significant in the ridiculous Palo Alto hotel market. The arguments against feature one of my favorite stupid right-wing talking points: the tax is unfair because it isn't earmarked to benefit the people paying it.

Measure C: YES. Reasonable, small reform of the local utility tax, opposed by the Libertarian Party and "taxpayer associations" using an "all taxation is theft" argument. What's not to like?

Measure D: NO. Reduces the size of the city council for no clear reason. The stated reasons are saving money (not credible given how little money is involved) and making city meetings not take as long. I'm going to need something better than that to vote for this.

Local offices:

Judge of the Superior Court, Office #24: Matthew S. Harris. I'm making one exception for my normal rule against voting for former prosecutors for judges because the incumbant, Diane Ritchie, is apparently a train wreck. All it takes is a quick Google search to reveal multiple news stories about strange behavior, clear conflicts of interest, and other serious problems, including a rebuke by the local bar association. Even if not all of that information is true, judges should be above reproach, or at least farther above reproach than this.

Palo Alto City Council: I have an agenda here: I think housing density is about the best thing that the local community could support. Housing density enables better mass transit options, makes housing more affordable and brings more housing under possible rent control, and simply makes more sense given the cost of housing in the area. A lot of the city council members run on low-density or anti-growth platforms; I vote against those and for people who support development. And, of course, I'll filter out candidates who believe stupid things, like claiming a minimum wage is un-American (Seelam-Sea Reddy). The best seem to be Greg Scharff, A.C. Johnston, Nancy Shepherd, Cory Wolbach, and Wayne Douglass.

Palo Alto Unified School District: The Democratic party has endorsed four out of the five candidates, so it probably doesn't matter too much. Gina Dalma and Ken Dauber sound like the best of the candidates to me, so I will probably vote for them.

Santa Clara Valley Water District #7: I voted for Brian Schmidt last time, and I don't see a reason to change my mind. His opponent is a Silicon Valley millionaire who is spending a surprisingly large amount of money on this race and is involved with a business that sells software to water boards, which raises some eyebrows.

Categories: FLOSS Project Planets

Pulley, site to sell your downloadable stuff

LinuxPlanet - Sun, 2014-10-26 15:35

By Vasudev Ram


Pulley (pulleyapp.com) is a site that allows you to sell your downloadable stuff of any kind. It seems to be something like Gumroad.

I got to know about Pulley via an email newsletter that I get.

From the home page of the Pulley site:

[ Pulley is a simple way to sell your digital art, music, videos, photography, fonts, eBooks, software, and other downloadable products. ]

They have a 14-day free trial (*). Their plans start from $6 per month and can be seen here.

(*) To use the free trial, you have to sign up for one of the paid trials, and then cancel withing 14 days if you don't want to pay and continue using the service. The site says that no credit card is required to sign up.

- Vasudev Ram - Dancing Bison Enterprises

Click here to signup for email about new products from Vasudev Ram.

Contact Page

Share | var addthis_config = {"data_track_clickback":true};
Vasudev Ram

Categories: FLOSS Project Planets

Color Pickers

Planet KDE - Sun, 2014-10-26 15:25

Hello there!

It sure has been a while since the last post that I shared. A lot has gone through but all for a good cause. KDE design team is maturing and keeping the conversation alive in the forums. This is really good, now we are moving to more specific ideas on design now that the main widget style is done. We have worked hard on offering guidelines and ideas to other developers that might want to apply the principles that the team is coming up with. This has led us to work more closely with developers. Many of them are very enthusiastic about the work that we do.

In this regard, I offered to propose a new way or method that we can use for the KDE Color picker. We have a few ways that this was done in the past and maybe it can be improved. KDE currently uses this from the KColor Chooser

 

I like the way that this works, depending on the color you choose on the left and vertical bar you can save, enter values, choose different palettes. However, this is not the “only” color chooser/picker out there. We can examine a few more to get an idea where UI design has taken the color picker in other platforms.

OSX: It has a few color choosing modes at the top, a dropper in the shape of a magnifying glass and also an extensible custom color saving area. You get value numbers but through the rest of the modules. A cool feature is the ability to pick out a color with the dropper from anywhere on the screen independently from the application you are in. A limitation that other color pickers have.

Windows: Sorry to post this here, but it has to be mentioned. It must be said that they don’t dive into color a lot. Their pickers are generally very stripped down. Win 8, for example offers this for  their theme selection. It is a very simple one, with pre-selected colors in the squares above, you have to just slide the knob to what shade you want and the system will give you a more targeted selection above.

Beyond working with a native OS color picker, there are many others that people use. I personally like using Adobe products that generally show a color picker that is a bit more complex to learn. It is not the same behavior across all their applications but it is something that can be learned. I also use color pickers that work with swatches. I feel that you can simplify your work so much more through the use of swatches. Inkscape, GIMP, the Adobe Creative suite and many others all use swatches. It is only natural, especially when you have commissioned design work that must stick to certain colors and you don’t want to enter each element’s color manually every time. But enough about me. Let’s take a sample case in which a casual user might want to take advantage of the color picker.

“BOB” works on the computer regularly, emails, browses the internet and has recently become adept at editing images for fun. He has been through a few family albums and this has also led him to work closely with color. Bob is by no means a power user, but likes configurability, simplicity and extensibility. Current color picker options have given Bob the ability to use the color wheel with all the pixels that can be represented on the screen in a 64 bit machine. He has been given a selection bar for the color family he is looking to work with and an area to enter his precise values as well as another area where to save them. He has not been given a universal swatch option or ways that he can bring in new swatches or palettes from the internet or even a method to publish the new ones he has created. But Bob has not really thought of the use that his creations could make so he doesn’t really feel the need to contribute his creations. He is happy where he is at and the color picker appears to be more than enough for what he uses it. Yet, there does not seem to be extensibility in this picker. Bob has used a few operating systems and apps that offer color selection and they all show similar conventions.

As we examine the case, I would say that the color picker generally feels that way. Like a tool that you adapt yourself to and generally does not feature a lot of extensibility. Its UI can’t be tweaked. But the variety in organization is different depending on the system.

In general, color pickers feature 4 areas for your work.

  1. Color wheel
  2. Color shade vertical bar (very few times horizontal)
  3. Color Saving area
  4. Color value entries

My perception is that these could fit Bob if they had these elements. But Bob has not thought of the extensibility features that could be introduced to the interface. I believe that as being part of an interconnected world, our color selections can be shared and appreciated by others. Adding a social element to the color picker would be great. Bob could for example, do a simple online search (from within the color picker) to choose color palettes or swatches that he might need for his next photo project. He might also discover new swatches that are exactly what he is looking for in the next composition. Maybe a friend of his has posted a new swatch at a central location from where Bob’s friend shares his creations.

Another cool idea would be to have the ability to rearrange the color picker as best you think. You don’t have to worry about pre-determined organizations that don’t match your workflow. Just like Dolphin is able to move bars and sections to different arrangements, this could also be possible with the picker. That way, you don’t conform or find the UI limitations that may be always present as you try to expand your color picking experience.

So, here is my idea

First, provide a central area and default arrangement where color is chosen

Or you can just decide to change all that and create something like this

 

Next, we need to think of how to show or present the social area. Given the space constraints and the way that you may want to develop your color picker begs the designer to simplify and abstract this particular area.

Here the idea is to be able to create your own swatches through the saving tool (it would need to feature an element to create the swatch) and later drag them into the social area for you to seamlessly share them with other users. You have a plus and minus button area where you can bring in new swatches from the internet and also a little element to show how popular or loved a certain swatch is.

Now, I presented this idea here is very simple terms and results so that we can think outside the box for how to keep core new ideas and update the design for the color picker.

Categories: FLOSS Project Planets

Ben Armstrong: Eleventh hour upload of tuxpaint

Planet Debian - Sun, 2014-10-26 14:51

I have just made an eleventh hour upload of tuxpaint, tuxpaint-config and tuxpaint-stamps. With luck, this will make it in time for the Nov. 5 Jessie freeze deadline so it goes in as an unassisted migration. Coming soon to a mirror near you!

Categories: FLOSS Project Planets

Martin Fitzpatrick: Pathomx v3.0.2 released

Planet Python - Sun, 2014-10-26 14:03

Pathomx v3.0.2 has been released for both Windows and MacOS X. This marks the first stable, bug-fixed release for the v3.0 line featuring the new IPython-kernel with cluster support for parallel processing of tools.

This latest version adds a number of important features over the previous v2.0 series:

  • IPython backend including a live in-process kernel for debugging and data exploration
  • Pandas dataframe-based data handling
  • Inline code editor: edit the Python code for any tool
  • Figure-based data selection, select regions to exclude from spectra directly on the view output
  • Fully functional python implementation of the icoshift algorithm for NMR (+ other spectra) alignment
  • Support for custom tools, write your own scripts to process your data and connect them up
  • Fixes for PCA and PLS-DA tools, scatter plots to show sample numbers
  • New tools for hierarchical clustering based on Christopher DeBoever’s code
  • Improved data importing in both the Text/CSV and Bruker (NMR) tools
  • BioCyc database web API and cached database included
  • Python, MATLAB, R scripting from within Pathomx

The IPython backend gets us all the benefits, bug fixes and improvements from that project directly into Pathomx (currently using the 3.0.0-dev branch). Similarly data handling is now performed (by default) using the Python data analysis library Pandas.

Future
  • Suport for remote cluster processing (to enable jobs to be run on a different computer to that running Pathomx)
  • BioCyc API support for both the web and Pathway Tools API through single interface
  • Improved generic database API to handle management of BioCyc and other data sources
  • More tools, including support for most classification approaches in the sci-kit learn library
Installation and getting started

You can download Pathomx v3.0.2 here. Full documentation is available and there is also a quick getting started guide to teach you the main principles of the software.

Feedback and bug-reports are always welcome.

Categories: FLOSS Project Planets

Bryan Pendleton: And some software engineering things, too

Planet Apache - Sun, 2014-10-26 12:28

Because, you know, that's just who I am.

  • FIT : Failure Injection TestingSimulating failure starts when the FIT service pushes failure simulation metadata to Zuul. Requests matching the failure scope at Zuul are decorated with failure. This may be an added delay to a service call, or failure in reaching the persistence layer. Each injection point touched checks the request context to determine if there is a failure for that specific component. If found, the injection point simulates that failure appropriately. Below is an outline of a simulated failure, demonstrating some of the inflection points in which failure can be injected.
  • Ice Cream and Distributed SystemsMary, Mom and Dad sat down and tried to figure out how to all agree on the problem with the fewest number of messages. Mary invented a simple scheme: when I asked her if I could have some ice cream, she messaged both my mom and dad and ask for their opinion, while asking that they didn't change their opinion until hearing back from her. If they both agreed, she'd go ahead and let them know she was going to serve dessert. If either said no, she let them know that the bowl would remain empty. The protocol, which they called two-phase commit after the frozen and liquid phases of ice cream, took four messages to complete.
  • Cuckoo FiltersIf you're going to use multiple choice hashing schemes, though, you should think about using cuckoo hashing. The ability to move keys around means you should get better space utilization; for example, even with 2 choices, if your buckets can hold 4 items, cuckoo hashing can get you about 95% space utilization. The problem with cuckoo hashing in this setting is that, for a Bloom filter, you want to just keep fingerprints of keys, not the keys themselves. So, when you want to move the key, how do you figure out where to move it to -- you no longer have the key to hash?
  • Instant Loading for Main Memory DatabasesWhile hardware limitations for fast loading have disappeared, current approaches for main memory databases fail to saturate the now available wire speeds of tens of Gbit / s. With Instant Loading, we contribute a novel CSV loading approach that allows scalable bulk loading at wire speed. This is achieved by optimizing all phases of loading for modern super-scalar multi-core CPUs.
  • Message Systems in Programming: Callbacks, Events, Pub Sub, Promises, and StreamsMessaging systems are used to communicate in larger code bases by helping decouple classes that need to know about changes or happenings in certain areas of the code . One of Object Oriented Programming‘s core concepts is encapsulation. How you decide to allow objects to talk to each other has pro’s and con’s for each method and it’s good to know your options as you can use many together in effective hybrid approaches.

    This article will cover the 5 common ones you’ll often encounter.

  • Amazon Kinesis and Apache Storm: Building a Real-Time Sliding-Window Dashboard over Streaming DataIn this whitepaper, we propose a reference architecture for ingesting, analyzing, and processing vast amounts of clickstream data generated at very high rates in a smart and cost-efficient way using Amazon Kinesis with Apache Storm. We also explore the use of Amazon ElastiCache (Redis) as an in-memory data store for aggregated counters and use of its Pub/Sub facility to publish the counters on a simple dashboard.
  • Avoiding the tragedy of the anticommons In his white paper for the Bio-Commons, Rüdiger Trojok writes about a significantly more ambitious vision for open biology: a bio-commons that holds biological intellectual property in trust for the good of all. He also articulates the tragedy of the anticommons, the nightmarish opposite of a bio-commons in which progress is difficult or impossible because “ambiguous and competing intellectual property claims…deter sharing and weaken investment incentives.” Each individual piece of intellectual property is carefully groomed and preserved, but it’s impossible to combine the elements; it’s like a jigsaw puzzle, in which every piece is locked in a separate safe.
  • Which Online Discussion Archetype Are You?What Mike created is a brilliant deconstruction of the various archetypes you'll encounter in any long running discussion group
  • 10 Tricks to Appear Smart During MeetingsOpinions and data and milestones are being thrown around and you don’t know your CTA from your OTA. This is a great point to go, “Guys, guys, guys, can we take a step back here?” Everyone will turn their heads toward you, amazed at your ability to silence the fray. Follow it up with a quick, “What problem are we really trying to solve?” and, boom! You’ve bought yourself another hour of looking smart.
  • 15 Tricks to Appear Smart in EmailsWhenever something good happens, always be the first to respond and always reply all. This will make you seem like a highly engaged team player.
Categories: FLOSS Project Planets

Francesco Chicchiricco: The Open (Source) Identity Stack

Planet Apache - Sun, 2014-10-26 12:07
Working on IAM you might have heard of the "Open Identity Stack": here's some Open Source alternatives
Categories: FLOSS Project Planets

Bryan Pendleton: Completely non-software-engineering things I'm reading

Planet Apache - Sun, 2014-10-26 12:00

It rained a little bit yesterday. Nothing like it's been raining in Oregon and Washington, but maybe it's a start. I can see from the chart that Lake Shasta is still falling, but yesterday, for the first day in a long time, inflow exceeded outflow.

  • The Astonishing Story of the Federal Reserve on 9-11I had planned to spend this week on the thrilling topic of the discount window. It was plain old curiosity that took me to the internet to find out what the Federal Reserve did on 9-11. As it turns out, it was not an easy story to unravel and between late Sunday night when I first started reading and Tuesday night when I started writing I read several hundred pages of reports as well as the tiny amount of media reporting available. Here’s the thing I didn’t know and I’ll bet you a wheelbarrow of carrots you didn’t either, on 9-11 and the days which immediately followed, a relatively small number of people did some genuinely, physically heroic things in order to keep the economy from going off the rails and none of them were named Alan Greenspan.
  • “Mount Thoreau” and the naming of things in the wilderness.And across Piute Canyon from it there stands another big peak, unnamed. On the maps it’s marked 12,691. If named after Thoreau, the two peaks would then form a gateway, like Scylla and Charybdis, through which hundreds of hikers would pass every year. Peak 12,691 is somewhat lower than Mount Emerson, but much more gnarly and interesting; the two peaks have much the same relationship that Emerson and Thoreau had, not just in size and aspect but in position, being close to each other but separated by a huge gulf of air. It was just like that in Concord.
  • Expert Critique of Burmese Cat ProjectHowever, keeping a colony of 40 cats is a vastly different proposition from keeping two or three cats in a home environment. With such a large colony, it is vitally important from a health perspective that cats are kept in a fresh, breezy environment at all times. I indicated that the solution would be to build an enclosure that surrounded Heritage House from water level to tree top and a shade cloth roof to provide some shade and protection from the rain.
  • Starship Size Comparison ChartScale: 1 pixel = 10 meters
  • How Rebounds WorkMuch has been made about the player-tracking revolution in the NBA and how it will advance the state of basketball analytics. This is truly a brave new world; to date, a vast majority of the energy spent researching advancements has been aimed at developing richer characterizations of player performance and constructing newfangled scouting reports. That makes sense, but basketball is bigger than any one player or team, and it’s also important to realize that the same data set that tells us Chandler Parsons and Jimmy Butler ran a lot, or Patty Mills runs the fastest, also holds incredible information about how basketball works. This goes beyond properly evaluating individuals; we are on our way to being able to map basketball itself. This work will eventually help coaches, players, and press more elegantly understand ball movement, defensive positioning, offensive architecture, and, yes, rebounding.
  • What A Former Olympian And NFL Player Can Teach Us About Advertising And Marketing I’ve seen firsthand in football and business how victims can bring down the morale of an entire team. It’s impossible to build anything with a victim mentality.
  • FORGET VIDEO GAMES: Here's What It's Like To Put On A Costume And Go Live-Action Role PlayingLive-action role-playing (or LARPing) was born on the fringes of American pop culture, a descendant of much-maligned hobbies like Dungeons and Dragons and other table games.

    In LARPing, players spend their weekend dressing up in costumes, adopting elaborate personae, and inhabiting a complex imagined world.

I don't have a Halloween costume this year. Maybe I'll go as Programmer of a Certain Age.

Categories: FLOSS Project Planets

It’s that TIME again!

Planet KDE - Sun, 2014-10-26 09:21

Twice a year i’m welcomed by a change in my time. Yes, it’s the stupid Daylight Saving Time. Or rather, it stops and kicks back in at the end of march.

In other terms: Summer time and Winter time. Why we – all of Europe – still even have this time weirdness is beyond me. I would kick summer time out and stay with winter time all year.

Since we don’t have one time yet, i’m stuck to fixing my clock twice a year. This time i saved the commands to do just that and share them with you.

All the commands below should be executed as root user!

First you need to sync your time using this command (you might need to install ntp or ntpdate):
ntpdate pool.ntp.org

This synchronizes your time. However, your hardware clock can still be wrong. Sync your new time to the hardware clock:
hwclock –systohc –localtime

That’s it.
Your time should work properly now. Both on linux and windows.

Categories: FLOSS Project Planets

Larry Garfield: On Drupal's Leadership

Planet Drupal - Sat, 2014-10-25 22:20

My DrupalCon Amsterdam Core Conversation on Managing Complexity has generated quite a bit of follow-up discussion. That's good; it's a conversation we as a community really need to be having.

There are a few points, though, that I feel bear clarification and further explanation as I fear the point of the talk has gotten lost in the details.

Before continuing, if you haven't yet I urge you to watch the session video as well as the background resources linked from the session page. This is not a new conversation; it's the latest chapter in a very long-running discussion that is larger than the Drupal project, and it behooves us all to be aware of the history and context around it.

read more

Categories: FLOSS Project Planets

Nick Kew: Traffic Server Summit (by ‘net)

Planet Apache - Sat, 2014-10-25 19:56

I spent two days last week at the trafficserver summit.

Or rather, two evenings.  The summit was held in Silicon Valley (hosted by linkedin), while I remained at home in Blighty with a conferencing link, making me one of several remote attendees.  With an 8 hour time difference, each day started at 5pm and went on into the wee hours.  On the first day (Tuesday) this followed a day of regular work.  On the Wednesday I took a more sensible approach and the only work I did before the summit was a bit of gardening.  Despite that I felt more tired on the Wednesday.

The conferencing link was a decent enough instance of its kind, with regular video alongside screen sharing and text (though IRC does a better job with text).  The video was pointed at the speakers as they presented, and the screen sharing was used to share their presentations.  That was good enough to follow the presentations pretty well: indeed, sometimes better than being there, as I could read all the intricate slides and screens that would’ve been just a blur if I’d been present in the room.

Unfortunately most of the presentations involved discussion around the room, and that was much harder, sometimes impossible, to follow.  Also, speaking was not a good experience: I heard my voice some time after I’d spoken, and it sounded ghastly and indistinct, so I muted my microphone.  That was using just the builtin mike in the macbook.  I tried later with a proper headset when I had something to contribute, but alas it seems by then I (and I think all remote attendees, after the initial difficulties) was muted by the system.  So I had something approximating to read-only access.  And of course missed out on the social aspects of the event away from the presentations.

In terms of the mechanics of running an event like this, I think in retrospect we could make some modest improvements.  We had good two-way communication over IRC, and that might be better-harnessed.  Maybe rather than ad-hoc intervention, someone present (a session chair?) could act as designated proxy for remote attendees, and keep an eye on IRC for anyone looking to contribute to discussion.  Having such a person would probably have prompted me into action on a few occasions when I had a comment, question or suggestion.  Or perhaps better, IRC could be projected onto a second screen in the room, alongside the presenter’s materials.

The speakers and contents were well worth the limitations and antisocial hours of attending.  I found a high proportion of the material interesting, informative, and well-presented.  Alan, who probably knows more than anyone about Trafficserver internals, spoke at length on a range of topics.  The duo of Brian and Bryan (no, not a comedy act) talked about debugging and led discussion on test frameworks.

Other speakers addressed applications and APIs, and deployments, ops and tools.  A session I found unexpectedly interesting was Susan on the subject of how, in integrating sophisticated SSL capabilities in a module, she’s been working with Alan to extend the API to meet her needs.  It’s an approach from which I might just benefit, and I also need to take a look at whether Ironbee adequately captures all potentially-useful information available from SSL.

At the end I also made (via IRC) one suggestion for a session for the next summit: API review.  There’s a lot that’s implemented in Trafficserver core and utils that could usefully be made available to plugins via the API, even just by installing existing header files to a public includes directory.  Obviously that requires some control over what is intended to be public, and a stability deal over exported APIs.  I have some thoughts over how to deal with those, but I think that’s a subject for the wiki rather than a blog post.  One little plea for now: let’s not get hung up on what’s in C vs C++.  Accept that exported headers might be either, and let application developers deal with it.  If anyone then feels compelled to write a ‘clean’ wrapper, welcome their contribution!

 


Categories: FLOSS Project Planets

Károly Négyesi: Drupal 8 critical issues office hours Oct 24, 2014

Planet Drupal - Sat, 2014-10-25 16:46

This was our first critical office hours. webflo have forward ported a Views SA (turned out that Twig autoescape made short work of the security hole -- yay! so now it's just a test) and even past the office hours followed up with a patch that now passes. I will monitor the issue further and make sure it gets reviewed and committed. ksenzee started on decoupling cache tags from cache bins -- there's no patch yet, I need to follow up on this one however from our discussion it was clear she was making a lot of progress. I was trying to help penyaskito with the language.settings config is not scalable issue but turned out his problems went away with a fresh install so that issue is now progressing well even without the office hours. So as far as I am concerned, that's two down and one moving (and as a bonus, webflo rerolled fix common HTML escaped render #key values due to Twig autoescape which is major I am not sure why it's not critical). I think critical issues office hours was off to a good start, more people would of course be better. I count 123 critical issues.

Categories: FLOSS Project Planets

Miriam Ruiz: Video game players and Gamers are different things

Planet Debian - Sat, 2014-10-25 16:41

Even though the Wikipedia defines “gamer” as “someone who partakes in interactive gaming, such as (predominantly) video games or board games”, this doesn’t really gets close to that term means socially at the moment. Going back to Wikipedia, we find that the video game subculture is “a form of new media subculture that has been influenced by video games”, so it might be quite accurate to define gamers as members of that subculture. You will find that most of the uses of the term “gamer” in the social networks and in the blogosphere refer to that. Please notice that, even though it is quite likely that most of the gamers play video games, the other way round does not need to be true and, in fact, it isn’t. Not everyone who plays video games belongs to the video game subculture, shares their point of view, their values and aesthetics, or even know about it. Kind of like what happens with the word “hacker”. Not everyone who hacks around with a computer belongs to the hacker subculture.

Mostly everyone who has access to the technology plays video games now. From babies and kids to grandparents. And people play them in every possible technological system around, not only on video game consoles or personal computers, but alse on mobile phones, tablets, web browsers. And many of those people who use different kind of technologies to play video games are not gamers. Not in the sense of belonging to the video game subculture. It is important to acknowledge that: that the video game subculture does not have the monopoly over video games or the video game developing industry anymore.

As you can imagine, all this rand doesn’t come from nowhere. During the last months, we have been witnessing a fight between some conservative core members of the video game subculture and people who want to bring some fresh air into the sociocultural elements of that subculture. Namely, that women shouldn’t be discriminated inside it. As every time that a women raises her voice to complain about anything in the Internet, they have been subjected to insults, attacks, rape and death threats, etc. I’m talking about something called #GamerGate, and even though I’m not going to get into it, I will provide some URLs in case someone might be interested. Please acknowledge that not all the points of view might be represented in this list (in fact, they are not, as I won’t be promoting in my blog things that I severely disagree with), so search the web for more information if you want to get that.

I’ve never been a gamer myself, meaning part of the subculture I mentioned. At some point I was probably closer tho the core values they had then than I am now. In any case, video games have already consolidated themselves as an important part of current culture, entertainment, education and socialization, and are definitely here to stay. That will probably mean that the percentage of gamers (members of the video game subculture) will become smaller. as the number of non-gamer video game players keeps raising.

Categories: FLOSS Project Planets

Presenting DWD, a Candidate for KDE Window Decorations

Planet KDE - Sat, 2014-10-25 15:11

When the first CSD “what if” was made in the KDE community forums it became the catalyst that got me in touch with some of the fine developers who really do make KDE happen, from them and members of the VDG I was educated on a new method of decorating windows with clean yet powerful widgets, and I have the privilege of presenting the idea we have worked and iterated on for some weeks now today;

Foreword

Client-Side Decorations (CSD) and Server-Side Decorations (SSD) are two methods for displaying the frames around our windows; and as history gets written it would be noted that KDE would back SSD, and Gnome would embrace CSD.

As a primer for those uninformed about what these two things are; lets begin by saying the window manager is the “server” and the applications are “clients”. “Server side decorations”, make the display server or window manager responsible for drawing the frame including window controls and title of the window. “Client side decorations” make the application is responsible for drawing its own frame. While the difference is subtle, the impact is notable; It historically determined whether or not applications could draw buttons or other widgets in their own windows, or even forego window frames entirely; usually saving a great deal of space in the process. But once an application is responsible for drawing its own frame, all sorts of naughty things can happen, such as a crashed application becoming immovable or unclosable – without opening task managers or using cryptic hotkeys. If programs don’t do the highest quality job drawing their decorations, it causes problems.

Because of those points, SSDs are traditionally considered inflexible and wasteful of space, while CSDs are considered potentially unstable and unpredictable in certain cases, but very flexible in general. KDE developers like Martin Gräßlin, and many other KDE contributors have given this topic serious thought because there are serious pros and cons on either side, and made the decision that CSDs have too many downsides they want to avoid.

Introducing DWD; the next generation of SSD

The VDG has been tasked and trusted by very intelligent folks to conceptualise an evolution of SSDs; internally we’ve been calling it Dynamic Window Decorations or “DWD” for short, to avoid confusion. And it has us excited.

Before I continue, a disclaimer:

This is still deep, deep in the conceptual phase and we don’t know *if* it will be implemented, when it would be implemented, how it would be implemented, or when it would be adopted. There’s a large number of ifs, and we don’t have specifics. One thing we will say is that currently, this is the idea with the most developer interest;

Also, we are actively seeking community feedback on the DWD concept, use-cases which might be desired, and developer feedback. I’m sure we’d also want feedback from other projects interested in the DWD concept.

Lastly, there’s many examples in this post; many developers are probably finding out about this concept the same time as you – please don’t inundate them with questions;  we don’t know if this concept will even be implemented. KDE developers are extremely busy with many fantastic features, so please respect their inboxes.

Thank you.

So, what is DWD?

DWD can be boiled down to a core protocol where an application would broadcast a list of widget specifications, at which point other parts of the system (“DWD Consoles”) could take the specified widgets structure, generate the UI, and display native widgets where desired. Using this method, DWDs try to strike a balance between SSDs and CSDs, allowing application developers to be more flexible inside the window decoration while also addressing the need of a window manager to remain in control to avoid the downsides of CSDs.

Indeed, DWDs would be themeable like traditional decorations, fully supporting transparency effects.

It’s important to note that the application is not responsible for drawing the widgets, only specifying what widgets it wants drawn. An application might say “I have a button, this is its text, and when its clicked I want it to send a signal back to me”. The application would have no part in the rendering of the widget.

What could DWD do for you?

DWD is more than being able to embed some widgets into a window border – that’s the main benefit and design goal, but we quickly realised it can go a lot further since the window manager could also relay these requests to other parts of the system; enabling them to become “DWD Consoles” and display widgets outside the window entirely;

  • Plasma could display widgets directly on a panel, below window thumbnails, or even directly on the desktop itself, controlling windows without even opening them. Exporting windows controls to a plasma panel may allow some applications to run completely  chromeless.
  • A media player might export its most prominent controls, and you could use them in the task-manager window preview without ever restoring the window. (thought in some scenarios it’s also possible with MPRIS)
  • Tools like the amazing KDE Connect could receive requests for controls and embed them on your phone. You could conceivably open your phone – in another room – and tell Muon to do an update and watch the progress from your phone.
  • Finally, raw console. Not so much for usage as much as it would be used for testing the protocol in a bare-metal way.

DWDs could be exported to panels, window decorations, or potentially even phones.

What would DWD look like?

DWD in decorations would look remarkably like CSDs, but more consistent. Applications would not have the ability to say “I want my decos on the bottom”, or “I want my window frame to be pink and furry”, or “I want my window to be a trapezoid”. DWD applications could, however, provide a stripped-down version of the standard colour palette used by KDE which the DWD Receiver could optionally use, which the user could still optionally disable.

What is important to notice, however, is that as opposed to CSD, the window decorator remains in full control. If an applications asks the decorator to use a special color palette and the user doesn’t want that, the window decorator can decline the request and keep all applications visually consistent.

If you were the type of person who has a theme with their window controls on the bottom, you can rock bottom-window DWDs! Do you like your minimise button on the left, and your close button on the right? DWD can fit in the middle. A core goal is the acknowledgement that users know what’s best for themselves. You should be able to configure what you like, and have your preferences enforced by the system.

DWDs could export most – if not all – chrome in simple applications.

If a computer doesn’t have DWD – or you disable DWD, then DWD would simply fall back to drawing widgets inside the traditional application area as usual. So if you use Gnome, XFCE, Windows, or Ratpoison, DWD won’t break other environments. KDE apps would look and run almost exactly the same as they do now; when they open they would quickly negotiate with the DWD server to determine if they should hide some widgets from the content of the window and have the server render them in the DWD instead, always showing the widgets in the traditional content area if no DWD support was detected.

In addition, applications such as Mozilla Firefox could use plugins to export their tab data and hide native tabs – giving non-standard applications full DWD support. Since DWD would be standardised, any plugins of this manner would only need to be updated to support the application – and would work wherever DWDs are supported.

Distributions could potentially brand DWDs knowing they would not be violated by applications.

How might DWD work?

DWD is a protocol based on applications exporting the structure of a small set of widgets, along with a menu, and metadata such as colour schemes and technical info in a client<->server<->console relationship. This would be done in an environment independent manner, so DWD could function on any environment that wants to implement the protocol.

The specification would limit applications to exporting from a set of predefined widgets, and the control of how those widgets are used is entirely up to whatever is drawing those widgets. The protocol would be kept simple, clean, and goal-oriented, with less focus on specific widgets (“I want a slider”) and more focus on actions (“I want a range”). Applications could not invent new widgets, but new widgets and goals might be added to the specification later as the demand is noted.

Many services could accept DWD controls, and act as DWD consoles; the window manager could display CSD-like controls, Plasma could embed controls in a number of places, and KDE connect could receive content, too.  DWD would not be a replacement for protocols like MPRIS, but for many applications DWD would help broadcast a wider range of controls to outside sources than normally feasible.

The two main componented of DWDs; the control menu, and the console client (here shown as a window decoration)

As the widgets are drawn by the ‘consoles’, the window manager can handle applications that are stuck as it does now, allowing the various consoles to much more gracefully disable them until the application becomes responsive or is forced closed; so none of the downsides of CSD crash-cases impact DWDs. The primary goal of DWD is for Dynamic Windows Decorations, and it should always be the first design goal, but DWD opens many other possibilities.

DWDs in various states and configurations. The second example illustrates DWDs in environments without DWD support. Window decorations could easily offer different modes to better accommodate screens; Example 3 is a compact variant. Window decorations could also side-load or bottom-load decorations on the window – it’s up to the user.

Where can I learn more?

I’m sure there will be several developers reigning hellfire in on the various mistakes this post probably has – so the comments section will probably become a good place. But I’d recommend avoiding flooding developers with DWD questions; you will likely see DWD posts come out on aggregators or social circles, and until we have a firm grasp of how this technology might form – we request your patience. Smart people with more influence will likely help change these designs dramatically for the better if they go forward.

I will be posting more in-depth designs and work on individual components of this DWD concept, and refinement will happen as feedback rolls in. I, personally, will not post any more technical details on how DWD may work – I’m not qualified to go deeper on this subject, and again, smarter people will figure it out better than my conclusions; I’ll continue posting designs and concepts for DWD applications as a mini-series in the coming week, with more focus on individual DWD elements and application.

And again;

This is still deep, deep in the conceptual phase and we don’t know *if* it will be implemented, when it would be implemented, how it would be implemented, or when it would be adopted. There’s a large number of ifs, and we don’t have specifics. One thing we will say is that currently, this is the idea with the most developer interest.

Also, we are actively seeking community feedback on the DWD concept, use-cases which might be desired, and developer feedback. I’m sure we’d also want feedback from other projects interested in the DWD concept.

Lastly, there’s many examples in this post; many developers are probably finding out about this concept the same time as you – please don’t inundate them with questions, as, again, we don’t know if this concept will even be implemented. KDE developers are extremely busy with many fantastic features, so please respect their inboxes.

Thank you.

Last, but not least;

I’d like to give my sincerest gratitude to the KDE community for the support of my initial PlanetKDE posts, and especially to the excellent KDE VDG group whom I’ve had the privilege to work with. They absolutely define great community. I’m so excited to have gotten to bring the earliest VDG DWD concepts to the community, and the Visual Design Group was simply amazing in making it happen, so thank you!


Categories: FLOSS Project Planets
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