FLOSS Project Planets

Carl Trachte: IE and Getting a Text File Off the Web - Selenium Web Tools

Planet Python - Thu, 2015-03-26 12:41
I've blogged previously about getting information off of a distant server on my employer's internal SharePoint site.  Automating this can be a little challenging, especially when there's a change.

My new desktop showed up with Internet Explorer 11 and Windows 7 Enterprise.  When I went to run my MineSight multirun (basically a batch file with a GUI front end that our mine planning vendor provides) the file fetch from our SharePoint site didn't work.  A little googling led me to Selenium.

As is often the case, I am wayyyy late to the party here.  I remember Selenium from Pycon 2010 in Atlanta because they gave us a nice mug with new string formatting on it that I use frequently (both the mug and the formatting):

 I was at Pycon 2010 . . . and I have the mug to prove it.

 My project manager/boss at the time, Eric, seeing me gush over the string formatting commands, did his usual button-pushing exercise by commenting, "I don't know; why didn't they put something on there like 'from pot import coffee'?"  People, y'know?

Back to Selenium - I was able to get what I needed from it with some research and downloading.  The steps are basically:

     1) Download IEDriverServer.exe     2) Put the executable in a location in your path.     3) Download Python Selenium Bindings and follow the install instructions.  I went the Python 3.4 route (versus the Python 2.7 that comes with MineSight) - personal preference on my part.

    4) Make sure your Internet Explorer environment/application is set up in a way that won't cause you problems.  I could try to describe this, but this blog post from a Selenium developer does it so much better (complete with screenshots):  http://jimevansmusic.blogspot.com/2012/08/youre-doing-it-wrong-protected-mode-and.html.  When Microsoft talks about "zones" and IE Protected Mode, the zones refer to things like "Trusted Sites," company web, external internet, etc. - all those have to be set to protected mode or things won't work and you'll get a fairly cryptic error message when the script crashes.

For my example, I was able to comment out some of the things I need to do within the MineSight multirun.  The DOS window hangs and IEDriverServer stays open within the MineSight multirun and app - I hacked this problem by killing it with an os.system() call.  Whatever it takes. I couldn't efficiently get the script to recognize HTML tag names, so I hacked that with text processing.  This is bad, but effective. The code: #!C:\Python34\python """
Get text from site via Internet Explorer.
""" INST = 'instructions.txt' # For killing process inside Multirun.
# import os from time import sleep as slpx from selenium import webdriver # XXX - hack - had difficulty getting
#       things by tag - text processed it.
PRETAG = '<pre>'
PRETAGLEN = len(PRETAG)
PRETAGCLOSE = '</pre>'# Seconds to pause at end.
PAUSE = 3INSTRUCTIONS = 'http://ftp3.usa.openbsd.org/pub/OpenBSD/5.6/README'
INSTR = 'instructions.txt' # XXX - may not matter (\r versus \n), in all cases
#       but for numbers in multirun, makeshift chomp
#       processing made a difference.
RETCHAR = '\r' # Hack to shutdown DOS window.# TASKKILL = 'taskkill /im IEDriverServer.exe /F' def getbody(url):
    """
    Given the website address (url),
    returns inner HTML text stripped of tags.
    """
    browser = webdriver.Ie()
    browser.get(url)
    text = browser.page_source
    browser.close()
    text = text[(text.index(PRETAG) + PRETAGLEN):]
    text = text[:(text.index(PRETAGCLOSE))]
    text = text.split(RETCHAR)
    [x.strip() for x in text]
    return text textii = getbody(INSTRUCTIONS)
print('\nDealing with writing of instructions file . . .\n')
textii = ''.join(textii)
f = open(INSTR, 'w')
f.write(textii)
f.close()print('Instructions copied.')print('\nPausing {:d} seconds . . .\n'.format(PAUSE))
slpx(PAUSE)
# XXX - can't get window to close in Multirun (MXPERT) - CBT 23MAR2015
# os.system(TASKKILL)  
Categories: FLOSS Project Planets

Drupal for Government: Conditional Views - Sure beats Views PHP for simple variance

Planet Drupal - Thu, 2015-03-26 12:09

I recently had to add a new content type to an existing tabled view... the thing was that one content type had an extra field to define a link... fine.. I figured I could go in and use Views PHP.... it's a hacky solution, but a few lines and I'd be out the door... curiosity got the better of me... I know Views PHP is a bit déclassé, so for good measure I googled for a solution, and pretty quickly stumbled on Views Conditional... the documentation is clear, but I figure a few screen shots won't hurt, and may encourage the next nerd looking for a better way to set either-or's in their views...

Steps to get some variance in your views

Categories: FLOSS Project Planets

Zlatan Todorić: Random bits

Planet Debian - Thu, 2015-03-26 11:04
Gogs

I installed today Gogs and configured it with mysql (yes, yes, I know - use postgres you punk!). I will not post details of how I did it because:

  • It still has "weird" coding as pointed already by others
  • It doesn't have fork and pull request ability yet

And there was end of journey. When they code in fork/PR , I will close my eyes on other coding stuff and try it again because Gitlab is not close to my heart and installing their binary takes ~850MB of space which means a lot of ruby code that could go wrong way.

It would be really awesome to have in archive something to apt install and have github-like place. It would be great if Debian infrastructure would have the possibility to have that.

Diaspora*

Although I am thrilled about it finally reaching Debian archive, it still isn't ready. Not even closely. I couldn't even finish installation of it and it's not suitable for main archive as it takes files from github repo of diaspora. Maybe poking around Bitnami folks about how they did it.

The power of Free software

Text Secure is was an mobile app that I thought it could take on Viber or WhatsUp. Besides all its goodies it had chance to send encrypted SMS to other TS users. Not anymore. Fortunate, there is a fork called SMSSecure which still has that ability.

Trolls

So there is this Allwinner company that does crap after crap. Their latest will reach wider audience and I hope it gets resolved in a matter how they would react if some big proprietary company was stealing their code. It seems Allwinner is a pseudo for Alllooser. Whoa, that was fun!

A year old experiment

So I had a bet with a friend that I will run for a year Debian Unstable mixed with some packages from experimental and do some random testings on packages of interest to them. Also I promised to update aggressively so it was to be twice a day. This was my only machine so the bet was really good as it by theory could break very often. Well on behalf of Debian community, I can say that Debian hasn't had a single big breakage. Yay!

The good side: on average I had ~3000 packages installed (they were in range from 2500-3500). I had for example xmonad, e17, gnome, cinnamon, xfce, systemd from experimental, kernels from experimental, nginx, apache, a lot of heavy packages, mixed packages from pip, npm, gems etc. So that makes it even more incredible that it stayed stable. There is no bigger kudos to people working on Debian, then when some sadist tries countless of ways to break it and Debian is just keeps running. I mean, I was doing my $PAID_WORK on this machine!

The bad side: there were small breakages. It's seems that polkit and systemd-side of gnome were going through a lot of changes because sometimes system would ask password for every action (logout, suspend, poweroff, connect to network etc), audio would work and would not work, would often by itself just mute sound on every play or it would take it to 100% (which would blow my head when I had earplugs), bluetooth is almost de facto not working in gnome (my bluetooth mice worked without single problem in lenny, squeeze, in wheezy it maybe had once or twice a problem, but in this year long test it's almost useless). System would also have random hangs from time to time.

The test: in the beginning my radeon card was too new and it was not supported by FLOSS driver so I ended up using fglrx which caused me a lot of annoyance (no brightness control, flickering of screen) but once FLOSS driver got support I was on it, and it performed more fluid (no glitches while moving windows). So as my friends knew that I have radeon and they want to play games on their machines (I play my Steam games on FLOSS driver) they set me the task to try fglrx driver every now end then. End result - there is no stable fglrx driver for almost a year, it breaks graphical interface so I didn't even log into DE with it for at least 8 months if not more. On the good side my expeditions in flgrx where quick - install it, boot into disaster, remove it, boot into freedom. Downside seems to be that removing fglrx driver, leaves a lot of its own crap on system (I may be mistaking but it seems I am not).

Well, that's all for today. I think so. You can never be sure.

Categories: FLOSS Project Planets

Doug Vann: SxSw 2015 AND My 50th Drupalcamp, the good the bad & the ugly

Planet Drupal - Thu, 2015-03-26 10:21

Warning: mildly graphic medical descriptions referenced below...

The Good:

7 years and 6 months in the making, I very much anticipated my 50th Drupalcamp. As seems to happen at least one time each year, I flew straight from one event to another. I had my 2nd speaking gig at SxSw in Austin then flew directly to Chicago for MADcamp. I love the new name: Midwest Area Drupal Camp!

My Drupal 8 Live Demo at SxSw was well received. When I proposed the session, I thought for sure we’d be in a Release Candidate. As it turned out, Drupal 8 was only at Beta 7. I walked through demonstrations of creating content types and views and placing blocks with the new layout system. Matt Cheney joined in for a short but powerful demo of Configuration Management. Over 20 Attendees followed along with their Pantheon instances which were built directly from Drupal 8 HEAD. This gave us FAR FEWER bugs than Beta 7 contained.

My Pantheon training class at MADCamp in Chicago went very well. We were converting configuration to code via features and committing the code to the repository, then pushing it up the deployment chain. As is always the case, the attendees marveled at how a modern Development Operations workflow could be achieved without being a sysadmin or paying for multiple servers and glueing them together with scripts.

The Bad:
About 9:30 on Saturday 3/14, The Only Real Pi Day Of Our Lives, I was walking in downtown Austin on 6th street and got me left foot hooked into a storm drain as I navigated the curb back up to the sidewalk. I went down FAST and planted on my side with my left arm fully extended. Those nearby heard the THUD and rushed to help. I got right back up. Brushed off some sidewalk debris and marveled that nothing hurt and there was no blood! End of story… Not quite…

The Ugly: [VERY UGLY]
As the goose egg swelled up near me left elbow, I applied ice to it throughout the night. It took on some gnarly colors and would swell back up if the ice wasn’t directly on it.

The next day, still no pain, but it looks horrible. On the phone, my wife insists that I go to an urgent-care facility, so off I go. 3 x-rays later, no breaks or fractures are visible. End of story… Not quite…

Wednesday [4days after the fall] I wake up to fly out to Chicago. My entire left forearm has taken on every sickly shade of blue black and Burgundy! By that evening, my hand is welling up as well.

Thursday I teach the Pantheon class all day and don’t think much about my arm. After all, IT NEVER HURT! But by Thursday night I have TWO purple fingers and a third on the way. I’m afraid to go to bed at 1am, so I head for the Cook County ER in Chicago. They draw blood to test for an infection and x-ray e again. No breaks or fractures. It is explained that I have a lot of blood pooling up beneath my skin and it's going to take some time to heal. They send me home.
Arriving at the hotel about 5:30, I clean up, take 2 Ibuprofen PM and fall asleep at 6am. The phone wakes me up at 8am. Somehow I left the ringer on AND was able to fumble around with it and answer it. It’s the same Doctor that saw me in ER. He says my platelet count is slightly elevated and he’s afraid I may actually have an infection. He tells me to get back to ER pronto! I ask if I can sleep it off first. He says NO.

I’m back at ER within the hour. More blood work, more x-rays, this time including chest, shoulder, arm, hand, and leg. Many hours later [sleeping on and off] the x-rays and blood work look fine. I’m back at the hotel. My wife is in a panic over it all and asks that I catch the next flight home to Indy. They’re all booked so I grab one the next day.

My 50th Drupal Camp included an awesome dinner for the out-of-towners, one full day of training, an amazing pre-camp dinner, 2 ER visits, and only a couple of hours at the actual camp. I stopped in to say HI and BYE. Oh well.. At least dinner that night was amazing Greek food with good friends.

And now…

Hand still swells up badly if not iced. I haven’t been able to use my left hand much for 36 hours. I can’t even make a fist.

The alien coloring of my left forearm is fading slowly. The goose egg by my elbow is as goose as it has ever been. TWELVE DAYS after the fall?!?!?

Doc says, wait it out. The body will heal itself over time.

Here’s to hoping that my next MADCamp is
WAY MORE BORING than my 50th DrupalCamp!

Drupal Planet

View the discussion thread.

Categories: FLOSS Project Planets

Code Karate: Selecting a Javascript Framework [Infographic]

Planet Drupal - Thu, 2015-03-26 08:33

Drupal 8 coming (queue suspenseful music)!

Categories: FLOSS Project Planets

OpenSource.com: Using Spark DataFrames for large scale data science

Planet Apache - Thu, 2015-03-26 07:00

Spark's new DataFrame API is inspired by data frames in R and Python (Pandas), but designed from the ground up to support modern big data and data science applications.

Categories: FLOSS Project Planets

PyCon: For Microsoft, Python support extends far beyond Windows installers

Planet Python - Thu, 2015-03-26 06:14
You might have known that Python's 1.0 release came at the start of 1994, but did you know Microsoft shipped its Merchant Server 1.0 product built on Python only a few years later in 1996? Microsoft, this year's Keystone sponsor, has long been a user and supporter of Python, with a history of use within build and test infrastructure and individual users all around the company. There are even a few lawyers writing Python code.

In 2006 they introduced the world to IronPython, a .NET runtime for Python, and later the excellent Python Tools for Visual Studio plug-in in 2011. They continue to release Python code, as it's "a must-have language for any team that releases developer kits or libraries, especially for services on Azure that can be used from any operating system," according to Steve Dower, a developer on Microsoft's Python Tools team.

"Python has very strong cross-platform support, which is absolutely critical these days," says Steve. "It’s very attractive for our users to literally be able to 'write once-run anywhere.'

"The breadth of the community is also very attractive, especially the support for scientific use," he continued. Microsoft has been a significant donor to the Jupyter project (formerly IPython) as well as a platinum sponsor of the NumFOCUS Foundation.

Along with supporting those projects, they have also been providing MSDN subscriptions to the core Python team to assist with development and testing on Windows. Beyond supporting the existing developers, they've jumped in the ring themselves as one of the few companies to employ developers working on CPython itself. "Python has done an amazing job of working well on Windows, and we hope that by taking an active involvement we can push things along further," offers Steve, whose work includes being a core developer on the CPython project.


Steve's CPython work has focused around Windows issues, including an improved installer for 3.5. Additionally, the team was able to come up with a special package for Python users: Microsoft Visual C++ Compiler for Python 2.7. Due to Python 2.7 being built on the Visual C++ 2008 runtime, which is no longer supported, they created this package to provide the necessary tools and headers to continue building extension modules for Python 2.7, which will live through at least 2020 as was announced at last year's language summit.

Along with efforts on Python itself, they're hard at work on improving tooling for the upcoming Visual Studio 2015 and Python 3.5 releases. "Practically everything we do will integrate with Visual Studio in some way," says Steve of Python Tools for Visual Studio. "PTVS has been free and open-source from day one, and combined with Visual Studio Community Edition makes for a powerful, free multi-lingual IDE."

As for what's next with PTVS, Steve says, "we try and be responsive to the needs of our users, and we are an open-source project that accepts contributions, so there’s always a chance that the next amazing feature won’t even come from our team. We've also recently joined forces with the Azure Machine Learning team and are looking forward to adding more data science tooling as well.

"We want new and experienced developers alike to have the best tools, the best libraries, the best debugging and the best services without having to give up Linux support, Visual Studio, CPython, git, or whatever tools they’ve already integrated into their workflow."

When it comes to PyCon, they see it as "a learning opportunity for Microsoft, as well as a chance for us to show off some of the work we’ve been doing." "For those of us at Microsoft who always knew how great the Python community is, it’s also been great to bring our colleagues and show them.

"We love that PyCon is about building and diversifying the community, and not about sales, marketing and business deals," says Steve. If you head to their booth in the expo hall, you'll find out first hand that they're there to talk about code and building great things. They're looking forward to showing off some great new demos and have exciting new things to talk about.

The PyCon organizers thank Microsoft for another year of sponsorship and look forward to another great conference!
Categories: FLOSS Project Planets

Tryton News: Pycon 2015

Planet Python - Thu, 2015-03-26 06:00

This year, there will be 2 Foundation members (Sharoon Thomas and Cédric Krier) present during the PyCon 2015 at Montréal. PyCon is the largest annual conference for the Python community which Tryton is a part of.

If you want to meet Tryton's people, we will host an Open Space and sprint on Tryton will be organized.

Categories: FLOSS Project Planets

PyPy Development: PyPy 2.5.1 Released

Planet Python - Thu, 2015-03-26 05:45
PyPy 2.5.1 - Pineapple Bromeliad We’re pleased to announce PyPy 2.5.1, Pineapple Bromeliad following on the heels of 2.5.0. You can download the PyPy 2.5.1 release here:
http://pypy.org/download.html We would like to thank our donors for the continued support of the PyPy project, and for those who donate to our three sub-projects, as well as our volunteers and contributors. We’ve shown quite a bit of progress, but we’re slowly running out of funds. Please consider donating more, or even better convince your employer to donate, so we can finish those projects! The three sub-projects are:
  • Py3k (supporting Python 3.x): We have released a Python 3.2.5 compatible version we call PyPy3 2.4.0, and are working toward a Python 3.3 compatible version
     
  • STM (software transactional memory): We have released a first working version, and continue to try out new promising paths of achieving a fast multithreaded Python
  • NumPy which requires installation of our fork of upstream numpy, available on bitbucket
We would also like to encourage new people to join the project. PyPy has many layers and we need help with all of them: PyPy and Rpython documentation improvements, tweaking popular modules to run on pypy, or general help with making Rpython’s JIT even better.

What is PyPy? PyPy is a very compliant Python interpreter, almost a drop-in replacement for CPython 2.7. It’s fast (pypy and cpython 2.7.x performance comparison) due to its integrated tracing JIT compiler.

This release supports x86 machines on most common operating systems (Linux 32/64, Mac OS X 64, Windows, and OpenBSD), as well as newer ARM hardware (ARMv6 or ARMv7, with VFPv3) running Linux.

While we support 32 bit python on Windows, work on the native Windows 64 bit python is still stalling, we would welcome a volunteer to handle that.

Highlights
  • The past months have seen pypy mature and grow, as rpython becomes the goto solution for writing fast dynamic language interpreters. Our separation of Rpython from the python interpreter PyPy is now much clearer in the PyPy documentation and we now have seperate RPython documentation. Tell us what still isn’t clear, or even better help us improve the documentation.
  • We merged version 2.7.9 of python’s stdlib. From the python release notice:
    • The entirety of Python 3.4’s ssl module has been backported. See PEP 466 for justification.
    • HTTPS certificate validation using the system’s certificate store is now enabled by default. See PEP 476 for details.
    • SSLv3 has been disabled by default in httplib and its reverse dependencies due to the POODLE attack.
    • The ensurepip module has been backported, which provides the pip package manager in every Python 2.7 installation. See PEP 477.

  • The garbage collector now ignores parts of the stack which did not change since the last collection, another performance boost
  • errno and LastError are saved around cffi calls so things like pdb will not overwrite it
  • We continue to asymptotically approach a score of 7 times faster than cpython on our benchmark suite, we now rank 6.98 on latest runs
Please try it out and let us know what you think. We welcome success stories, experiments, or benchmarks, we know you are using PyPy, please tell us about it!
Cheers
The PyPy Team
Categories: FLOSS Project Planets

Pronovix: A free and open source DITA CCMS, modelling arbitrary XML in Drupal

Planet Drupal - Thu, 2015-03-26 04:41

Drupal has all the elements to build a custom content model that can mirror a DITA specialisation. The really exciting thing is that this data model can be built from the UI, without a single line of code. While there are considerable drawbacks to the usability of the resulting interface, the fact that this is a free and open source implementation means that those who have more time than money could use this implementation as a starting point to build a DITA CCMS that accommodates an arbitrary specialisation.

Categories: FLOSS Project Planets

Patrick Matthäi: More wheezy-backports work

Planet Debian - Thu, 2015-03-26 04:01

Hello,

now you can install the following package versions from wheezy-backports:

  • apt-dater-host (Source split, 0.9.0-3+wheezy1 => 1.0.0-2~bpo70+1)
  • glusterfs (3.2.7-3+deb7u1 => 3.5.2-1~bpo70+1)
  • geoip-database (20141009-1~bpo70+1 => 20150209-1~bpo70+1)

geoip-database introduces a new package geoip-database-extra, which includes the free GeoIP City and GeoIP ASNum databases.

glusterfs will get an update in a few days ago to fix CVE-2014-3619.

Categories: FLOSS Project Planets

Continuum Analytics Blog: The Art of Abstraction - Continuum + Silicon Valley Data Science White Paper

Planet Python - Wed, 2015-03-25 20:00

How Separating Code, Data, and Context Will Make Your Business Better

Categories: FLOSS Project Planets

Justin Mason: Links for 2015-03-25

Planet Apache - Wed, 2015-03-25 19:58
Categories: FLOSS Project Planets

Matthew Garrett: Python for remote reconfiguration of server firmware

Planet Debian - Wed, 2015-03-25 19:51
One project I've worked on at Nebula is a Python module for remote configuration of server hardware. You can find it here, but there's a few caveats:
  1. It's not hugely well tested on a wide range of hardware
  2. The interface is not yet guaranteed to be stable
  3. You'll also need this module if you want to deal with IBM (well, Lenovo now) servers
  4. The IBM support is based on reverse engineering rather than documentation, so who really knows how good it is

There's documentation in the README, and I'm sorry for the API being kind of awful (it suffers rather heavily from me writing Python while knowing basically no Python). Still, it ought to work. I'm interested in hearing from anybody with problems, anybody who's interested in getting it on Pypi and anybody who's willing to add support for new HP systems.

comments
Categories: FLOSS Project Planets

Drupal core announcements: Plan for upcoming D8 Accelerate sprint on DrupalCI (Modernizing Testbot Initiative)

Planet Drupal - Wed, 2015-03-25 17:54

Next week, an international conglomeration of awesome folks will convene in Portland, Oregon for a D8 Accelerate-funded sprint on DrupalCI: Modernizing Testbot Initiative.

The main aim of DrupalCI is to rebuild Drupal's current testbot infrastructure (which is currently powered by an aging Drupal 6 site) to industry-standard components such as Jenkins, Docker, and so on, architected to be generally useful outside of Drupal.org. See Nick Schuch's Architecting DrupalCI at DrupalCon Amsterdam blog post for more details.

The goal is to end the sprint with an "MVP" product on production hardware, with integration to Drupal.org, which can be used to demonstrate a full end-to-end D8 core ‘simpletest’ test run request from Drupal.org through to results appearing on the results server.

You can read and subscribe to the sprint hit-list issue to get an idea of who's going to be working on what, and the places where you too can jump in (see the much longer version for more details).

This is a particularly important initiative to help with, since it not only unblocks Drupal 8 from shipping, it also makes available awesome new testing tools for all Drupal.org projects!

Go Team! :)

Categories: FLOSS Project Planets

Yves-Alexis Perez: LXCs upgrade to Jessie

Planet Debian - Wed, 2015-03-25 17:26

So I started migrating some of my LXCs to Jessie, to test the migration in advance. The upgrade itself was easy (the LXC is mostly empty and only runs radicale), but after the upgrade I couldn't login anymore (using lxc-console since I don't have lxc-attach, the host is on Wheezy). So this is mostly a note to self.

auth.log was showing:

Mar 25 22:10:13 lxc-sync login[1033]: pam_loginuid(login:session): Cannot open /proc/self/loginuid: Read-only file system Mar 25 22:10:13 lxc-sync login[1033]: pam_loginuid(login:session): set_loginuid failed Mar 25 22:10:13 lxc-sync login[1033]: pam_unix(login:session): session opened for user root by LOGIN(uid=0) Mar 25 22:10:13 lxc-sync login[1033]: Cannot make/remove an entry for the specified session

The last message isn't too useful, but the first one gave the answer. Since LXC isn't really ready for security stuff, I have some hardening on top of that, and one measure is to not have rw access to /proc. I don't really need pam_loginuid there, so I just disabled that. I just need to remember to do that after each LXC upgrade.

Other than that, I have to boot using SystemV init, since apparently systemd doesn't cope too well with the various restrictions I enforce on my LXCs:

lxc-start -n sync Failed to mount sysfs at /sys: Operation not permitted

(which is expected, since I drop CAP_SYS_ADMIN from my LXCs). I didn't yet investigate how to stop systemd doing that, so for now I'm falling back to SystemV init until I find the correct customization:

lxc-start -n sync /lib/sysvinit/init INIT: version 2.88 booting [info] Using makefile-style concurrent boot in runlevel S. hostname: you must be root to change the host name mount: permission denied mount: permission denied [FAIL] udev requires a mounted sysfs, not started ... failed! failed! mount: permission denied [info] Setting the system clock. hwclock: Cannot access the Hardware Clock via any known method. hwclock: Use the --debug option to see the details of our search for an access method. [warn] Unable to set System Clock to: Wed Mar 25 21:21:43 UTC 2015 ... (warning). [ ok ] Activating swap...done. mount: permission denied mount: permission denied mount: permission denied mount: permission denied [ ok ] Activating lvm and md swap...done. [....] Checking file systems...fsck from util-linux 2.25.2 done. [ ok ] Cleaning up temporary files... /tmp. [ ok ] Mounting local filesystems...done. [ ok ] Activating swapfile swap...done. mount: permission denied mount: permission denied [ ok ] Cleaning up temporary files.... [ ok ] Setting kernel variables ...done. [....] Configuring network interfaces...RTNETLINK answers: Operation not permitted Failed to bring up lo. done. [ ok ] Cleaning up temporary files.... [FAIL] startpar: service(s) returned failure: hostname.sh udev ... failed! INIT: Entering runlevel: 2 [info] Using makefile-style concurrent boot in runlevel 2. dmesg: read kernel buffer failed: Operation not permitted [ ok ] Starting Radicale CalDAV server : radicale. Yes, there are a lot of errors, but they seem to be handled just fine.
Categories: FLOSS Project Planets

Aaron Winborn: Goodbye, my Son. My friend.

Planet Drupal - Wed, 2015-03-25 16:54


“Your journey to heaven or hell or oblivion or reincarnation or whatever it is that death holds. … This is the Antechamber of the Mystery…”
Brent Weeks, The Way of Shadows

I suppose this will be the last entry in Aaron Winborn’s blog. This is his dad, Victor Winborn, filling in for him. Aaron entered his final sleep of this life on March 24, 2015. His transition was peaceful, and he was at peace with himself.
Aaron was the oldest of six natural siblings and two step-brothers. He was convinced, of course, that I was doing the father thing all wrong and that he could do far better on his own. He finally got to try to prove it when he gained two daughters of his own. Unfortunately, he was diagnosed with ALS shortly after the youngest was born. We will never know how successful he would have been with teenage daughters, but if the first few years of life with the girls are any indication, he would have been an outstanding father.

His mom, Lynn, no doubt carries the most memories of his infancy and childhood, though there is the interesting story or two that Aaron carried with him to the end. Such as the time his friend, Buddy (remember the My Buddy dolls?) became so dirty that his mom insisted Buddy needed a bath. Aaron was having a panic attack over Buddy drowning in the washer, so his mom invited him to sit in front of our front loader and watch his playmate float past the window in the door of the machine. Things were going great and Aaron was pretty sure his friend must be enjoying the swim, when Buddy suddenly exploded and his innards filled the machine with cotton-like blood. This was such a vivid evisceration that Aaron carried that vision, burned into his retina, to the end.

At twelve, we let him fly to Houston to live for a few months with his aunt and uncle, Diana and Les. He learned lots of useful things there, such as that you can’t just get your hair wet to prove to your more than astute aunt that you washed it. You actually have to put a little of the shampoo on your head so she can smell the strawberry scented perfume in it. His Uncle Les was one of his favorite people in the world. Les is the most captivating professor that either of us ever took a class from. In college, Les’ classes on Vietnam history, Film history, and Black history gave Aaron a yearning to teach.

Aaron had innumerable interests and was talented in most all of them. He left home shortly after high school in order to spend time with Paul Solomon (Fellowship of the Inner Light) at Paul’s retreat, Hearthfire. A year or so later, we learned that he had become personal assistant for Elizabeth Kubler Ross (On Death and Dying). Then we learned that he had moved to a commune in England, Mickleton House in Mickleton Village, Gloucestershire, UK. While there he worked in construction and kissed a girl for the first time.
When he finally returned home, Aaron and I were able to work together for several years. As we drove from job to job, we talked about books, poetry, religion, history, philosophy, technology, and science. We frequently didn’t agree on many topics, but we had eerily similar interests. That made it both fun and frustrating to carry on extended conversations. Of all my kids, Aaron was at the same time, both the most like me and the least like me. I often wondered how that worked. While he may have inherited a lot from his old dad, he always had a mind of his own.

One of those extended conversations had to do with both the purpose and destiny of the soul. I had homed in on the concept that a person was a soul, consisting of physical body and immaterial spirit. At the time, Aaron had no problem with that concept. Where we departed ways was in the purpose. He felt that we were in this physical realm in order to overcome physicality and to develop the spirit – at all odds with the physical pressures against the concept. My belief was that the spirit came to this world in order to learn to master the physical. The final take of our argument was that since he was the younger and had more years ahead of him than I did, I hoped that he would somehow find the real answer and share it with me. Now that Aaron has passed into or through the “Antechamber of the Mystery”, if he has any consciousness at this point, he knows the answer. Unfortunately, the veil separating us will prevent him from giving me the answer. I’ll have to go find it for myself.

The yearning to teach that his Uncle Les had instilled in him was finally fulfilled when he was offered the opportunity to teach at School in the Community in Carrboro, North Carolina. This is where he learned of his love for Web development. During this period, he attended a retreat at the Mid-Atlantic Buddhist Association outside St. Louis, and managed to fulfill a 30-day vow of silence. Any of you who knew Aaron while he had a voice, know that the experience must have been torture for him. Shortly after that, he met the love of his life, Gwen Pfeifer. They then moved to Willimantic, Connecticut. He taught at Sudbury School about 25 minutes away in Hampton. Hampton has the honor of being the only town in Connecticut without a stoplight. Their oldest daughter, Ashlin, was born while he worked there.

A few short years later, he was able to fulfill his next big dream of professional Web development. He became the first employee of Advomatic and ultimately also became an expert in the Drupal content management platform. After they moved to Harrisburg, Pennsylvania he wrote the book, Drupal Multimedia. In Harrisburg, Ashlin (and now Sabina) started attending The Circle School.

The Circle School community has been the core of the most amazing support group that I have ever heard of, much less experienced. For almost four years, they have offered food, help, work, laughs, and tears to the entire family. The co-captains in the Gwen & Aaron’s Helping Hands group have been relentless in their efforts to keep the little community vibrant, healthy, and ever-busy. Every time I have made the trip up to PA to visit, there have been multiple people dropping by to provide meals, take Ashlin to local events, help Aaron with his computer work, or just to offer hugs and hold hands with him.

I think the most important non-family member in their lives has been Michelle, who started out as a Mother’s Helper, and ended up being, besides Gwen, Aaron’s primary caregiver. She has become such an important part of the family, that little Sabina actually believes she is a family member. Michelle just finished her degree in psychology, though; and she and her husband will be moving closer to his work in Baltimore. She will always be a part of Ashlin’s and Sabina’s hearts, and I suspect will stay close to the girls for many years.

As many of you know, Aaron chose to take the path of coming back to this life in the same body that he inhabited here as Jeffrey Aaron Winborn. In other words, he chose to have his body frozen (cryonics) and hopes to have it restored when science has the knowhow to bring it back from the dead and to heal the affliction that ALS laid upon him.

While he was still at home, Aaron and I went through a period of reading many of Robert Heinlein’s books. One especially notable character of his was a curmudgeon named Lazarus Long. Lazarus was the main character of a number of books. I guess I didn’t realize at the time how much an impression this character made on Aaron. He ended up naming his first dog Lazarus Long Winborn. I just called him Grandpuppy. Aaron has been interested in cryonics for a long time, and had been planning on taking advantage of it even before he learned he had ALS. I have always wondered how much influence the Heinlein books had on this decision.

He leaves behind, his beautiful and loving partner, Gwen, and his two wonderful daughters, Ashlin and Sabina. Besides his core family, he leaves behind parents, siblings, aunts & uncles, cousins, a large local community of friends and caregivers, an extended family of coworkers, professional friends, activist friends, fellow ALS patients and survivors, and many more than I could ever know. There must be hundreds of people who have learned to love and honor him. And now comes the hardest moment a father can ever have when he has to say…

Goodbye, my Son. My friend.

Love,
Dad

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Categories: FLOSS Project Planets

Enrico Zini: google-ics-evil

Planet Debian - Wed, 2015-03-25 16:50
Work around Google evil .ics feeds

I've happily been using 2015/akonadi-install for my calendars, and yesterday I added an .ics feed export from Google, as a URL file source. It is a link in the form: https://www.google.com/calendar/ical/person%40gmail.com/private-12341234123412341234123412341234/basic.ics

After doing that, I noticed that the fan in my laptop was on more often than usual, and I noticed that akonadi-server and postgres were running very often, and doing quite a lot of processing.

The evil

I investigated and realised that Google seems to be doing everything they can to make their ical feeds hard to sync against efficiently. This is the list of what I have observed Gmail doing to an unchanged ical feed:

  • Date: headers in HTTP replies are always now
  • If-Modified-Since: is not supported
  • DTSTAMP of each element is always now
  • VTIMEZONE entries appear in random order
  • ORGANIZER CN entries randomly change between full name and plus.google.com user ID
  • ATTENDEE entries randomly change between having a CN or not having it
  • TRIGGER entries change spontaneously
  • CREATED entries change spontaneously

This causes akonadi to download and reprocess the entire ical feed at every single poll, and I can't blame akonadi for doing it. In fact, Google is saying that there is a feed with several years worth of daily appointments that all keep being changed all the time.

The work-around

As a work-around, I have configured the akonadi source to point at a local file on disk, and I have written a script to update the file only if the .ics feed has actually changed.

Have a look at the script: I consider it far from trivial, since it needs to do a partial parsing of the .ics feed to throw away all the nondeterminism that Google pollutes it with.

The setup

The script needs to be run periodically, and I used it as an opportunity to try systemd user timers:

$ cat ~/.config/systemd/user/update-ical-feeds.timer [Unit] Description=Updates ical feeds every hour # Only run when on AC power ConditionACPower=yes [Timer] # Run every hour OnActiveSec=1h # Run a minute after boot OnBootSec=1m Unit=update-ical-feeds.service $ cat ~/.config/systemd/user/update-ical-feeds.service [Unit] Description=Update ICal feeds [Service] # Use oneshot to prevent two updates being run in case the previous one # runs for more time than the timer interval Type=oneshot ExecStart=/home/enrico/tmp/calendars/update $ systemctl --user start update-ical-feeds.timer $ systemctl --user list-timers NEXT LEFT LAST PASSED UNIT ACTIVATES Wed 2015-03-25 22:19:54 CET 59min left Wed 2015-03-25 21:19:54 CET 2s ago update-ical-feeds.timer update-ical-feeds.service 1 timers listed. Pass --all to see loaded but inactive timers, too.

To reload the configuration after editing: systemctl --user daemon-reload.

Further investigation

I wonder if ConditionACPower needs to be in the .timer or in the .service, since there is a [Unit] section is in both. Update: I have been told it can be in the .timer.

I also wonder if there is a way to have the timer trigger only when online. There is a network-online.target and I do not know if it is applicable. I also do not know how to ask systemd if all the preconditions are currently met for a .service/.timer to run.

Finally, I especially wonder if it is worth hoping that Google will ever make their .ics feeds play nicely with calendar clients.

Categories: FLOSS Project Planets

Matthias Wessendorf: Push Notifications and the Internet of Things

Planet Apache - Wed, 2015-03-25 16:26

Today on Facebook’s F8 conference they announced Parse for IoT. This a cool, but not unexpected move, especially since there is demand to have connected objects being part of an (enterprise) cloud systems. We will see more of that happening soon, and our lesson learned on traditional mobile, will be applied to IoT devices or “connected objects” in general.

AeroGear and IoT

In the AeroGear project we have done similar experiments, bringing functionality of our UnifiedPush Server to the IoT space. My colleage Sébastien Blanc did two short screencasts on his work in this area:

The above examples basically leverage our support for SimplePush, which is a WebSocket based protocol used on Firefox OS for Push Notification. Due to the fact Firefox OS uses such an open protocol, we are able to extend this mechanism of Push Notifications delivery to other platforms, not just Firefox OS devices.

Bringing Push Notifications to the IoT sector is a logical move, to integrate connected objects and mobile cloud services!


Categories: FLOSS Project Planets
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