FLOSS Project Planets

FSF News: LibrePlanet 2015 brings free software luminaries to MIT

GNU Planet! - Tue, 2015-03-24 17:40

Richard Stallman gave the opening keynote

At a ceremony on Saturday, March 21st, Free Software Foundation executive director John Sullivan announced the winners of the FSF's annual Free Software Awards. Two awards were given: the Award for the Advancement of Free Software was presented to Sébastien Jodogne for his work on free software medical imaging, and the Award for Projects of Social Benefit was presented to Reglue, an Austin, TX organization that gives GNU/Linux laptops to families in need.

Software Freedom Conservancy executive director Karen Sandler closed out the conference with a rallying cry to "Stand up for the GNU GPL," in which she discussed a lawsuit recently filed in Germany to defend the GNU General Public License. When she asked the audience who was willing to stand up for copyleft, the entire room rose to its feet.

Karen Sandler gave the closing keynote

Videos of all the conference sessions, along with photographs from the conference, will soon be available on https://media.libreplanet.org, the conference's instance of GNU MediaGoblin, a free software media publishing platform that anyone can run.

LibrePlanet 2015 was produced in partnership by the Free Software Foundation and the Student Information Processing Board (SIPB) at MIT.

About the Free Software Foundation

The Free Software Foundation, founded in 1985, is dedicated to promoting computer users' right to use, study, copy, modify, and redistribute computer programs. The FSF promotes the development and use of free (as in freedom) software -- particularly the GNU operating system and its GNU/Linux variants -- and free documentation for free software. The FSF also helps to spread awareness of the ethical and political issues of freedom in the use of software, and its Web sites, located at fsf.org and gnu.org, are an important source of information about GNU/Linux. Donations to support the FSF's work can be made at https://donate.fsf.org. Its headquarters are in Boston, MA, USA.

More information about the FSF, as well as important information for journalists and publishers, is at https://www.fsf.org/press.

Media Contacts

Libby Reinish
Campaigns Manager
Free Software Foundation
+1 (617) 542 5942
campaigns@fsf.org

Categories: FLOSS Project Planets

Drupal for Government: Drupal, Tableau, and Media Tableau

Planet Drupal - Tue, 2015-03-24 15:31

Tableau is a helluva tool.  For data visualization it is at the top of its game... we recently had a 3 day seminar at UVa regarding Tableau, and I was stoked to see that they use Drupal heavily for their portal design.  

While I don't have the $$'s to run Tableau Server right now, it's a cool tool and something to consider...  Anyhow - here's a quick look at Tableau + Drupal + media tableau.  The upshot is that by integrating at the database level you can use views to display all of your workbooks... if all you want is to embed some visualizations in your content this isn't necessary as tableau provides iFrames for workbooks too... to use that just install media tableau, integrate with your wysiwyg editor of choice and move on... I wanted to test it all, so here's the kitchen sink :)

Here are the steps I've taken for the complete integration with views etc... if you just want to embed some tableau views in drupal skip down a bit :)

Categories: FLOSS Project Planets

Akademy-es 2015 registration open

Planet KDE - Tue, 2015-03-24 15:18

We have just opened the registration for Akademy-es 2015.

This year we are piggy-backing on the Akademy 2015 registration system since Akademy-es 2015 happens in the same place just 2 days before so we thought it made sense have a common registration for both.

More info at https://www.kde-espana.org/akademy-es2015/registro.php

See you at A Coruña!

Categories: FLOSS Project Planets

Lullabot: Paying It Forward: Drupal 8 Accelerate

Planet Drupal - Tue, 2015-03-24 14:00

Have you heard about the Drupal 8 Accelerate fund? The Drupal Association is collaborating with Drupal 8 branch maintainers to provide grants for those actively working on Drupal 8, with the goal of accelerating its release.

Categories: FLOSS Project Planets

Ugo Cei: Securing the Home Professionally

Planet Apache - Tue, 2015-03-24 13:31

There are many things that you need to consider when you are choosing a locksmith for the security of your house or your business area. If you are making sure that the following factors are followed by the company that you are hiring, then you will be able to choose a perfect services that can provide you with better features.

The Experience of Company. The first thing that you need to know is whether the company hires locksmiths with any kind of experience working in the field. The experience of the employees working there is not your concern but should consider the years of experience that the company has in the security niche. This is very important for knowing whether the security company can really do their task in the way you want it to be or not. It is necessary for you to understand when the company was established and also the number of years of experience that it has over the field.

The Headquarters of Company. It is also important to know whether the company has a headquarters or not. There are two uses in knowing the headquarters of the company. The first purpose of checking for the headquarters is that you can be sure that the company has all the facilities in a professional way for providing the features needed for keeping your house or any of your property safe and secure. You are giving the freedom for a person to get into your house and go through every nook and corner so that they can fix the lock systems necessary for keeping your house safe and protected. This can also help you in really understanding the facilities that the security company is going to offer you before you are signing contract with them. This is the perfect chance for you to evaluate them in the most possible manner so that you can really make the decision whether to go on with the company or not.

Retaining of Contract. There are certain companies that can design and install the security system for you but they do not take the time for retaining the contract with you but will sell that contract to some other company. Just getting the lock security system installed is not what you wanted but to have their assistance in between is required. You should make sure that your company has these facilities to offer you so that you can be sure about having the best kind of lock security system installed at your place.

The Length of the Agreement. You should know the length of the contract that you have with the company. There are chances for you to think about ending the company’s contract may be due to the incapability for affording the company or may be due to their poor service. In either case it is necessary for you to know the term that you have for the contract with the security company.

Categories: FLOSS Project Planets

Ugo Cei: Modeling Comfort into Your Own Style

Planet Apache - Tue, 2015-03-24 13:30

The master bathroom is often a room that people overlook when it comes to style. Your bathroom is more than just functional. It should a place where you can relax and indulge in personal comforts. There are lots of great ways to transform you master bath into a mini haven without spending a lot of money in your bathroom remodeling los angeles project. This article will give you some tips that you can use.

Your master bath is your personal space. No one else should really be using your master bathroom except for you and your significant other. So, when it comes to styling, make it your own. What ever delights you, incorporate that into the design. Look through home magazines and books for ideas. If you have a favorite theme, you can even work that into it. This space is yours, so do whatever you want in making it a place that will help you feel good.

The cost of the remodel will depend on who does the work and what kind of material you are using. Compare prices with other remodeling contractors and businesses. When it comes to materials, you do not have to spend a lot to get good quality. Some people like to go with luxury brand fixtures that command a high price. However, you can find many attractive alternatives in your everyday brands. Plan out how you want your master bath to look like on a piece of paper. Do you need a bigger tub where you can soak away your stress? Do you need storage space for your towels? Where will you put your toiletries so they are easy to get to? As you are envisioning a design, picture yourself going through and living in this design.

Try to think of anything else that will make your master bath the ultimate comfort zone. The little details make a big difference. For instance, how many times have you wished that you hand more hooks to hang your clothes so you do not have to hang everything on one hook? What about the lighting? Is the lighting soft, or is it glaringly harsh? Small details can make all the difference in your enjoyment. Pamper yourself with various luxury items. Build mini shelves where you can store some scented bath oil around to add to your bath to make your skin softer and nicer smelling. What about putting Jacuzzi jets in your tub? A localized heat element can warm up your bathroom without warming up the whole house. When you have a list of things that you want your master bath to include, do some research on prices.

Find out what the market price is for these things. Remember if you are hiring a contractor to do this, about two-thirds of your remodel cost will go toward labor. Most companies will offer discounts if they are hired for more than one project, such as if you need a kitchen or garage conversion on top of the bathroom remodeling. It can save you money down the road on projects you know you will need done. If you follow these simple steps in your master bathroom remodel, you can transform it into what you like without breaking your budget. Do not rush through the planning stage. Plan carefully and thoughtfully, and you can finally have the master bathroom of your dreams.

Categories: FLOSS Project Planets

Kubuntu-Based SuperX 3.0 Released

Planet KDE - Tue, 2015-03-24 13:26

Wrishiraj Kaushik announced SuperX 3.0 on March 23 Linux operating system for computers. This major version includes a great number of features, updated applications, new artwork, and lots of under-the-hood improvements.

Dubbed Grace, SuperX 3.0 is Kubuntu based on 14.04 LTS (Long Term Support). It features the Linux kernel 3.13.0, and KDE Application 4.13.3 desktop environment, showcasing a flat theme with bright contrasting colors. SuperX 3.0 includes the latest available versions of the Mozilla Firefox and Chromium web browsers, Mozilla Thunderbird email and news client, LibreOffice office suite, GIMP image editor, FileZilla file transfer client, VLC Media Player video player, Musique music player, Minitube YouTube downloader, OpenShot video editor, and Telegram messaging client. Apt-fast has also been integrated in SuperX 3.0 for faster apt-get functionality. The USB Modem Manager has been added in order to manage USB dongles, Indian language input support is provided via the IBus keyboard input method, an on-screen keyboard has been added, supporting both English and Indian languages, as well as a beautiful splash screen.

A great slideshow is available at SOFTPEDIA.

Categories: FLOSS Project Planets

Mediacurrent: A Comparison of Drupal 7 Image Caption Methods using WYSIWYG Module with CKEditor

Planet Drupal - Tue, 2015-03-24 13:18

I recently had the opportunity to explore popular methods of adding captions to images inside the WYSIWYG editor using the setup of WYSIWYG module with CKEditor library. Our two main criteria were Media module integration and a styled caption in the WYSIWYG editor. As I discovered, we couldn’t have both without custom coding which the budget didn’t allow for. Media module integration won out and the File Entity with View Modes method was chosen. 

The modules/methods I reviewed were:

Categories: FLOSS Project Planets

Daniel Pocock: The easiest way to run your own OpenID?

Planet Drupal - Tue, 2015-03-24 12:57

A few years ago, I was looking for a quick and easy way to run OpenID on a small web server.

A range of solutions were available but some appeared to be slightly more demanding than what I would like. For example, one solution required a servlet container such as Tomcat and another one required some manual configuration of Python with Apache.

I came across the SimpleID project. As the name implies, it is simple. It is written in PHP and works with the Apache/PHP environment on just about any Linux web server. It allows you to write your own plugin for a user/password database or just use flat files to get up and running quickly with no database at all.

This seemed like the level of simplicity I was hoping for so I created the Debian package of SimpleID. SimpleID is also available in Ubuntu.

Help needed

Thanks to a contribution from Jean-Michel Nirgal Vourgère, I've just whipped up a 0.8.1-14 package that should fix Apache 2.4 support in jessie. I also cleaned up a documentation bug and the control file URLs.

Nonetheless, it may be helpful to get feedback from other members of the community about the future of this package:

  • Is it considered secure enough?
  • Have other people found it relatively simple to install or was I just lucky when I tried it?
  • Are there other packages that now offer such a simple way to get OpenID for a vanilla Apache/PHP environment?
  • Would anybody else be interested in helping to maintain this package?
  • Would anybody like to see this packaged in other distributions such as Fedora?
  • Is anybody using it for any online community?
Works with HOTP one-time-passwords and LDAP servers

One reason I chose SimpleID is because of dynalogin, the two-factor authentication framework. I wanted a quick and easy way to use OTP with OpenID so I created the SimpleID plugin for dynalogin, also available as a package.

I also created the LDAP backend for SimpleID, that is available as a package too.

Works with Drupal

I tested SimpleID for login to a Drupal account when the OpenID support is enabled in Drupal, it worked seamlessly. I've also tested it with a few public web sites that support OpenID.

Categories: FLOSS Project Planets

Daniel Pocock: The easiest way to run your own OpenID provider?

Planet Debian - Tue, 2015-03-24 12:57

A few years ago, I was looking for a quick and easy way to run OpenID on a small web server.

A range of solutions were available but some appeared to be slightly more demanding than what I would like. For example, one solution required a servlet container such as Tomcat and another one required some manual configuration of Python with Apache.

I came across the SimpleID project. As the name implies, it is simple. It is written in PHP and works with the Apache/PHP environment on just about any Linux web server. It allows you to write your own plugin for a user/password database or just use flat files to get up and running quickly with no database at all.

This seemed like the level of simplicity I was hoping for so I created the Debian package of SimpleID. SimpleID is also available in Ubuntu.

Help needed

Thanks to a contribution from Jean-Michel Nirgal Vourgère, I've just whipped up a 0.8.1-14 package that should fix Apache 2.4 support in jessie. I also cleaned up a documentation bug and the control file URLs.

Nonetheless, it may be helpful to get feedback from other members of the community about the future of this package:

  • Is it considered secure enough?
  • Have other people found it relatively simple to install or was I just lucky when I tried it?
  • Are there other packages that now offer such a simple way to get OpenID for a vanilla Apache/PHP environment?
  • Would anybody else be interested in helping to maintain this package?
  • Would anybody like to see this packaged in other distributions such as Fedora?
  • Is anybody using it for any online community?
Works with HOTP one-time-passwords and LDAP servers

One reason I chose SimpleID is because of dynalogin, the two-factor authentication framework. I wanted a quick and easy way to use OTP with OpenID so I created the SimpleID plugin for dynalogin, also available as a package.

I also created the LDAP backend for SimpleID, that is available as a package too.

Works with Drupal

I tested SimpleID for login to a Drupal account when the OpenID support is enabled in Drupal, it worked seamlessly. I've also tested it with a few public web sites that support OpenID.

Categories: FLOSS Project Planets

Drupal core announcements: Drupal 8 beta 8 TOMORROW on Wednesday, March 25, 2015

Planet Drupal - Tue, 2015-03-24 12:24

The next beta for Drupal 8 will be beta 8! Here is the schedule for the beta release.

Wednesday, March 25, 2015 Drupal 8.0.0-beta8 released. Emergency commits only.
Categories: FLOSS Project Planets

Nuvole: A pluggable field-handling system for the Behat Drupal Extension

Planet Drupal - Tue, 2015-03-24 12:15
Write more complete Behat test scenarios for both Drupal 7 and Drupal 8.

On of the main goal of BDD (Behaviour Driven Development) is to be able to describe a system's behavior using a single notation, in order to be directly accessible by product owners and developers and testable using automatic conversion tools.

In the PHP world, Behat is the tool of choice. Behat allows to write test scenarios using Gherkin step definitions and it generates the corresponding PHP code to actually run and test the defined scenarios.

Thanks to the excellent Behat Drupal Extension Drupal developers have been able to enjoy the benefits of Behavioral Driven Development for quite some time.

Essentially the project provides an integration between Drupal and Behat allowing the usage of Drupal-specific Gherkin step definitions. For example, writing a scenario that tests node authorship would look like:

Scenario: Create nodes with specific authorship
  Given users:
  | name     | mail            | status |
  | Joe User | joe@example.com | 1      |
  And "article" content:
  | title          | author   | body             |
  | Article by Joe | Joe User | PLACEHOLDER BODY |
  When I am logged in as a user with the "administrator" role
  And I am on the homepage
  And I follow "Article by Joe"
  Then I should see the link "Joe User" Dealing with complex content types

The Gherkin scenario above is pretty straightforward and it gets the job done for simple cases. In a real-life situation, though, it's very common to have content types with a high number of fields, often of different types and, possibly, referencing other entities.

The following scenario might be a much more common situation for a Drupal developer:

Scenario: Reference site pages from within a "Post" node
  Given "page" content:
    | title      |
    | Page one   |
    | Page two   |
    | Page three |
  When I am viewing a "post" content:
    | title                | Post title         |
    | body                 | PLACEHOLDER BODY   |
    | field_post_reference | Page one, Page two |
  Then I should see "Page one"
  And I should see "Page two"

While it is always possible to implement project specific step-definition, as show on this Gist dealing with field collections and entity references, having to do that for every specific content type might be an unnecessary burden.

Introducing field-handling for the Behat Drupal Extension

Nuvole recently contributed a field-handling system that would allow the scenario above to be ran out of the box, without having to implement any custom step definition, working both in Drupal 7 and Drupal 8. The idea behind it is to allow a Drupal developer to work with fields when writing Behat test scenarios, regardless of the entity type or of any field-specific implementation.

The code is currently available on the master branches of both the Behat Drupal Extension and the Drupal Driver projects, if you want to try it out follow the instructions at "Stand-alone installation" and make sure to grab the right code by specifying the right package versions in your composer.json file:

{
  "require": {
    "drupal/drupal-extension": "3.0.*@dev",
    "drupal/drupal-driver": "1.1.*@dev"
}

The field-handling system provides an integration with several highly-used field types, like:

Date fields

Date field values can be included in a test scenario by using the following notation:

  • Single date field value can be expressed as 2015-02-08 17:45:00
  • Start and end date are separated by a dash -, for ex. 2015-02-08 17:45:00 - 2015-02-08 19:45:00.
  • Multiple date field values are separated by a comma ,

For example, the following Gherkin notation will create a node with 3 date fields:

When I am viewing a "post" content:
  | title       | Post title                                |
  | field_date1 | 2015-02-08 17:45:00                       |
  | field_date2 | 2015-02-08 17:45:00, 2015-02-09 17:45:00  |
  | field_date3 | 2015-02-08 17:45:00 - 2015-02-08 19:45:00 | Entity reference fields

Entity reference field values can be expressed by simply specifying the referenced entity's label field (e.g. the node's title or the term's name). Such an approach wants to keep up with BDD's promise: i.e. describing the system behavior by abstracting, as much as possible, any internal implementation.

For example, to reference to a content item with title "Page one" we can simply write:

When I am viewing a "post" content:
  | title           | Post title |
  | field_reference | Page one   |

Or, in case of multiple fields, titles will be separated by a comma:

When I am viewing a "post" content:
  | title           | Post title         |
  | field_reference | Page one, Page two | Link fields

A Link field in Drupal offers quite a wide range of options, such as an optional link title or internal/external URLs. We can use the following notation to work with links in our test scenarios:

When I am viewing a "post" content:
  | title       | Post title                                              |
  | field_link1 | http://nuvole.org                                       |
  | field_link2 | Link 1 - http://nuvole.org                              |
  | field_link3 | Link 1 - http://nuvole.org, Link 2 - http://example.com |

As you can see we use always the same pattern: a dash - to separate parts of the same field value and a comma , to separate multiple field values.

Text fields with "Select" widget

We can also refer to a select list value by simply referring to its label, so to have much more readable test scenarios. For example, given the following allowed values for a select field:

option1|Single room
option2|Twin room
option3|Double room

In our test scenario, we can simply write:

When I am viewing a "post" content:
  | title      | Post title               |
  | field_room | Single room, Double room | Working with other entity types

Field-handling works with other entity types too, such as users and taxonomy terms. We can easily have a scenario that would create a bunch of users with their relative fields by writing:

Given users:
  | name    | mail                | language | field_name | field_surname | field_country  |
  | antonio | antonio@example.com | it       | Antonio    | De Marco      | Belgium        |
  | andrea  | andrea@example.com  | it       | Andrea     | Pescetti      | Italy          |
  | fabian  | fabian@example.com  | de       | Fabian     | Bircher       | Czech Republic | Contributing to the project

At the moment field-handling is still a work in progress and, while it does support both Drupal 7 and Drupal 8, it covers only a limited set of field types, such as:

  • Simple text fields
  • Date fields
  • Entity reference fields
  • Link fields
  • List text fields
  • Taxonomy term reference fields

If you want to contribute to the project by providing additional field type handlers you will need to implement this very simple, core-agnostic, interface:

<?php
namespace Drupal\Driver\Fields;

/**
* Interface FieldHandlerInterface
* @package Drupal\Driver\Fields
*/
interface FieldHandlerInterface {

  /**
   * Expand raw field values in a format compatible with entity_save().
   *
   * @param $values
   *    Raw field values array.
   * @return array
   *    Expanded field values array.
   */
  public function expand($values);
}
?>

If you need some inspiration check the current handlers implementation by inspecting classes namespaced as \Drupal\Driver\Fields\Drupal7 and \Drupal\Driver\Fields\Drupal8.

Tags: Drupal PlanetTest Driven DevelopmentBehat
Categories: FLOSS Project Planets

4Sitestudios.com Drupal Blog: Wordpress, Drupal and SEO.

Planet Drupal - Tue, 2015-03-24 12:00

Something that’s seen a resurgence of late is the importance of SEO and site/page ranking (though if your job revolves around content, you’d probably say it never left). It seems like after the initial crush of SEO and SEO specialists in the early-ish days of the web, things like backlink ranking, metadata, alt tags and all those other accessibility tools went the way of the dodo. Gone were the days where people massaged their content to smash in as many keywords as possible, where SEO specialists were getting paid obscene amounts of money to add in <meta> data into your html templates. Design reigned supreme.

But with the sheer amount of information available online, there remains a pressing and consistent need to ensure that your site rises above the fray; you want to be the expert, the forum for discussion, the end-all-be-all. So you’ve put together that lovely little site with the cool hamburger nav, the beautifully optimized content, the frequently updated blog and news sections--what’s next?

One of the key tools that people don’t really use is Google analytics; sure, everyone’s got that tracking code embedded in their templates or footer, and every so often, you’ll go in there and take a look at the cool line graph that tells you...well, nothing really. If you dig deeper into GA, you get an awesome picture of where, when, how, and even why people are visiting your site. You can see which content people like, which content is shared and liked, how often and by whom.

So that’s step one: Use GA to it’s full potential.

They have enough tools to make you cry, but if you make the effort to wade through them, you can tailor it to not only fit your content or website better, you can also make website a better fit for the web itself. Both Drupal and Wordpress make it so easy to add in the GA tracking code that there’s really no excuse to not have it up and running, secreting away all those squirrely little details Google is so fond of.

But more importantly, on the subject of tools, is a wonderful little plugin for Wordpress called Yoast. If you’ve worked with WP, have a WP site, or even browse the internet, you’ve probably heard of this plugin, and for good reason...it’s stunningly easy to setup and use. It tells you what pages are awful, how many keywords you’re missing, when your content is poorly optimized, when your images don’t have tags and text, and a number of other issues that take the best stab at Google’s inscrutable SEO rules/ranking criteria as you can get. This plugin is so ubiquitous as to be almost mandatory if you care at all about getting your website seen--the makers claim that Yoast has been downloaded almost 15 million times. So what’s the option for Drupal?

The short answer is, there isn’t one.

Sure, when it comes down to it, you have the same options as WP sites--being customizable is, after all, kind of Drupal’s thing. You can edit your templates to add in your markup, you can install dozens of modules (XML sitemap, pathauto, Google analytics, redirect, metatag, token, page title, SEO checker, SEO checklist...and the list goes on), and you’ll eventually get the same functionality as one WP plugin that takes literally two minutes to add and install. And that’s including the time it takes to actually FTP in.

And I suppose this all fits in with Drupal’s more...Drupal-y...audience. It’s open source--you’re expected to code, to configure, to muck, to install and extend. It’s just one of those things where you shouldn’t have to install so many different, specialized modules to get the functionality you need to optimize. Sure-- there’s even a module called SEO Tools -- but it has a list of 18 additional “recommended/required modules,” and all that gets you is a screen that looks remarkably like the Google analytics dashboard.

I hesitate to use the word “lazy,” when what I really mean is “efficient,” or the even more adept “optimized,” but really--you just spent weeks/months and thousands of dollars getting a site up and running, UX’d, designed, sprinted and agile-d. The final step, the key step to actually getting your site seen, should not be a massive, dozen-module installing, template editing undertaking.

Obviously, the SEO ideal for a fresh or redesigned Drupal site is a thorough and well-planned strategy phase, and if there’s time, budget, interest (and willpower) to structure your content around key SEO strategies, it’s perfect. But if you’ve ever worked on websites, you know that sometimes you just need something that works well out of the box.

WP has Yoast. Where’s Drupal’s “something?” Consider the gauntlet thrown.

 
Categories: FLOSS Project Planets

Last chance to vote on the date for the Randa Meetings 2015

Planet KDE - Tue, 2015-03-24 10:01

We plan to close the Doodle for the Randa Meetings date selection at the end of this week. So if you plan to participate please vote on the date that best fits you! And keep in mind two things:

  • You might bring your partner or family with you to Randa. We started this last year and people really liked it (and Randa is a nice holiday place in the Alps too – near to the world-known Zermatt).
  • If you see a lot of well-known names on the Doodle don’t think you shouldn’t be part of this. We always want to see new people with fresh energy and inspiring thoughts and ideas in Randa.

So please add yourself as quickly as possible or write me an email (fux AT kde) or ping me on IRC (unormal).

 

Categories: FLOSS Project Planets

Drupal Easy: Book Review: Drush for Developers (Second Edition)

Planet Drupal - Tue, 2015-03-24 09:48

Calling this book a "second edition" is more than a little bit curious, since there is no Drush for Developers (First Edition). I can only assume that the publisher considers Juampy's excellent Drush User's Guide (reviewed here) as the "first edition" of Drush for Developers (Second Edition), but that really minimzes ths book, as it is so much more than an updated version of Drush User's Guide. It would be like saying The Godfather, Part 2 is an updated version of The Godfather - which is just crazy talk. Drush Developer's Guide is more of a sequel - and (like The Godfather, Part 2) a darn good one at that.

-->

read more

Categories: FLOSS Project Planets

Vincent Fourmond: Release 0.12 of ctioga2

Planet Debian - Tue, 2015-03-24 09:43
Out is the new version of ctioga2, which brings:
  • a much better handling of heterogeneous x,y coordinates in heat maps: ctioga2 now automatically splits the data into homogeneous segments;
  • control on the properties of the fill and the stroke of symbols (image)
  • decent improvement of error messages
  • and some bug fixes and other minor improvements
As usual, the new release is available as a gem:
~ gem update ctioga2 The website has also been decently improved, with now a search box for finding images in the gallery
Categories: FLOSS Project Planets

DebConf team: Working towards a child-friendly DebConf (Posted by Martin Krafft)

Planet Debian - Tue, 2015-03-24 09:35

The Debian Project will celebrate its 22nd birthday during DebConf15 in Heidelberg in August 2015. At this age, it’s unsurprising that children of Debian contributors have attended our developer conference for several years.

Going with the times, we would like to work further towards making DebConf15 a child-friendly (parents-friendly) conference. The conference venue is far away from traffic, self-contained, and there is a dedicated children’s play room. There are green areas around, and the Heidelberg Zoo is literally within sight of the venue. We haven’t yet discussed deals with them, but we could.

In short: if you’d like to attend DebConf, but you are yet unsure what to do with your children… bring your kids along!

The hostel has a number of 3 and 4 bed-rooms with en-suite bathrooms, plus a good supply of cots available for the very little ones. We will allocate such rooms to families exclusively for your privacy (subject to availability, so please register yourself ASAP, and include a note about your kids).

We would also like to explore additional possibilities to make it easier for parents to participate in the conference. At the moment, we’re still scouting for ideas and there are already a number of promising leads.

To help us figure out what we’d best offer, we need to know about the demand. If you are planning to bring your children, or if you’re thinking about it, please drop a short note with number and ages and any other relevant information to kids@debconf.org. Your mail will be read by a few parents involved in the organisation of DebConf15 and we will obviously keep your data private.

We also created a (publicly archived) mailing list to discuss options and keep people updated on our plans. Please subscribe yourself to the list, if interested, and feel free to write to debconf-kids@lists.debian.org with any questions or ideas you might have.

Categories: FLOSS Project Planets

Drupalize.Me: Tutorial: Vagrant Drupal 8 Development

Planet Drupal - Tue, 2015-03-24 09:04

Vagrant Drupal Development (VDD) is a ready-to-use development environment using a virtual machine. Why use it? It provides a standard hosting setup, contained in a virtual machine, for developing with Drupal. This allows you to get up and running really, really quickly, without knowing anything about server administration.

Categories: FLOSS Project Planets

Telegram Connection Manager — The first release is going on

Planet KDE - Tue, 2015-03-24 08:45

After a long period of silence I’m coming with a news: Telepathy-Morse project is “still alive” and the first release is going on.

Short introduction: I’m working on the Qt-based Telegram Connection Manager for KDE Telepathy. Actually, there is two subprojects:

  1. TelegramQt — Qt-based library which supports messaging, contact-list operations and other telegram client capabilities. The purpose of this library is to abstract from the telegram protocol details and provide a convenient API for a client application development.
  2. Telepathy-Morse — Qt-based Telegram client (connection manager) for Telepathy communication framework. Uses TelegramQt under the hood.

Note: In order to use Morse, you need to have a complementary Telepathy Client application, such as KDE-Telepathy or Empathy.
Note: Telepathy-Morse depends on the latest telepathy-qt version (0.9.6), which might be not available yet.
Now, let’s talk about the development, current progress and plans for the near future.

What is expected to work (on high level):

  • Contact list with first/last names
  • Contact avatars
  • Contact management (you can add/delete contact by its phone number)
  • Personal messaging (one to one)
  • User typing events
  • Message acknowledgment
  • Own presence (online, offline, hidden)
  • Loading unread messages on connect
  • DBus activation
  • Sessions (Means that you don’t have to get confirmation code again and again)
  • Restoring connection on network problem

Known Issues

  • Initial low-level encryption sometimes generates bad random values, which leads to “connection doesn’t work” issue.
  • Can not send long messages (Missed TelegramQt gzip packing implementation; limit is about 400 characters; telegram protocol limitation is 4095 characters)

Both TelegramQt and Telepathy-Morse are Qt4 and Qt5 compatible.
Information about CMake build: by default CMake looks for the Qt5 build. You can pass USE_QT4 option (-DUSE_QT4=true) to process Qt4 build.

Sailfish OS
Telepathy-Morse almost works on the sailfish devices, but there is one show-stopper: The authentication dialog invocation doesn’t work. We do basically the same thing, as do Telepathy-Gabble (which is known to work), but it have no effect. Sadly, I don’t have a Sailfish device and didn’t test it. Big thanks are going to Teemu Varsamaki, who managed to build Morse for Sailfish, find-out authentication issue and, nonetheless, use the client with an uploaded copy of the auth-info file from desktop.

Telegram Blackberry Contest, Teletonne
I’ve contacted by the “Telegram client for Blackberry” developers. They’re use TelegramQt application in their Teletonne client and win Second prize. More details at https://telegram.org/blog/bb-results. Now it looks like they’re give up with further competition, while it’s really easy to get next prize for “the developers who make the most progress”, as there is many major improvements in TelegramQt. Sadly again, I have no good phone :-) to take a part.

Release
There is no tarballs yet. I’m not familiar with KDE release process, but I’m going to tackle it soon. (I hope to fix the Sailfish issue)

Next tasks
I see three basic directions in the Telegram client development:

  1. Group chat
  2. Secure chat
  3. Multimedia messages, files receiving/upload

Group chat support is mostly implemented in TelegramQt library, but TelepathyQt service bindings requires changes to support (such type of) group chat. Of course, TelepathyQt client bindings have everything we need, so clients (e.g. KDE Telepathy) works well with group chat (e.g. in pair with telepathy-gabble, jabber connection manager).
In its turn, Telepathy-Morse is the first “more, than proof of concept” Qt-based telepathy connection manager, thus TelepathyQt services previously was not used so much. Telegram group chat has “not addressable” rooms and, as I see, the services might needs a little redesign to support it.

Secure chat. As I know, technically it looks like embedded telegram session with the same cryptography methods, which already implemented for the basic telegram connection. This is not a priority task for me (at least at this moment).

Multimedia messages. File download capability is already implemented and used for avatars and initial photo-messages support. I need to tune it a bit for “big files” operation support. Outgoing media messages needs some significant work, because one can not just upload files “as is”, but should meet Telegram requirements, such as format, resolution, etc. I have no strong decision on the API and TelegramQt responsibility yet.
Implementation of the last task means almost automatic “done” for the self avatar changing (uploading) capability.
I have never heard about open source Telepathy stack component with multimedia message support, so, probably, there will be a lot of work. Telepathy specification have some hints on this subject.

Short note about TelegramQt test application
The test application is not intends to be telegram client for end users, but supposed to be feature full developer-oriented application with easy access to some artificial operations, just to be sure that TelegramQt works as expected. Because of TelegramQt documentation nonexistence, the test app source can be useful as API usage example as well.

Pictures :)

Group chat with multimedia messages in TelegramQt TestApp.

Morse and TelegramQt TestApp in process of one-to-one chatting. As you can see, there is avatars in contact-list, typing status in ktp-text-ui, messages timestamp, delivery-report and a little allusion.

Acknowledgments

  • KDE Project and especially David Edmundson for making this project possible.
  • David Edmundson again, for moral and technical support and for the ktp-accounts-kcm plugin for Morse.
  • Matthias Gehre for his work on the TelepathyQt services.
  • Previous post autumn commentators, especially Alberto, who eventually made me to continue this project, instead of delaying it again and again under pressure of everyday cares.
  • Teemu Varsamaki for actual code contribution, ideas, testing.

Links

Afterword
I’m so sorry for the slow development, it’s a consequence of mine “always busy” reality. The project is not abandon and will not be abandon. I hope you’ll see an update next few months. Thank you for reading.


Categories: FLOSS Project Planets

Python Software Foundation: Google Summer of Code Applications are open!

Planet Python - Tue, 2015-03-24 08:05


Google Summer of Code is a program for post-secondary students who want to work on open source projects as a means of summer employment, and the Python Software Foundation is serving as an umbrella-organization to a large number of Python-based open source projects this year!
Whether you want to write code to help with manned missions on Mars, help manage online content, do machine learning, enhance medicine, study complex networks, do faster mathematics, create innovative user interfaces or... well, we'd say the sky's the limit, but with folk like AstroPy on our sub-org list, our sights go pretty far into the sky!
Check out the full list of participating sub-orgs here:
https://wiki.python.org/moin/SummerOfCode/2015
We know it can be overwhelming, so here's 7 things you can do to get yourself started:
1. Choose an organization to work with. 2. Start communicating with the developers. 3. Set up your own development environment. 4. Find some beginner-friendly bugs and try to fix them. 5. Even if you don’t have time to fix them right away, report them. 6. Help write and edit documentation. 7. Help others!
... and get started on writing your application!
Make sure to get those applications in by the deadline, 27 March at 19:00 UTC.
Categories: FLOSS Project Planets
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